Detailed Information for Sugumaran Narayanan

Dr. Sugumaran Narayanan 
Political Science
 » Assistant Professor
Office Location
O'Donohoe Hall 201 
Phone
Voice: (940) 397-4563
Fax: (940) 397-4865
 
 

Contact Information

sugumaran.narayanan@mwsu.edu

My Websites

Dr Sugumaran Narayanan's Home Page

Interests

  • International and internal conflict, Alliance Behavior, Asia Pacific Politics
  • American Foreign Policy, American Executive

Course Information

  Semester Course #    Section Course Name Location Days / Times
Details Fall 2014 POLS 6043  170  Graduate Seminar: Civil Wars    O'Donohoe Hall 209

POLS 6043-170: GRADUATE SEMINAR: CIVIL WARS
FALL 2014


Instructor:  Suguman Narayanan Ph.D.

Class Meets at: PY 209
Time:   W 5.30-8.20 pm

Office Hours:  T:  1.00-2.00 pm; 5.00-6.00 pm; 7.20-8.20 pm
W: 4.00-5.30 pm; 8.20-9.20 pm
R:  1.00-2.00 pm; 5.00-6.00 pm; 7.20-8.20 pm
F:  4.00-5.30 pm
Office Location: Room 201 O’Donohoe Hall

Email:   sugumaran.narayanan@mwsu.edu
Official Homepage: http://faculty.mwsu.edu/politicalscience/sugumaran.narayanan


Course Description

This course is a graduate study of the major theories and ideas in the study of worldwide civil wars and the politics of conflict. It covers both the qualitative and quantitative approaches to the study of civil wars. If time permits we will also analyze articles employing formal or game theory. It will cover theories and ideas of quite a number of different scholars and views.

Course Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students are required to have a grasp of the above. At the end of the course students are required to be able to identify key concepts and terms in civil war study. Further, the student should exhibit an ability to apply these in explaining development within the field. In addition, students are also required to understand and analyze political events and trends. Hopefully, what has been learned may give you a better understanding of what happens within the country and outside, and the questions posed by political scientists, etc. The reading assignments should prepare you for related graduate level courses in political science and government, and PhD level courses. The writing assignment/term paper is designed to improve both your scholarly-writing skills as well as research skills. At the end of the semester, students must have at least a minimal, basic understanding of how to apply statistical packages to analyze civil wars and political conflict. Since this is a theoretical course, students should not expect what has been learned here to substantially aid them in a profession that requires field training, such as in a federal government policy job.

Required Texts

Required books:

Statecraft (Online resource)

Writing in Political Science: A Practical Guide, 4th edition or later. Diane Schmidt (Required by the Political Science department)

Supplementary/Reference:
Spectrum of Terror. By R. Hrair Dekmejian. La edition. CQ Publishers.

Understanding Ethnic Conflict. Taras and Ganguly. 4th ed. 2010

Triangulating Peace. 2001. Bruce Russett and John Oneal. Norton Series.

Essential Readings in World Politics. 2008. 3rd edition or later. Karen Mingst and Jack Snyder. Norton Series.

World Politics: Trend and Transformation by Charles W Kegley, Jr. Wadsworth Publishing. La Edition.

Handbook of War Studies II. 2000. Manus Midlarsky (ed).

Other Supplementary Materials

The instructor will recommend books, articles, and other reading materials in the course of the semester. A list of journal articles and books will be provided.

Some Important Expectations

Each member of the class will show due respect for one another. Ideas may be challenged, but individual attacks are unacceptable. I will not tolerate rude and/or abusive language in class. A student who makes fun of the instructor directly or indirectly, for example, in the form of a slang or a jargon will be dealt with seriously.  I will also not tolerate any other unacceptable behavior in class, for example, the habit of talking to others when the instructor is talking, or while another student is engaged in a discussion with the instructor. Whistling while class is in session is another example of distracting behavior. It is impossible to list all disturbing behavior so it is naturally expected of you, as members of institutions of higher learning to understand what constitutes appropriate behavior or otherwise. In keeping with the theme of respect, all students must adhere to the code of academic conduct in order to maintain appropriate and acceptable conduct when class is in session (Please read the Student Handbook).

In addition, students are also required to understand the seriousness of plagiarism in the academic world. Failure to do so, as evidenced by plagiarism or other honor violations will result in a failing grade or more serious consequences.

