MS Office for Community Policing and Crime Analysis

Course Details

Course Number: 3133  Section Number: x10

Fall 2011

Days & Times:

The instructor will be available on WebCT throughout the week.  If a student has a need for immediate assistance or a personal issue not directly related to the course curriculum contact the instructor via phone or at mstallo@hotmail.com.  (Please do not send course material or attachments to the hotmail account.)



Course Attachments

Textbooks

MSU Faculty Member
Mark Stallo   
view Profile »

Course Objectives

Using MS Office for Crime Analysis, Community Policing, and other Police Functions will focus on the following goals and objectives:

 

Crime Analysis

What is Analysis?

Different types of analysis are discussed

What is the crime analysis process?

Collecting internal and external data

Storing the data so it can be retrieved

Analysis through GIS and other software

Dissemination of information

Feedback

Building relationships

Crime analysis products

 

Microsoft Access
What is a database?

Entering data into a new table

Input Masks

Queries

Reports

Forms

Crime Analysis Tracking

Importing data/steps taken and types of data

Queries

Reports

 

Microsoft Excel

Overview of the book, sheets, cells, rows, columns, toolbars, menus, etc.

Moving around the spreadsheet

Entering data and formatting

Chart wizard and options

Dynamic linking

Using formulas for crime analysis

Sorting and Subtotals

Filtering and forms

Pivot Tables (Importing to MS Word)

Tactical Analysis

Concatenation of address information for Geographic Display

Times

 
Microsoft Word

Creating a crime bulletin

Header/Footer

Adding clip art, images

Linking a database to the bulletin

Adding a chart

Adding a map

Adding a suspect/arrestee or other photo

 

Microsoft PowerPoint

Demonstrating the steps necessary to create a crime presentation

Using fonts, images, charts, graphs, sounds, clips to improve presentation

Dynamic linking from other programs to continually update presentation


Course Expectations

There are four components of the MS Office suite that are focused on to conduct crime analysis and to make other operations within a police department more efficient. 

 

*First, MS Access can be used to collect information through data input or by importing data into the program.  Students will be shown how to automate the importing of data.  In addition, Access, as a database program, can be used to conduct analysis and create reports.  The entire concept of data warehousing will be discussed so those students can learn how data should be structured and stored.  Sample programs will be provided for the student.

 

*MS Excel is a spreadsheet program that can also be used to store and analyze data.  The Excel program can be used to create charts, statistical reports, and to analyze a variety of different types of data.  Students will walk away with a variety of formulas and ideas of how to analyze and compare data.  Students will be provided with a wide breath of sample Excel spreadsheets. 

 

*The MS Word program is used to capture the findings from the other software and put into a format that is easily understood.  Word is used to conduct dynamic linking to the

other applications so that changes occur instantaneously.  In addition, Word is used to create a variety of documents such as crime bulletins that can capture data, pictures, charts and other crime analysis data that is to be disseminated.

 

*The MS PowerPoint program is excellent for presentations to a variety of audiences.  The focus of the training will consist of taking the data that was analyzed in Access and Excel and presenting the results in an understandable format.  Students will learn how to link charts, word boxes, and organizational charts to their presentation.  They will also learn how pictures, art, and sound can enhance their presentation.

 

 

Exam I:          Will cover the concepts of Crime Analysis and Community Policing and MS Access Exercises.

 

Exam II:         Will cover the concepts of MS Excel


Grading Standards

Exams:           Exam I                                                                       100 points

                        Exam II                                                                       100 points

                        Exercises                                                                   200 points

                        Discussions                                                              100 points

 

The Semester Grade will be awarded according to the following scale:

 

            A         450-500 points

            B         400-449 points

C         350-399 points

            D         349 and below


Submission Format PolicyNote: You may not submit a paper for a grade in this class that already has been (or will be) submitted for a grade in another course, unless you obtain the explicit written permission of me and the other instructor involved in advance.

Plagiarism Policy Plagiarism is the use of someone else's thoughts, words, ideas, or lines of argument in your own work without appropriate documentation (a parenthetical citation at the end and a listing in "Works Cited")-whether you use that material in a quote, paraphrase, or summary. It is a theft of intellectual property and will not be tolerated, whether intentional or not.

Student Honor Creed

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

Students with Disabilities The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Safe Zones Statement The professor considers this classroom to be a place where you will be treated with respect as a human being - regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, political beliefs, age, or ability. Additionally, diversity of thought is appreciated and encouraged, provided you can agree to disagree. It is the professor's expectation that ALL students consider the classroom a safe environment.

Contacting your Instructor All instructors in the Department have voicemail in their offices and MWSU e-mail addresses. Make sure you add your instructor's phone number and e-mail address to both email and cell phone lists of contacts.

Attendance Requirements

Being involved and making a difference are important marks of a community service professional.  All assignment due dates will be posted throughout the course.  The assignments must be turned in on time.  Students must participate when discussing issues. 


Other Policies

The Criminal Justice Program's philosophy is to provide students with the opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skills, abilities, and sensitivities that will prepare them to work in criminal justice and related human service professions.  Much of the learning necessary to be successful in criminal justice is just as applicable to work in other public service and private sector professions.

 

            A.        Three-part Foundation

 

                        1.         Basic Skills - Reads, writes, performs arithmetic and                                                               mathematical operations, listens and speaks.

2.         Thinking Skills - Thinks creatively, makes decisions, problem solver, visualizes, and knows how to learn, and reasons.

            3.         Personal Qualities - Displays responsibility, self-esteem,                                                       sociability, self-management, and integrity.

 

            B.        Five Competencies

 

                        1.         Resources - Identifies, organizes, plans, and allocates                                                                       resources.

                        2.         Interpersonal - Works with others.

                        3.         Information - Acquires and uses information.

                        4.         Systems - Understands complex inter-relationships.

                        5.         Technology - Works with a variety of technologies.

 

In short, the Criminal Justice faculty wills emphasis the practice of professional behavior, which should give its graduates a decided advantage in locating, and retaining satisfying careers.


Writing Proficiency Requirement All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.