Introduction to Social Work

Course Details

Course Number: 2423  Section Number: 01

Spring 2011

Location: Martin Hall

Classroom Number: 106

Days & Times:

Monday, Wednesday and Friday 11 am



Course Attachments

Textbooks

MSU Faculty Member
Dr. Gary Fashimpar   
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Course Objectives

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

At the end of this course student should be able to:

  1. Discuss the mission of social work
  2. Describe and discuss the history of social welfare and social work in the United States.
  3. Identify the organizational settings where professional social work is practiced, the target            

       populations served, and the roles of social workers today.

  1. Describe and analyze in some depth the problems of diverse and special populations in the United States .
  2. Recognize the significance of human diversity and the differences among people and groups  created by biological, cultural and social factors. Discuss social work values of respect for individual, biological, and cultural differences.
  3. Recognize the interrelationships among social work practice, societal change, social         problems, social programs, and social welfare policy utilizing the social systems perspective, taking diversity into consideration.
  4. To identify differences between one’s own values and those of social work. Define appropriate ethical conduct in practice situations

Course Expectations

   

 

REQUIRED TEXT:Kirst- Ashman,K.(2010).Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare:Critical Thinking Perspectives (3rd ed.). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

 

Internet Resources:

An electronic version of the book is available for purchase at Cengage.com and includes free access to the student study guide.  The Cengage web site also has practice exams and learning tools.  You can access this site using the ISBN of your text.

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS:

1.    There will be three non-cumulative exams, including the final. Reading assignments are listed on the course outline. Attendance is critical to the accomplishment of the learning objectives.

2.    Standard grading is used: 90-100% = A; 80-89% = B; 70-79% = C; 60-69% = D; Below 60%= F.

 

3.    Volunteering:

a. Each student will volunteer at a social service agency. A list of possible sites will be provided in class.

b.  You are to volunteer for 20 hours.

c.  Notify the professor in writing, using the attached form, where and when you are volunteering, with the name and telephone number of the person who will be supervising you.

d. These 20 hours are to be completed no later than the due date on the course outline.

e.  You must request a signed statement from your supervisor that you have completed your 20 hours. This statement should be attached to your agency report and should be on agency stationary. This is to be stapled to your report.

f.  Credit for the reports will not be given until 20 hours of volunteer time are documented.

 

4.AGENCY REPORT ASSIGNMENT

 

The paper must be typed (double space). Please write each question and then follow the question with the answer.  Questions #13 & #14 should be very thorough and require some thought.Your paper will not be accepted without verification that you completed the 20 hour volunteer assignment. Incomplete grades will not be given for late assignments unless there is documented proof of a real emergency, therefore, get your hours completed and your paper finished by the due date.

 

 

Answer the following in at least two pages:

 

1. Name of agency and location.

2. Date agency established.

3. Original purpose for the agency. Has the mission changed?

4. Eligibility of its clients.

5. Sources of original funding. Are they the same today?

6. What is the goal of the agency?

7. What agencies does it work closely with?

8. Where do referrals come from?

9. How many clients were served last year?

10. What are the requirements for professional employment at the agency?

11. Who has the final word in decision making?

12. How does (or could) the agency use research?

13. Your impressions: What happened? What did you observe? Would you want to work in this type of setting?

14. What do you think it would be like to be a “real” client?

15. Are there social workers where you volunteered? If so, in what capacity? What are the qualifications of the people with whom you dealt?

 

 

Criteria for evaluation of agency reports:

 

Clarity, conciseness, and organization         25%       Completeness             25%

Support for conclusions                                25%       Writing mechanics      25%

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

5. Ethics Assignment: completed in class

 Students will be given a copy of the NASW code of ethics and a copy of the Code of Conduct which is   part of the social work licensing law in Texas.  Students will get in small groups and discuss the              similarities and differences in the two. The student must be present the day of the exercise to receive       credit. Attendance will be taken.