Note: No person will be discriminated based on age, race, religion, national origin, sex, or disability. (Any student with a disability certified by the University disability office should notify the instructor immediately for proper arrangements to be made).

Course Evaluation

Examination  30%

Attendance 20% (You are allowed one absence). For every additional absence, 5 percentage points will be deducted from the overall attendance points.
Attendance will be taken regularly. If you are late or missed class, it is your responsibility to find out what announcements you missed. Although I sometimes repeat important announcements, it is solely your responsibility to find out missed information. The instructor is not responsible for repeating announcements already made in class, nor respond to emails about missed announcements. The instructor reserves the right to deduct attendance points for students who are late for class or enter and leave class while lecture is in session. You are at a risk of losing some of your total points if you are unable to provide a correct answer when asked in class or if you did not prepare for assignment/class readings for class discussions.

Participation  30% Points will be awarded for quality class participation only. Points will be deducted for negative participation.

 

Oral Presentation 20%

Term Paper Points will not be awarded for term papers. However failure to complete the paper or if the term paper is not up to the par, points will be deducted from the overall total points. The paper must be based on the topic of the oral presentation. The objective is to ensure ability to write a quality graduate paper and the ability to understand search techniques, correct style of scholarly writing, avoiding plagiarism, etc.  Papers must adhere strictly to requirements- Page numbering, Paper length,  Introduction and Conclusion, Scholarly style, stapled (not clips), and not late. Failure to follow this can result in either reduced paper grade or fail (Will be discussed in greater detail in class).


Note: The instructor reserves the right to deduct points from the overall/total points for students who violate any part of the “Some Important Expectations” section above. There may or may not be prior warning about losing points.   


Make-ups

Make-ups for exams, assignments, presentations, and term papers will only be given if you miss the deadline due to official reasons, for example, a medical emergency. It will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Official proof is required. The same requirements apply to term papers.

Course Overview

Lecture notes and reading assignments are based on the following. This serves as a general outline of the course topics and flow. You should expect some modifications.

1:  Introduction. What is politics? Government and its functions. Ideologies    and forms of governments.

2: Contending theories of international politics: Realism, Liberalism, and Idealism. Basic ideas of Morgenthau, Mearsheimer, Fukuyama, and Wilson, and precursors to paradigms like Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Refer to portions of chapters 1 and 2 in the Russett book.

3:      Power Politics: the Morgenthau reading (Balance of Power), the Mearsheimer reading.  
Introduction to Civil Wars—Types, Schools of Thoughts, etc.
How are the above connected to civil wars. 

4:      Intro to Civil Wars (cont’d).
Wendt, Alexander. “Anarchy is What States Make of it” (Available online: International Organization, Spring 1992, Vol 42 Issue 2).
Onset of Civil Wars

5:  Democratic Peace Theory/Liberal Peace Theory and international conflict    (Ch 11 in the Russett book).  
  Is there civil peace? Democracy and civil war (the Hegre et al article).

6:  The Clash of Civilizations. The COC and onset of civil wars.

7:  Ethnicity, Culture, Religion and Civil War

8:   Terrorism
  Islam and Civil War
  “The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism,” in American      Political Science Review 2003 August, 97:3

9:  Asian Civil Wars


Readings
:
Instructor Notes/Power Points

Themner and Wallensteen 2011: “Armed Conflict”

Dixon 2009: “What Causes Civil Wars?”

Narayanan and DeRouen 2010: “The Onset of Civil War”

Gurr 1994: “People Against States”

Fearon and Laitin 2003: “Ethnicity, Insurgency, and Civil War”

Collier and Hoeffler 2002: “Greed and Grievance in Civil War”

Ross 2004: “What Do We Know about Natural Resources and Civil War”

Morgenthau: “Politics Among Nations”/”Six Principles of Political Realism”

Mearsheimer 2001: “The Tragedy of Great Power Politics”

Hegre et al 2002: “Is there Civil Peace?”

Huntington 1993/1996: “Clash of Civilizations: Remaking of World Order”

Toft 2007: “Getting Religion: The Puzzling Case of Islam and Civil War”

Pape 2003: “The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism,” in American      Political Science Review 2003 August, 97:3


Websites to Look at (to help you understand the subject):

Peace Research Institute Norway: www.prio.no

The Correlates of War website: www.correlatesofwar.org

Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University: http://www.pcr.uu.se/
(for the datasets, http://www.pcr.uu.se/data/)

 

Note:

Week 14: Thanksgiving Break (November 26-28; return December 1).

