Foundations of Reading

Course Details

Course Number: READ 6213  Section Number: X10

Fall 2011

Location: Ferguson Hall

Classroom Number: Online

Days & Times:

Online



Course Attachments

Class Schedule  Course Outline READ6213-20120404-134839.pdf

Textbooks

MSU Faculty Member
Leann Curry   
view Profile »

Course Objectives

 

Course Objectives:

 

Students will be able to:

  • Increase their theoretical understanding of literacy concepts (e.g. critical literacy, cultural literacy, sociocultural literacy, technology and communication literacy, etc…
  • Increase their understanding of reading and writing processes with an emphasis on the psychological and physiological foundations
  • Understand and use reflective practice and outside resources to improve teaching
  • Design literacy instruction that meets the needs of individual learners by utilizing learners’ cultural, linguistic, social, emotional, and intellectual backgrounds

  

Course Objectives based upon the State Standards:

The goals of this course are based on the Standards for Reading Professionals developed by the Professional Standards and Ethics Committee of the International Reading Association (IRA);  The Standards for English Language Arts & Reading developed by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) and the International Reading Association (IRA).

 

 

Standards/Objectives

1.  Foundational Knowledge:  Candidates have knowledge of the foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction.  As a result, candidates will:

  • compare and contrast varied approaches to the teaching of reading.      
  • explain the stages of language learning and literacy development
  • explain how the theoretical roots of reading instruction influence classroom practice

 

2.  Instructional Strategies and Curriculum Materials:  Candidates use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction.  As a result, candidates will:

  • explain/demonstrate the major components of reading (phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, word identification and phonics, vocabulary and background knowledge, fluency, comprehension strategies, and motivation) and how they are integrated in fluent reading.
  • plan instruction using a variety of instructional strategies, approaches, and methods, including technology-based practices, for learners at different stages of development and from differing cultural and linguistic backgrounds in a public school setting. 
  • analyze materials and programs for literacy instruction (basals and beyond)
  • describe/plan instructional grouping options as appropriate for accomplishing given purposes.

 

3. Assessment, Diagnosis and Evaluation:  Candidates use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction.  As a result, candidates will:  

  • describe a wide range of assessment tools and practices that range from individual and group standardized tests to individual and group informal classroom assessment strategies. 
  • plan effective instruction that meets the needs of all students, including those at different developmental stages and those from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. 

 

4.  Creating a Literate Environment:  Candidates create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments.  As a result, candidates will:

  • describe/design a classroom for balanced literacy instruction to include grouping plans; organization of materials, display areas, learning centers, volunteers, parent involvement, etc. and plans for the beginning of school.

 

5.  Professional Development:  Candidates view professional development as a career-long effort and responsibility.  As a result, candidates will:

  • read, analyze, evaluate professional literature related to reading instruction
  • display positive dispositions related to reading and the teaching of reading

Focus of the Course:

  

·        Introducing Comprehensive Reading Instruction For All Learners

·        Language Learning and the Stages of Literacy Development

·        Theoretical Roots of Reading Instruction

·        Phonemic Awareness and Phonics Instruction

·        Increasing Vocabulary and Word Knowledge

·        Improving Reading Comprehension

·        Developing Reading Fluency

·        Materials and Programs for Literacy Instruction:  Basals and Beyond

·        Assessing Literacy Learning

·        Organizing for Reading Instruction:  Starting Out Right in Grades K-3

·        Providing Effective K-3 Literacy Instruction:  Every Child A Reader

·        The Transition Years:  Grades 4-6

·        Reading in the Middle School


Course Expectations

 

Assessment:    Student performance of knowledge and skills will be formally assessed by:

  • Literacy Autobiography -20%
  • Response to Readings - 30%
  • Class Led Discussions - 16%
  • Discussion Boards - 14%
  • Practicum (P)- 20%

Assignments/Grading Procedures:

 