 

 

6.  Strengths Assessment and Treatment Plan:

     Students will form small groups in class and read a brief case summary.  They will list the strengths           and weaknesses of the clients in the summary.  They will write a treatment plan which will include            what each client will do and what the social worker will do and how ethics and social justice affected        the plan. They will evaluate how effective they think the treatment plan will be.  The student must be         present the day of the exercise to receive credit.

 

7.  Cooperation, Respect and Relationship Exercise:

Students will participate in two (2) exercises (tire tube and Alligator River story) followed by      processing the experience.  The exercises contrast social work skills and values including                      communication, cooperation and respect with judgment and the different results these create in             relationships.

 

8.  Identifying the client and ethical choices:

     Students read a case study and in small groups identify the client(s) and determine ethical choices for        practice.  They also determine a treatment plan for the case.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COURSE OUTLINE

 

 

 

               DATES

 

                                                   TOPICS

 

                           CHAPTERS

 

 

 

  • Group Exercise: Trust and Relationship
  • Group Exercise: Values
  • Class handout: Social Work Code of Ethics
  • Introduction VIDEO: What Do Social Workers Do?
  • Assignment: Students review N.A.S.W. website and explore the field of Social Work.(www.socialworkers.org)
  • Mission,ethics and purpose
  • Career Ladder & Licensure
  • Class handout: Texas Code of Conduct
  • Ethical Dilemmas discussion

 

 

 

 

 

Practice Exams

Chapter 1 & 2

 

 

 

  • Class handout: Generalist and Social Work Practice
  • Class handout: Social Assessment and Treatment planning

 

Practice Exam

Chapter 4

 

 

  • Social Welfare/Social Work History
  • Speaker: Roger Hinesh, Substance Abuse and A.A
  • Agency Volunteer Assignment Form Due!
  • Speaker: Lauren Hargrove,LBSW, Hospice

 

 

Practice Exam

Chapter 5

 

 

 

 

  • Class handout: Professional Roles
  • The practice of social work, values and ethics, dilemmas
  • In class assignment:Strengths Assessment and Treatment plan , evaluation of plan, Ethics

 

 

 

 

 

About Sept. 25 in Fall and Feb. 17 in Spring

 

 

 

  • Social Work Careers

 

  • EXAM I Covers Chapters 1,2,4,5,6

 

Practice exam

Chapter 6

 

 

  • Ethnic Sensitive practice, human diversity, empowerment
  • Power point on African Caribbean traditions
  • Speaker: Misty King,, Inheritance Adoptions, Birth parent counseling

 

Chapter 3

Ch. 3 Practice exam

 

 

  • Poverty, homelessness, Social justice and diversity
  • Video:Take it From Me
  • Social Class.
  • Speaker: Cindy Piper, LBSW, CPS Investigator, Child protection from abuse

 

Chapter 8

Ch. 8 practice exam

 

 

 

  • Social work and services for children and their families.
  • Speaker: Samantha Taggart, Presbyterian Children’s Home, Foster care
  • Speaker: Les Hungerford, LMSW Juvenile Probation, Adolescent probation services
  • Speakers: David Shipley LBSW, LPC, Lisa Little, LMSW , Courtney Cooner, Shunda Stanley , Headstart and school social work

 

Chapter 9 &14

Practice exams

 

About Nov. 2nd in Fall or Mar. 12th in Spring

 

 

  • EXAM II (covers Chapters 3,8,9,14)
  • Social Work and services for the Elderly
  • Speaker:Jessica Mayburry, Senior Care or Dustin Phillips, Midwestern Health Care, Geriatric social work

 

 

 

 

Chapter 10

Practice exams

 

 

 

 

  • Social work and services for people with Disabilities
  • Speaker: Linda Workman,LBSW, Group homes for MR
  • Speaker: Abbie Flinn LBSW Disability social work
  • Speaker: Jack Ramsey, VA, LCSW, Veterans services

 

Chapter 11

Ch. 11 practice exam

 

 

 

 