  Last day of classes for all: Friday, December 5, 2014. Last day of class for    this class, Wednesday December 3, 2014.

 

 

Details Fall 2014 POLS 1333  105  American Government    O'Donohoe Hall 200

POLS 1333: AMERICAN GOVERNMENT I
FALL 2014


Instructor:  Suguman Narayanan Ph.D.

Class Meets at: PY 200
Time:   TR 2.00-3.20 pm and 6.00-7.20 pm

Office Hours:  T:  1.00-2.00 pm; 5.00-6.00 pm; 7.20-8.20 pm
W: 4.00-5.30 pm; 8.20-9.20 pm
R:  1.00-2.00 pm; 5.00-6.00 pm; 7.20-8.20 pm
F:  4.00-5.30 pm
Office Location: Room 201 O’Donohoe Hall

Email:   sugumaran.narayanan@mwsu.edu
Official Homepage: http://faculty.mwsu.edu/politicalscience/sugumaran.narayanan

Course Description
This is the first of two parts of the introductory course to the study of American Government. This is a course in American politics where all areas of the study of American politics will be covered separately but without losing the connection between them. What does the nation owe you?  What do you owe her?  Do you have a say in what government does?  This course examines a wide range of U.S. public policy issues with direct impact upon you as a political science student, citizen, consumer, and individual.  Specific topics and cases will be examined to stimulate a greater understanding of the complexity involved in the art and science of politics. This course will also briefly compare American government with governments of other countries. In examining both historic and current policy arenas, some basic questions will be employed:
• Role of democracy.  Are there limits? How are we different from other governments? What about Texas?
• The influence of history on the federal and state governments.
• The impact of federalism. Are other countries different? What about Texas?
• We have freedom of choice in elections. Then how come many of us are unhappy with elected representatives? 
• Who is leading whom? What is leading whom? Who is leading what? – Media, political parties, interest groups, public opinion, and elections.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students are required to have a grasp of the above. At the end of the course students are required to be able to identify key concepts and terms in American government.  Further, the student should exhibit an ability to apply these in explaining development within the field. In addition, students are also required to understand and analyze political events and trends. Hopefully, what has been learned may give you a better understanding of what happens in your everyday life, for example, when you pay taxes, when you elect representatives, the questions posed by political scientists, etc. The reading assignments should prepare you for higher level courses in political science and government. The writing assignment/term paper is designed to improve both your scholarly writing skills as well as research skills.

Required Texts

1. Open to Debate: An Introduction to US Government and Politics. By Joseph Braunwarth and Marcus Stadelmann NSS Press (This is a CD. Required to purchase new, unused CD only).

2. Government & Politics of Texas, A Comparative View. By Gary M Halter. La Edition. McGraw Hill Publishing.

3. Writing in Political Science: A Practical Guide. La Edition. Diane Schmidt. Pearson Longman Publishing Company.

Supplementary Texts
There are no supplementary texts for this class. This will be substituted with weekly reading materials which will be announced in class or sent to you via email. The instructor will recommend books, articles, and other reading materials (e.g. court cases) in the course of the semester.

Some Important Expectations
Each member of the class will show due respect for one another. Ideas may be challenged, but individual attacks are unacceptable. I will not tolerate rude and/or abusive language in class. A student who makes fun of the instructor directly or indirectly, for example, in the form of a slang or a jargon will be dealt with seriously.  I will also not tolerate any other unacceptable behavior in class, for example, the habit of talking to others when the instructor is talking, or while another student is engaged in a discussion with the instructor. I refer to any form of participation which are negatively distracting, inappropriate, or rude, negative participation. Students who commit negative participation are at risk of losing some of the total points and face other appropriate actions. Besides talking to others when the instructor is talking or when class discussion is going on, other examples of negative participations are sleeping in class, whistling, doing work not related to current class session, unnecessarily grinning, and unnecessarily giggling. If you are grinning or giggling when the entire class is not sharing a joke, you may be busy conducting negative non-verbal communication with other students, reading/sending text messages, or other undesirable conduct. In any case these behaviors are considered negative participation. It is impossible to list all disturbing behavior so it is naturally expected of you, as members of institutions of higher learning to understand what constitutes appropriate behavior or otherwise. Because there is a long list of negative behaviors, whenever there is a dispute on what constitutes negative participation, the instructor reserves the right to decide. In keeping with the theme of respect, all students must adhere to the code of academic conduct in order to maintain appropriate and acceptable conduct when class is in session (Please read the Student Handbook).