  • Literacy Autobiography (20%) -   Each student will develop a literacy autobiography to highlight experiences that have shaped their personal perspectives about literacy instruction. Understanding your personal cultural history allows teachers to better understand the multiple perspectives of their students. To better serve their students, teachers should become aware of their own proficiencies in reading and writing and their attitudes toward literacy. This assignment allows teachers to think about their own cultural backgrounds by reflecting on how these backgrounds influence their literacy instruction. The assignment is intended to encourage you to reflect on your growth and development as a reader and writer. Students will create a literacy autobiography that contains, but is not limited to the following:
    • Personal Introduction- Give a personal introduction and description of your current home literacy environment, culture, attitudes and daily oral and written language practices.
    • First Reading and Writing Experiences-   Be sure to include your first memories of reading and writing (you may interview family members to refresh your memory; include titles of favorite books, writing samples (if you saved them), etc… (What were my experiences growing up? What are my earliest recollections of reading and writing?
    • School Literacy Experiences- Include literacy memories from elementary, middle, and high school (be reflective---- dig deep!) (What do you recall about learning to read and write in school? What kinds of instructional activities and practices were you involved in as an elementary student? How were children in my class treated? Were my teachers encouraging or discouraging about reading and writing? Did I read for pleasure then (elementary, middle, high school)? Now?  Why or why not? Were teachers ever disrespectful of children? Were some children treated differently? Why? What was my perception (then) of why children were treated differently? Has this perception changed? In retrospect, what belief systems and views of reading and learning did your elementary school teachers seem to hold? Were you effectively taught how to handle the variety of reading tasks you face in the real world? Who were my friends? Did I have friends from other cultural and racial groups? Was I ever the focus of prejudice or bias? What are my biases and prejudices? What is the root of my biases and prejudices? How am I working to overcome them?
    • Professional Perspectives- How have previous and current oral and written literacy practices impacted your current attitudes, practices, uses and literacy instruction in the classroom (be specific---use real life examples and application)?  What are the current changes occurring in your attitudes and practices? In what ways do my experiences with literacy and my cultural backgrounds shape my attitudes, beliefs, and practices related to children from diverse populations and the teaching of the language arts? 
    • Presentation- Turn your writings into a presentation that will inform your fellow teachers. You may use the following formats: Video, Podcast, digital story, web page, etc… Must include some type of technology. We will share our presentations through and online discussion. Autobiographies will be attached to the discussion board and uploaded through the “Assignment” link on Web CT.

 

  • Response to Readings (30%)-The majority of our class interaction (online discussions) will center on your responses to the assigned readings.  Please refrain from summarizing the readings.  Rather, respond critically and synthesize what you have read.  Include your personal responses to the readings. Question the text as you read. Write questions about things you don’t understand, things that make you think of your own learning, things that make you think of other articles or texts you have read, and especially things that you relate to your own teaching.  Your questions will support our discussions. Students will be required to respond to the following chapter readings: 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, & 15. These reflections will replace the final exam for this course. I will grade the reflections based on the following :

 

  • (a)Comprehension of the readings.  It should be clear that you have read the material thoroughly and that you understand the material. 

(b) Depth of response.  Your responses should clearly show that you have seriously considered the issues or concepts presented in the readings.  Although no specific length is required, it is not likely that you could write a response of much depth in less than1½ - 2 pages (double spaced; 12 point font).

(c)Timeliness.  Responses are due the class period for which they are assigned. Late responses will not be given full credit. Responses that are more than one week late will not be accepted. All reflections (“Response to Readings”) will be uploaded together via the “Assignments” link on Web CT. See course due dates/calendar for specific date.

 

  • Class Led  Online Discussions (16%) - Each student will be required to participate in discussions related to the text. Each student will lead two online discussion related to the assigned shared text. During these discussions, the student in charge will post many times to keep the discussion moving and on track. The purpose of this assignment is to allow students to reflect, explore, and dialogue with each other concerning topics and issues related to the readings. Discussions should be interactive and include activities that provoke discussion and raise further questions about the readings. Please refrain from summarizing the chapter; it is assumed that each student has done the reading. The course instructor will model this process. Class discussions will be assigned after the course starts. See course due dates/calendar.