  • Speaker:Bill Jennings, LCSW or Sherry Harrington LMSW Health social work

 

 

 

 

 

  • Social work and services in Health care
  • Speaker:Becky Tyree Tolleson, LBSW, N.T. Rehab, Early Childhhod Intervention

 

Chapter 12

Ch. 12 practice exam

 

 

TBA

 

  • Thanksgiving Break or Spring Break
  • Social Work and services in Mental Health
  • Speaker: Dee Lambert LMSW Childrens mental health
  • Speaker: Byron WebbLMSW Adult mental health
  • Speaker: Becky Bell,JAPA, Victims restitution
  • Speaker: Pam Moss LBSW, LPC Career development

 

 

Chapter 13

Ch. 13 practice exam

 

Nov. 23 agency report due

 

  • Speaker: Sherry Janes LBSW, MHMR, Addictions
  • Speaker: Kristi Skelton APS Adult protection services
  • Identify the client and ethical treatment planning exercise

AGENCY REPORT & STATEMENT FROM SUPERVISOR DUE TODAY!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

FINAL EXAM – Covers Chapters 10,11,12,13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

At the end of this course student should be able to:

  1. Discuss the mission of social work
  2. Describe and discuss the history of social welfare and social work in the United States.
  3. Identify the organizational settings where professional social work is practiced, the target            

       populations served, and the roles of social workers today.

  1. Describe and analyze in some depth the problems of diverse and special populations in the United States .
  2. Recognize the significance of human diversity and the differences among people and groups  created by biological, cultural and social factors. Discuss social work values of respect for individual, biological, and cultural differences.
  3. Recognize the interrelationships among social work practice, societal change, social         problems, social programs, and social welfare policy utilizing the social systems perspective, taking diversity into consideration.
  4. To identify differences between one’s own values and those of social work. Define appropriate ethical conduct in practice situations

Grading Standards

 

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS:

1.    There will be three non-cumulative exams, including the final. Reading assignments are listed on the course outline. Attendance is critical to the accomplishment of the learning objectives.

2.    Standard grading is used: 90-100% = A; 80-89% = B; 70-79% = C; 60-69% = D; Below 60%= F.

 

3.    Volunteering:

a. Each student will volunteer at a social service agency. A list of possible sites will be provided in class.

b.  You are to volunteer for 20 hours.

c.  Notify the professor in writing, using the attached form, where and when you are volunteering, with the name and telephone number of the person who will be supervising you.

d. These 20 hours are to be completed no later than the due date on the course outline.

e.  You must request a signed statement from your supervisor that you have completed your 20 hours. This statement should be attached to your agency report and should be on agency stationary. This is to be stapled to your report.

f.  Credit for the reports will not be given until 20 hours of volunteer time are documented.

 

4.AGENCY REPORT ASSIGNMENT

 

The paper must be typed (double space). Please write each question and then follow the question with the answer.  Questions #13 & #14 should be very thorough and require some thought.Your paper will not be accepted without verification that you completed the 20 hour volunteer assignment. Incomplete grades will not be given for late assignments unless there is documented proof of a real emergency, therefore, get your hours completed and your paper finished by the due date.

 

 

Answer the following in at least two pages:

 

1. Name of agency and location.

2. Date agency established.

3. Original purpose for the agency. Has the mission changed?

4. Eligibility of its clients.

5. Sources of original funding. Are they the same today?

6. What is the goal of the agency?

7. What agencies does it work closely with?

8. Where do referrals come from?

9. How many clients were served last year?

10. What are the requirements for professional employment at the agency?

11. Who has the final word in decision making?

12. How does (or could) the agency use research?

13. Your impressions: What happened? What did you observe? Would you want to work in this type of setting?

14. What do you think it would be like to be a “real” client?

15. Are there social workers where you volunteered? If so, in what capacity? What are the qualifications of the people with whom you dealt?