In addition, students are also required to understand the seriousness of plagiarism in the academic world. Failure to do so, as evidenced by plagiarism will result in a failing grade or more serious consequences. Other honor violations such as cheating and the like will also result in a failing grade or more serious consequences.

Note: No person will be discriminated based on age, race, religion, national origin, sex, or disability. (Any student with a disability certified by the University disability office should notify the instructor immediately for proper arrangements to be made).


Course Evaluation

Exam 1      30%
Exam 2      30%
(Please refer to “Important Exam Rules”
in my official homepage).

Attendance 20% You are allowed one absence. For every additional absence, 3 percentage points will be deducted from the overall attendance points. Attendance will be taken at random. If you are late or missed class, it is your responsibility to find out what announcements you missed. Although I sometimes repeat important announcements, it is solely your responsibility to find out missed information. The instructor is not responsible for repeating announcements already made in class, nor respond to emails about missed announcements. The instructor reserves the right to deduct attendance points for students who are late for class or enter and leave class while lecture is in session. You are at a risk of losing some of your total points if you are unable to provide a correct answer when asked in class or if you did not prepare for assignment/class readings for class discussions.

Term Paper/Other expectations 10% An assignment connected to literature review and bibliography for the writing of a scholarly paper. The objective is not to ensure ability to write an entire paper but the ability to understand search techniques, correct style of scholarly writing, avoiding plagiarism, etc.  Papers must adhere strictly to requirements- Page numbering, paper length, “Introduction” and “Conclusion”, scholarly style, stapled (not clips), and not late. Failure to follow this can result in either reduced paper grade or fail (Will be discussed in greater detail in class). Please refer to “Term Paper Rules” in my official homepage.

Online s: 10%

Participation: Participation is graded on a demerit point system. Students do not gain points for participation instead will lose points from the total points if they do not participate. An integral part of this class is discussion on movies/documentaries/news clips, on political issues and debates, and on assigned reading assignments. Failure to participate will result in loss of points.


Note: The instructor reserves the right to deduct points from the overall/total points for students who are late for class. The instructor reserves the right to deduct points from the overall/total points for students who violate any portion of class policies. The instructor reserves the right to deduct points from the overall/total points for students who fail to answer questions on reading assignments. Up to 50% of the overall/total points may be deducted for violations but any percentage of points may be deducted from attendance points or term paper points for violations. There may or may not be prior warning about losing points.   
   

Make-ups
Make-up exams will only be given if you miss an examination due to official reasons, for
example, a medical emergency, death of an immediate family member, a court order, or representing the university in official university events. Official proof is required. If your excuse does not fall under one of these categories, it is recommended that you produce a copy of a police report or the equivalent to prove the validity of the incident. It will be on a case-by-case basis. Official proof is required.

Course Overview

This serves as a general outline of the course topics and flow. You should expect some modifications. There will be video screenings of movies that have substantial political content. There may be a guest lecture in the middle of the semester. Another guest lecture may be somewhere around the end of the semester.

Week 1: Chapter 1: Introduction. What is politics? Government and its functions

Week 2: Ideologies: Democracy, Communism, Socialism, and Libertarianism.  Where are we in the continuum?

Week 3:            Chapter 11: The Legislature: The different legislative systems of the world.
                          Comparison with the American system.

Week 4:            Chapter 12: The Executive: The different executive systems of the world.
                          Comparison with the American system.

Week 5: Political Culture

Week 6: Guest Lecture

Week 7: Chapter 2: The U.S. Constitution.

Week 8: The U.S. Constitution as compared to the Texas Constitution. What are the main    differences and similarities.
  Chapter 8: Political Parties in the United States.

Week 9: Political Parties in the United States (cont’d). Parties in Texas

Week 10: Chapters 6, 9, and 10: Public Opinion, Elections, and the Media 

Week11:            Public Opinion, Elections, and the Media (cont’d)

Week 12: Chapter 7: Interest Groups

Week 13: The U.S. Judiciary. How is the American judiciary different from the
British judiciary.

Week 14: Judiciary (cont’d)
  Thanksgiving Break (November 26-28; return December 1).
 


Week 15: Chapter 5: Federalism.
  Overview/Make-ups/ 2 Review
  Last day of classes for all: Friday, December 5, 2014. Last day of class for    this class, Thursday December 4, 2014.