 

  • Online Participation (14%) - Each student will be required to participate in online discussions. Using Web CT, students will be required to reply to each online discussion topic a minimum of 6 times. Online responses should be spaced apart, which allows you to interact with your peers more effectively. Please see the course calendar for online discussion dates and topics. Responses should provide insight into your thoughts and concerns regarding the topic or issue. One word responses and incomplete answers are unacceptable. Make sure your posts push the discussion forward. “Good point, Tom!” is an example of a less desirable post.  See Discussion Requirements for grading criteria.

 

  • Practicum (20%) - The practicum is an opportunity for you to apply the theory you have been accumulating to your work with an elementary/secondary student. Each person will select and work with one elementary student in reading/language arts for a minimum of 10-12 hours.  You will assess your student, set goals for the student’s literacy development, work with the student in those areas, and document the work you and the student do through lesson plans and reflections.

 

1.      Goalsfor the student should focus on the areas of language arts in which your student needs additional support.  You will identify these areas through observation, written assessments, and interactions with the student.  Set 2 specific goals (one for reading, one for writing), keeping in mind how you will develop lesson plans related to the goals and how you will assess whether the student achieved these goals.  If it is appropriate for your student, involve her/him in the goal-setting process. This could be as simple as asking what s/he would like to learn or get better at during the time you are there.  Keep in mind that the purpose of assessment is to guide instruction. This process should be documented in your lesson reflections (see below).

 

2.      Lesson plansdescribe what you will do, why you will do it, and how you will evaluate it.  Each practicum session should include 1) informal observation, 2) reading (shared, guided, and/or independent), and 3) writing (shared writing, guided, and/or independent). The writing goal should focus on the writing process rather than only on mechanics. Your goals and the first lesson plan will be evaluated by the instructor prior to implementation. You can email your first draft through Web CT email. You will also be discussing your practicum experience via the discussion board. This will allow you to receive feedback from your peers. If you have problems, please request additional assistance. 

 

3.      Lesson Reflections-After each session with your child, you will write a lesson reflection that describes the opportunities to learn which you provided for your student and how your student responded to them. The focus should be on the child and how the child responded. Be sure to include evidence. What did the child say/do? The student responses will provide evaluative information.   In order to capture accurate information about your thoughts and feelings that resulted from each session, lesson reflections should be written as soon as possible so you will not forget pertinent information. 

                                                                                            

4.      Personal Reflections- In this section, you will focus on YOU! You will describe the thoughts, feelings, joys, and concerns you had during the session and will share information about what you are learning about you as a teacher AND about teaching in general from this practicum experience.

 

The lesson plans, student work, lesson reflections, and personal reflections must be submitted together.  You will submit the final product to the “Assignment” link on Web CT.

 


Grading Standards

 

 

Assessment:    Student performance of knowledge and skills will be formally assessed by:

  • Literacy Autobiography -20%
  • Response to Readings - 30%
  • Class Led Discussions - 16%
  • Discussion Boards - 14%
  • Practicum (P)- 20%

 

Assignments/Grading Procedures:

 