 

 

Criteria for evaluation of agency reports:

 

Clarity, conciseness, and organization         25%       Completeness             25%

Support for conclusions                                25%       Writing mechanics      25%

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

5. Ethics Assignment: completed in class

 Students will be given a copy of the NASW code of ethics and a copy of the Code of Conduct which is   part of the social work licensing law in Texas.  Students will get in small groups and discuss the              similarities and differences in the two. The student must be present the day of the exercise to receive       credit. Attendance will be taken.

 

 

6.  Strengths Assessment and Treatment Plan:

     Students will form small groups in class and read a brief case summary.  They will list the strengths           and weaknesses of the clients in the summary.  They will write a treatment plan which will include            what each client will do and what the social worker will do and how ethics and social justice affected        the plan. They will evaluate how effective they think the treatment plan will be.  The student must be         present the day of the exercise to receive credit.

 

7.  Cooperation, Respect and Relationship Exercise:

Students will participate in two (2) exercises (tire tube and Alligator River story) followed by      processing the experience.  The exercises contrast social work skills and values including                      communication, cooperation and respect with judgment and the different results these create in             relationships.

 

8.  Identifying the client and ethical choices:

     Students read a case study and in small groups identify the client(s) and determine ethical choices for        practice.  They also determine a treatment plan for the case.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COURSE OUTLINE

 

 

 

               DATES

 

                                                   TOPICS

 

                           CHAPTERS

 

 

 

  • Group Exercise: Trust and Relationship
  • Group Exercise: Values
  • Class handout: Social Work Code of Ethics
  • Introduction VIDEO: What Do Social Workers Do?
  • Assignment: Students review N.A.S.W. website and explore the field of Social Work.(www.socialworkers.org)
  • Mission,ethics and purpose
  • Career Ladder & Licensure
  • Class handout: Texas Code of Conduct
  • Ethical Dilemmas discussion

 

 

 

 

 

Practice Exams

Chapter 1 & 2

 

 

 

  • Class handout: Generalist and Social Work Practice
  • Class handout: Social Assessment and Treatment planning

 

Practice Exam

Chapter 4

 

 

  • Social Welfare/Social Work History
  • Speaker: Roger Hinesh, Substance Abuse and A.A
  • Agency Volunteer Assignment Form Due!
  • Speaker: Lauren Hargrove,LBSW, Hospice

 

 

Practice Exam

Chapter 5

 

 

 

 

  • Class handout: Professional Roles
  • The practice of social work, values and ethics, dilemmas
  • In class assignment:Strengths Assessment and Treatment plan , evaluation of plan, Ethics

 

 

 

 

 

About Sept. 25 in Fall and Feb. 17 in Spring

 

 

 

  • Social Work Careers

 

  • EXAM I Covers Chapters 1,2,4,5,6

 

Practice exam

Chapter 6

 

 

  • Ethnic Sensitive practice, human diversity, empowerment
  • Power point on African Caribbean traditions
  • Speaker: Misty King,, Inheritance Adoptions, Birth parent counseling

 

Chapter 3

Ch. 3 Practice exam

 

 

  • Poverty, homelessness, Social justice and diversity
  • Video:Take it From Me
  • Social Class.
  • Speaker: Cindy Piper, LBSW, CPS Investigator, Child protection from abuse

 

Chapter 8

Ch. 8 practice exam

 

 

 

  • Social work and services for children and their families.
  • Speaker: Samantha Taggart, Presbyterian Children’s Home, Foster care
  • Speaker: Les Hungerford, LMSW Juvenile Probation, Adolescent probation services
  • Speakers: David Shipley LBSW, LPC, Lisa Little, LMSW , Courtney Cooner, Shunda Stanley , Headstart and school social work

 

Chapter 9 &14

Practice exams

 

About Nov. 2nd in Fall or Mar. 12th in Spring

 

 

  • EXAM II (covers Chapters 3,8,9,14)
  • Social Work and services for the Elderly
  • Speaker:Jessica Mayburry, Senior Care or Dustin Phillips, Midwestern Health Care, Geriatric social work

 