Week 16: Final Examination

Details Fall 2014 POLS 1333  180  American Government    O'Donohoe Hall 200

POLS 1333: AMERICAN GOVERNMENT I
FALL 2014


Instructor:  Suguman Narayanan Ph.D.

Class Meets at: PY 200
Time:   TR 2.00-3.20 pm and 6.00-7.20 pm

Office Hours:  T:  1.00-2.00 pm; 5.00-6.00 pm; 7.20-8.20 pm
W: 4.00-5.30 pm; 8.20-9.20 pm
R:  1.00-2.00 pm; 5.00-6.00 pm; 7.20-8.20 pm
F:  4.00-5.30 pm
Office Location: Room 201 O’Donohoe Hall

Email:   sugumaran.narayanan@mwsu.edu
Official Homepage: http://faculty.mwsu.edu/politicalscience/sugumaran.narayanan

Course Description
This is the first of two parts of the introductory course to the study of American Government. This is a course in American politics where all areas of the study of American politics will be covered separately but without losing the connection between them. What does the nation owe you?  What do you owe her?  Do you have a say in what government does?  This course examines a wide range of U.S. public policy issues with direct impact upon you as a political science student, citizen, consumer, and individual.  Specific topics and cases will be examined to stimulate a greater understanding of the complexity involved in the art and science of politics. This course will also briefly compare American government with governments of other countries. In examining both historic and current policy arenas, some basic questions will be employed:
• Role of democracy.  Are there limits? How are we different from other governments? What about Texas?
• The influence of history on the federal and state governments.
• The impact of federalism. Are other countries different? What about Texas?
• We have freedom of choice in elections. Then how come many of us are unhappy with elected representatives? 
• Who is leading whom? What is leading whom? Who is leading what? – Media, political parties, interest groups, public opinion, and elections.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students are required to have a grasp of the above. At the end of the course students are required to be able to identify key concepts and terms in American government.  Further, the student should exhibit an ability to apply these in explaining development within the field. In addition, students are also required to understand and analyze political events and trends. Hopefully, what has been learned may give you a better understanding of what happens in your everyday life, for example, when you pay taxes, when you elect representatives, the questions posed by political scientists, etc. The reading assignments should prepare you for higher level courses in political science and government. The writing assignment/term paper is designed to improve both your scholarly writing skills as well as research skills.

Required Texts

1. Open to Debate: An Introduction to US Government and Politics. By Joseph Braunwarth and Marcus Stadelmann NSS Press (This is a CD. Required to purchase new, unused CD only).

2. Government & Politics of Texas, A Comparative View. By Gary M Halter. La Edition. McGraw Hill Publishing.

3. Writing in Political Science: A Practical Guide. La Edition. Diane Schmidt. Pearson Longman Publishing Company.

Supplementary Texts
There are no supplementary texts for this class. This will be substituted with weekly reading materials which will be announced in class or sent to you via email. The instructor will recommend books, articles, and other reading materials (e.g. court cases) in the course of the semester.

Some Important Expectations
Each member of the class will show due respect for one another. Ideas may be challenged, but individual attacks are unacceptable. I will not tolerate rude and/or abusive language in class. A student who makes fun of the instructor directly or indirectly, for example, in the form of a slang or a jargon will be dealt with seriously.  I will also not tolerate any other unacceptable behavior in class, for example, the habit of talking to others when the instructor is talking, or while another student is engaged in a discussion with the instructor. I refer to any form of participation which are negatively distracting, inappropriate, or rude, negative participation. Students who commit negative participation are at risk of losing some of the total points and face other appropriate actions. Besides talking to others when the instructor is talking or when class discussion is going on, other examples of negative participations are sleeping in class, whistling, doing work not related to current class session, unnecessarily grinning, and unnecessarily giggling. If you are grinning or giggling when the entire class is not sharing a joke, you may be busy conducting negative non-verbal communication with other students, reading/sending text messages, or other undesirable conduct. In any case these behaviors are considered negative participation. It is impossible to list all disturbing behavior so it is naturally expected of you, as members of institutions of higher learning to understand what constitutes appropriate behavior or otherwise. Because there is a long list of negative behaviors, whenever there is a dispute on what constitutes negative participation, the instructor reserves the right to decide. In keeping with the theme of respect, all students must adhere to the code of academic conduct in order to maintain appropriate and acceptable conduct when class is in session (Please read the Student Handbook).

