Perception and Cognition

Course Details

Course Number: 4133  Section Number: 201

Spring 2011

Location: Prothro-Yeager Hall

Classroom Number: 101

Days & Times:

MWF 9:00-9:50



Course Attachments

Syllabus  psyc_3314_syllabus_spring_2112-20120329-141859.pdf

Textbooks

MSU Faculty Member
Dr. George M. Diekhoff   
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Course Objectives

This course explores the human being from an information processing perspective. Topics include sensory aspects of information extraction, selective attention and concentration, problems related to perception and recognition, and the structures and processes of human memory systems.


Course Expectations

 Topics                                                                        Reading Assignments

 Introduction                                                                 Chapter 1

 Sensory Processes                                                  no assigned reading

 Preattentive and Attentional Processes               Chapter 3

 Pattern Recognition                                                  Chapter 2

 Short-Term Memory                                                   Chapter 4, Chapter 6 (pp. 164-182),

                                                                                        Chapter 7

 Long-Term Memory                                                    Chapters 5, 8

 Social Perception                                                        no assigned reading

 Creative Problem Solving (and other loose ends)     Chapter 11

 EXAMS

 Four noncumulative exams will be given at approximately equal intervals throughout the semester.  Tentative test dates, subject to change, are Feb. 11, Mar. 7, Apr. 11, and May 6. Each exam will test knowledge of material covered in class (and related readings) since the previous exam and will be worth 100 points. The purpose of spacing exams equally is to attempt to equalize the amount of material covered by each exam

 TERM PAPER

 All students are required to write an original term paper on an individual or topic of relevance to perception and cognition. You must each write your own paper, but I encourage you to help each other out by exchanging editing services, sharing tips on finding information, etc. The paper will be worth 50 points toward your course grade, i.e., half as much as a test. Before you invest too much time in your paper, check the topic with me and get approval to proceed (see deadlines below).

 You might find an article that piques your interest in the list of references in your textbook. Or try search around in the library database, especially PsychInfo. You’ll find something to write about.

 The paper should be written in APA style (more or less) as described in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  (Copies of this style manual are available from the MSU Bookstore or directly from the APA at www.apa.org  You may also want to consult the abbreviated APA style sheet found at  http://www.docstyles.com/apacrib.htm ). I’m a big fan of using headings and subheadings to clarify the organization of the paper.

 The length of the paper will depend on the obscurity of the topic. In general, however, the paper should be no fewer than 5 pages and no more than 15 pages in length, not counting the cover page, abstract, references, figures, photos, tables, etc.  Again, depending on the topic, I would expect to see at least five reference sources cited, but that’ll depend on what’s available.

 In addition to other sources (e.g. Internet, books) make sure that your references included at least three journal articles.

 Deadlines:  Submission of term paper topic and working title—February 11. Submission of some of your references and a tentative paper outline—March 7. Submission of completed term paper—May 6, 5:00 pm. Papers received after this date and time will not be accepted under any circumstances and will receive a grade of 0.  No excuses, no extenuating circumstances, no exceptions.  Therefore, I strongly recommend that you plan to complete and submit your paper well in advance of the deadline to allow for the inevitable catastrophes that are sure to befall you!

 Papers should be prepared using word processing software that will allow them to be opened using Word software and must be submitted as an e-mail attachment.  Be sure to follow the following format in naming the file that contains your paper:

 firstname.lastname.CWID#.psyc4133.spring.2011.termpaper

 Note: By enrolling in this course, the student expressly grants MSU a 'limited right' in all intellectual property created by the student for the purpose of this course.  The "limited right" shall include but shall not be limited to the right to reproduce the student's work product in order to verify originality and authenticity, and for educational purposes.  (What this means is that you grant Midwestern State University the right to submit your paper to TurnItIn.com or other similar services where it will be scanned for evidence of plagiarism and become a permanent part of their database of papers.) Clear evidence of plagiarism will result in a grade of 0 on the paper.  So don’t cheat. And don’t use a paper that you’ve used before in another class.)


Grading Standards

GRADING

Course grades will be based on accumulated point totals on exams. Each exam will be worth 100 points (90-100 = A; 80-89 = B; 70-79 = C; 60-69 = D; 59 or lower = F), and the term paper will be worth 50 points. Points accumulated on the five exams will convert to a course grade as follows:

405-450 = A ,360-404 = B, 315-359 = C, 270-314 = D, <270 = F

Each unexcused absence beyond the 5 that are allowed (see below) will reduce the point total by 22 points (about one-half letter grade). Each tardy will reduce the point total by 11 points.


Final Exam5/9/2011  8:00 am

Submission Format Policy

 TERM PAPER

 All students are required to write an original term paper on an individual or topic of relevance to perception and cognition. You must each write your own paper, but I encourage you to help each other out by exchanging editing services, sharing tips on finding information, etc. The paper will be worth 50 points toward your course grade, i.e., half as much as a test. Before you invest too much time in your paper, check the topic with me and get approval to proceed (see deadlines below).

 You might find an article that piques your interest in the list of references in your textbook. Or try search around in the library database, especially PsychInfo. You’ll find something to write about.

 The paper should be written in APA style (more or less) as described in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  (Copies of this style manual are available from the MSU Bookstore or directly from the APA at www.apa.org  You may also want to consult the abbreviated APA style sheet found at  http://www.docstyles.com/apacrib.htm ). I’m a big fan of using headings and subheadings to clarify the organization of the paper.