 

 

 

Chapter 10

Practice exams

 

 

 

 

  • Social work and services for people with Disabilities
  • Speaker: Linda Workman,LBSW, Group homes for MR
  • Speaker: Abbie Flinn LBSW Disability social work
  • Speaker: Jack Ramsey, VA, LCSW, Veterans services

 

Chapter 11

Ch. 11 practice exam

 

 

 

 

  • Speaker:Bill Jennings, LCSW or Sherry Harrington LMSW Health social work

 

 

 

 

 

  • Social work and services in Health care
  • Speaker:Becky Tyree Tolleson, LBSW, N.T. Rehab, Early Childhhod Intervention

 

Chapter 12

Ch. 12 practice exam

 

 

TBA

 

  • Thanksgiving Break or Spring Break
  • Social Work and services in Mental Health
  • Speaker: Dee Lambert LMSW Childrens mental health
  • Speaker: Byron WebbLMSW Adult mental health
  • Speaker: Becky Bell,JAPA, Victims restitution
  • Speaker: Pam Moss LBSW, LPC Career development

 

 

Chapter 13

Ch. 13 practice exam

 

Nov. 23 agency report due

 

  • Speaker: Sherry Janes LBSW, MHMR, Addictions
  • Speaker: Kristi Skelton APS Adult protection services
  • Identify the client and ethical treatment planning exercise

AGENCY REPORT & STATEMENT FROM SUPERVISOR DUE TODAY!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

FINAL EXAM – Covers Chapters 10,11,12,13

 

 

 


Final Exam11/8/2010  10:30 am

Submission Format PolicyNote: You may not submit a paper for a grade in this class that already has been (or will be) submitted for a grade in another course, unless you obtain the explicit written permission of me and the other instructor involved in advance.

Late Paper Policy

 

Absence Policy

If an examination is missed due to an unexcused absence, the student will receive a score of 10% less for that exam. If the exam is missed due to an officially excused absence, a makeup will be arranged. An absence is considered officially excused if a student:

a.  presents a written excuse from a physician or Midwestern State University infirmary, or

     b.  presents written evidence of attending a mandatory university function (sports, band, etc.), or

c.  presents a written excuse from a physician for a dependent child’s illness, or

d.  receives permission from the instructor in advance of the absence.

Students are expected to be present for a minimum of 75% of quest speakers over fields of practice.  Credit of 1% on an exam will be given each time a student is present for a speaker.


Plagiarism Policy Plagiarism is the use of someone else's thoughts, words, ideas, or lines of argument in your own work without appropriate documentation (a parenthetical citation at the end and a listing in "Works Cited")-whether you use that material in a quote, paraphrase, or summary. It is a theft of intellectual property and will not be tolerated, whether intentional or not.

Student Honor Creed

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

Students with Disabilities The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Safe Zones Statement The professor considers this classroom to be a place where you will be treated with respect as a human being - regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, political beliefs, age, or ability. Additionally, diversity of thought is appreciated and encouraged, provided you can agree to disagree. It is the professor's expectation that ALL students consider the classroom a safe environment.

Contacting your Instructor All instructors in the Department have voicemail in their offices and MWSU e-mail addresses. Make sure you add your instructor's phone number and e-mail address to both email and cell phone lists of contacts.

Attendance Requirements

 

CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR: Professional Training                                                                           Students are expected to attend all classes, complete assigned readings and participate in class discussions. Attendance is critical to the accomplishment of the learning objectives. When the professor starts speaking, the class members will become quiet. Rude or inappropriate behavior will not be tolerated. With the exception of an occasionaltardy arrival to class, students are expected to be in class and on time. Students shall not arrive late on days when there are invited speakers.

            As a developmental step in the process of professionalism, students are expected to abide by the N.A.S.W. code of ethics and behave in a respectful manner to fellow students and faculty. Student’s behaviors maybe discussed among social work faculty and the Chairr of the social work program. A


Writing Proficiency Requirement All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.