  • Literacy Autobiography (20%) -   Each student will develop a literacy autobiography to highlight experiences that have shaped their personal perspectives about literacy instruction. Understanding your personal cultural history allows teachers to better understand the multiple perspectives of their students. To better serve their students, teachers should become aware of their own proficiencies in reading and writing and their attitudes toward literacy. This assignment allows teachers to think about their own cultural backgrounds by reflecting on how these backgrounds influence their literacy instruction. The assignment is intended to encourage you to reflect on your growth and development as a reader and writer. Students will create a literacy autobiography that contains, but is not limited to the following:
    • Personal Introduction- Give a personal introduction and description of your current home literacy environment, culture, attitudes and daily oral and written language practices.
    • First Reading and Writing Experiences-   Be sure to include your first memories of reading and writing (you may interview family members to refresh your memory; include titles of favorite books, writing samples (if you saved them), etc… (What were my experiences growing up? What are my earliest recollections of reading and writing?
    • School Literacy Experiences- Include literacy memories from elementary, middle, and high school (be reflective---- dig deep!) (What do you recall about learning to read and write in school? What kinds of instructional activities and practices were you involved in as an elementary student? How were children in my class treated? Were my teachers encouraging or discouraging about reading and writing? Did I read for pleasure then (elementary, middle, high school)? Now?  Why or why not? Were teachers ever disrespectful of children? Were some children treated differently? Why? What was my perception (then) of why children were treated differently? Has this perception changed? In retrospect, what belief systems and views of reading and learning did your elementary school teachers seem to hold? Were you effectively taught how to handle the variety of reading tasks you face in the real world? Who were my friends? Did I have friends from other cultural and racial groups? Was I ever the focus of prejudice or bias? What are my biases and prejudices? What is the root of my biases and prejudices? How am I working to overcome them?
    • Professional Perspectives- How have previous and current oral and written literacy practices impacted your current attitudes, practices, uses and literacy instruction in the classroom (be specific---use real life examples and application)?  What are the current changes occurring in your attitudes and practices? In what ways do my experiences with literacy and my cultural backgrounds shape my attitudes, beliefs, and practices related to children from diverse populations and the teaching of the language arts? 
    • Presentation- Turn your writings into a presentation that will inform your fellow teachers. You may use the following formats: Video, Podcast, digital story, web page, etc… Must include some type of technology. We will share our presentations through and online discussion. Autobiographies will be attached to the discussion board and uploaded through the “Assignment” link on Web CT.

 

  • Response to Readings (30%)-The majority of our class interaction (online discussions) will center on your responses to the assigned readings.  Please refrain from summarizing the readings.  Rather, respond critically and synthesize what you have read.  Include your personal responses to the readings. Question the text as you read. Write questions about things you don’t understand, things that make you think of your own learning, things that make you think of other articles or texts you have read, and especially things that you relate to your own teaching.  Your questions will support our discussions. Students will be required to respond to the following chapter readings: 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, & 15. These reflections will replace the final exam for this course. I will grade the reflections based on the following :

 

  • (a)Comprehension of the readings.  It should be clear that you have read the material thoroughly and that you understand the material. 

(b) Depth of response.  Your responses should clearly show that you have seriously considered the issues or concepts presented in the readings.  Although no specific length is required, it is not likely that you could write a response of much depth in less than1½ - 2 pages (double spaced; 12 point font).

(c)Timeliness.  Responses are due the class period for which they are assigned. Late responses will not be given full credit. Responses that are more than one week late will not be accepted. All reflections (“Response to Readings”) will be uploaded together via the “Assignments” link on Web CT. See course due dates/calendar for specific date.

 

  • Class Led  Online Discussions (16%) - Each student will be required to participate in discussions related to the text. Each student will lead two online discussion related to the assigned shared text. During these discussions, the student in charge will post many times to keep the discussion moving and on track. The purpose of this assignment is to allow students to reflect, explore, and dialogue with each other concerning topics and issues related to the readings. Discussions should be interactive and include activities that provoke discussion and raise further questions about the readings. Please refrain from summarizing the chapter; it is assumed that each student has done the reading. The course instructor will model this process. Class discussions will be assigned after the course starts. See course due dates/calendar.

 

  • Online Participation (14%) - Each student will be required to participate in online discussions. Using Web CT, students will be required to reply to each online discussion topic a minimum of 6 times. Online responses should be spaced apart, which allows you to interact with your peers more effectively. Please see the course calendar for online discussion dates and topics. Responses should provide insight into your thoughts and concerns regarding the topic or issue. One word responses and incomplete answers are unacceptable. Make sure your posts push the discussion forward. “Good point, Tom!” is an example of a less desirable post.  See Discussion Requirements for grading criteria.

 

  • Practicum (20%) - The practicum is an opportunity for you to apply the theory you have been accumulating to your work with an elementary/secondary student. Each person will select and work with one elementary student in reading/language arts for a minimum of 10-12 hours.  You will assess your student, set goals for the student’s literacy development, work with the student in those areas, and document the work you and the student do through lesson plans and reflections.