 The length of the paper will depend on the obscurity of the topic. In general, however, the paper should be no fewer than 5 pages and no more than 15 pages in length, not counting the cover page, abstract, references, figures, photos, tables, etc.  Again, depending on the topic, I would expect to see at least five reference sources cited, but that’ll depend on what’s available.

 In addition to other sources (e.g. Internet, books) make sure that your references included at least three journal articles.

 Deadlines:  Submission of term paper topic and working title—February 11. Submission of some of your references and a tentative paper outline—March 7. Submission of completed term paper—May 6, 5:00 pm. Papers received after this date and time will not be accepted under any circumstances and will receive a grade of 0.  No excuses, no extenuating circumstances, no exceptions.  Therefore, I strongly recommend that you plan to complete and submit your paper well in advance of the deadline to allow for the inevitable catastrophes that are sure to befall you!

 Papers should be prepared using word processing software that will allow them to be opened using Word software and must be submitted as an e-mail attachment.  Be sure to follow the following format in naming the file that contains your paper:

 

firstname.lastname.CWID#.psyc4133.spring.2011.termpaper

 

Note: By enrolling in this course, the student expressly grants MSU a 'limited right' in all intellectual property created by the student for the purpose of this course.  The "limited right" shall include but shall not be limited to the right to reproduce the student's work product in order to verify originality and authenticity, and for educational purposes.  (What this means is that you grant Midwestern State University the right to submit your paper to TurnItIn.com or other similar services where it will be scanned for evidence of plagiarism and become a permanent part of their database of papers.) Clear evidence of plagiarism will result in a grade of 0 on the paper.  So don’t cheat. And don’t use a paper that you’ve used before in another class.)



Note: You may not submit a paper for a grade in this class that already has been (or will be) submitted for a grade in another course, unless you obtain the explicit written permission of me and the other instructor involved in advance.

Late Paper Policy

Deadlines: Submission of term paper topic and working title—February 11. Submission of some of your references and a tentative paper outline—March 7. Submission of completed term paper—May 6, 5:00 pm. Papers received after this date and time will not be accepted under any circumstances and will receive a grade of 0. No excuses, no extenuating circumstances, no exceptions. Therefore, I strongly recommend that you plan to complete and submit your paper well in advance of the deadline to allow for the inevitable catastrophes that are sure to befall you!


Plagiarism Policy Plagiarism is the use of someone else's thoughts, words, ideas, or lines of argument in your own work without appropriate documentation (a parenthetical citation at the end and a listing in "Works Cited")-whether you use that material in a quote, paraphrase, or summary. It is a theft of intellectual property and will not be tolerated, whether intentional or not.

Student Honor Creed

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

Students with Disabilities The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Safe Zones Statement The professor considers this classroom to be a place where you will be treated with respect as a human being - regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, political beliefs, age, or ability. Additionally, diversity of thought is appreciated and encouraged, provided you can agree to disagree. It is the professor's expectation that ALL students consider the classroom a safe environment.

Contacting your Instructor All instructors in the Department have voicemail in their offices and MWSU e-mail addresses. Make sure you add your instructor's phone number and e-mail address to both email and cell phone lists of contacts.

Attendance Requirements

ATTENDANCE POLICY Students are allowed 5 unexcused absences (as defined below) in this class. Each additional unexcused absence beyond these 5 will result in a lowering of the course grade as described above. Students who miss the calling of the roll at the beginning of the class will be counted as absent for that day unless you alert me to your presence at the end of the class period to let me know you were only tardy. Students who miss one or more exams because of absences will be allowed to take makeup exams at the end of the semester. All makeup exams will be administered on the date scheduled for the final exam, Monday, May 9, at 8:00 am. If you have no makeup exams to take, you won’t have to come in on that day. There will be no grade penalty for exams missed because of an excused absence. There will be a one letter grade penalty on exams missed because of unexcused absences. Absences are excused only under the following circumstances: 1. the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating that the student was unable to attend class on the day(s) of the absence; 2. the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating that the student's dependent child was ill on the day(s) of the absence; 3. the student provides a written excuse from an official of Midwestern State University stating that the student was in attendance at a mandatory university function on the day(s) of the absence. Funerals, employment-related absences, illnesses not requiring medical attention, job interviews, family emergencies, automobile malfunctions, court appearances, etc. do not constitute excused absences. Please reserve your 5 allowed unexcused absences to cover these situations.


Other Policies

ADDITIONAL EXPECTATIONS 1. Learning requires activity on the student’s part. This can be challenging in a lecture class, but students have found ways of dealing with the problem for centuries and so can you—by taking notes, thinking of examples, paraphrasing ideas that you hear in class, and so on. Please stay busy and involved in class by taking notes. My lecture outlines will be posted online only the night before exams, so you will need your own notes in order to study for exams. Use the posted outlines only as a last-minute check on the accuracy of your own notes. 2. Students at Midwestern are increasingly getting up and leaving classes, sometimes returning and sometimes not. That behavior is inappropriate and disruptive. Therefore, come to class on time and be prepared to stay for the duration of the class. It would never occur to me to walk out of a lecture except under the most extraordinary of circumstances (e.g., I’m coughing my head off and my presence is more disturbing to the class than my leaving), and I’d be even more unlikely to further disrupt the proceedings by coming back after having left! I do not want to have to establish a formal policy in order to manage this aspect of classroom behavior. Let’s all rely, then, on using common sense and common courtesy. 3. Do not use cell phones in class. If you bring a laptop, use it only for taking notes.


Writing Proficiency Requirement All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.