 

1.      Goalsfor the student should focus on the areas of language arts in which your student needs additional support.  You will identify these areas through observation, written assessments, and interactions with the student.  Set 2 specific goals (one for reading, one for writing), keeping in mind how you will develop lesson plans related to the goals and how you will assess whether the student achieved these goals.  If it is appropriate for your student, involve her/him in the goal-setting process. This could be as simple as asking what s/he would like to learn or get better at during the time you are there.  Keep in mind that the purpose of assessment is to guide instruction. This process should be documented in your lesson reflections (see below).

 

2.      Lesson plansdescribe what you will do, why you will do it, and how you will evaluate it.  Each practicum session should include 1) informal observation, 2) reading (shared, guided, and/or independent), and 3) writing (shared writing, guided, and/or independent). The writing goal should focus on the writing process rather than only on mechanics. Your goals and the first lesson plan will be evaluated by the instructor prior to implementation. You can email your first draft through Web CT email. You will also be discussing your practicum experience via the discussion board. This will allow you to receive feedback from your peers. If you have problems, please request additional assistance. 

 

3.      Lesson Reflections-After each session with your child, you will write a lesson reflection that describes the opportunities to learn which you provided for your student and how your student responded to them. The focus should be on the child and how the child responded. Be sure to include evidence. What did the child say/do? The student responses will provide evaluative information.   In order to capture accurate information about your thoughts and feelings that resulted from each session, lesson reflections should be written as soon as possible so you will not forget pertinent information. 

                                                                                            

4.      Personal Reflections- In this section, you will focus on YOU! You will describe the thoughts, feelings, joys, and concerns you had during the session and will share information about what you are learning about you as a teacher AND about teaching in general from this practicum experience.

 

The lesson plans, student work, lesson reflections, and personal reflections must be submitted together.  You will submit the final product to the “Assignment” link on Web CT.

 


Final Exam12/5/2011  na

Submission Format Policy

The lesson plans, student work, lesson reflections, and personal reflections must be submitted together.  You will submit the final product to the “Assignment” link on Web CT.



Note: You may not submit a paper for a grade in this class that already has been (or will be) submitted for a grade in another course, unless you obtain the explicit written permission of me and the other instructor involved in advance.

Late Paper Policy

 

Participation Policy (Read Welcome Letter on Course Content Page —Web CT/Blackboard)

  • Although the course requires a thorough understanding of the readings and assignments, online discussions will provide the basis for learning and assessment.
  • Because of the absence of in class collaboration and face-to-face communications, participation in the discussion boards is crucial to the successful completion of this course.

Plagiarism Policy Plagiarism is the use of someone else's thoughts, words, ideas, or lines of argument in your own work without appropriate documentation (a parenthetical citation at the end and a listing in "Works Cited")-whether you use that material in a quote, paraphrase, or summary. It is a theft of intellectual property and will not be tolerated, whether intentional or not.

Student Honor Creed

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

Students with Disabilities The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Safe Zones Statement The professor considers this classroom to be a place where you will be treated with respect as a human being - regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, political beliefs, age, or ability. Additionally, diversity of thought is appreciated and encouraged, provided you can agree to disagree. It is the professor's expectation that ALL students consider the classroom a safe environment.

Contacting your Instructor All instructors in the Department have voicemail in their offices and MWSU e-mail addresses. Make sure you add your instructor's phone number and e-mail address to both email and cell phone lists of contacts.

Attendance Requirements

 

Participation Policy (Read Welcome Letter on Course Content Page —Web CT)

  • Although the course requires a thorough understanding of the readings and assignments, online discussions will provide the basis for learning and assessment.
  • Because of the absence of in class collaboration and face-to-face communications, participation in the discussion boards is crucial to the successful completion of this course.

Other Policies

 

Plagiarism Statement:

 

Please noteBy enrolling in this course, the student expressly grants MSU a “limited right” in all intellectual property created by the student for the purpose of this course. 

The “limited right” shall include but shall not be limited to the right to reproduce the student’s work product in order to verify originality and authenticity, and for educational purposes.

 

 

  

Dr. Compton Hall of TWU graciously offered her syllabus and expertise to help with the creation of this course. This syllabus is patterned after her Foundations of Reading course.


Writing Proficiency Requirement All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.