In addition, students are also required to understand the seriousness of plagiarism in the academic world. Failure to do so, as evidenced by plagiarism will result in a failing grade or more serious consequences. Other honor violations such as cheating and the like will also result in a failing grade or more serious consequences.

Note: No person will be discriminated based on age, race, religion, national origin, sex, or disability. (Any student with a disability certified by the University disability office should notify the instructor immediately for proper arrangements to be made).


Course Evaluation

Exam 1      30%
Exam 2      30%
(Please refer to “Important Exam Rules”
in my official homepage).

Attendance 20% You are allowed one absence. For every additional absence, 3 percentage points will be deducted from the overall attendance points. Attendance will be taken at random. If you are late or missed class, it is your responsibility to find out what announcements you missed. Although I sometimes repeat important announcements, it is solely your responsibility to find out missed information. The instructor is not responsible for repeating announcements already made in class, nor respond to emails about missed announcements. The instructor reserves the right to deduct attendance points for students who are late for class or enter and leave class while lecture is in session. You are at a risk of losing some of your total points if you are unable to provide a correct answer when asked in class or if you did not prepare for assignment/class readings for class discussions.

Term Paper/Other expectations 10% An assignment connected to literature review and bibliography for the writing of a scholarly paper. The objective is not to ensure ability to write an entire paper but the ability to understand search techniques, correct style of scholarly writing, avoiding plagiarism, etc.  Papers must adhere strictly to requirements- Page numbering, paper length, “Introduction” and “Conclusion”, scholarly style, stapled (not clips), and not late. Failure to follow this can result in either reduced paper grade or fail (Will be discussed in greater detail in class). Please refer to “Term Paper Rules” in my official homepage.

Online s: 10%

Participation: Participation is graded on a demerit point system. Students do not gain points for participation instead will lose points from the total points if they do not participate. An integral part of this class is discussion on movies/documentaries/news clips, on political issues and debates, and on assigned reading assignments. Failure to participate will result in loss of points.


Note: The instructor reserves the right to deduct points from the overall/total points for students who are late for class. The instructor reserves the right to deduct points from the overall/total points for students who violate any portion of class policies. The instructor reserves the right to deduct points from the overall/total points for students who fail to answer questions on reading assignments. Up to 50% of the overall/total points may be deducted for violations but any percentage of points may be deducted from attendance points or term paper points for violations. There may or may not be prior warning about losing points.   
   

Make-ups
Make-up exams will only be given if you miss an examination due to official reasons, for
example, a medical emergency, death of an immediate family member, a court order, or representing the university in official university events. Official proof is required. If your excuse does not fall under one of these categories, it is recommended that you produce a copy of a police report or the equivalent to prove the validity of the incident. It will be on a case-by-case basis. Official proof is required.

Course Overview

This serves as a general outline of the course topics and flow. You should expect some modifications. There will be video screenings of movies that have substantial political content. There may be a guest lecture in the middle of the semester. Another guest lecture may be somewhere around the end of the semester.

Week 1: Chapter 1: Introduction. What is politics? Government and its functions

Week 2: Ideologies: Democracy, Communism, Socialism, and Libertarianism.  Where are we in the continuum?

Week 3:            Chapter 11: The Legislature: The different legislative systems of the world.
                          Comparison with the American system.

Week 4:            Chapter 12: The Executive: The different executive systems of the world.
                          Comparison with the American system.

Week 5: Political Culture

Week 6: Guest Lecture

Week 7: Chapter 2: The U.S. Constitution.

Week 8: The U.S. Constitution as compared to the Texas Constitution. What are the main    differences and similarities.
  Chapter 8: Political Parties in the United States.

Week 9: Political Parties in the United States (cont’d). Parties in Texas

Week 10: Chapters 6, 9, and 10: Public Opinion, Elections, and the Media 

Week11:            Public Opinion, Elections, and the Media (cont’d)

Week 12: Chapter 7: Interest Groups

Week 13: The U.S. Judiciary. How is the American judiciary different from the
British judiciary.

Week 14: Judiciary (cont’d)
  Thanksgiving Break (November 26-28; return December 1).
 


Week 15: Chapter 5: Federalism.
  Overview/Make-ups/ 2 Review
  Last day of classes for all: Friday, December 5, 2014. Last day of class for    this class, Thursday December 4, 2014.

Week 16: Final Examination

 

Details Spring 2013 POLS 5773  201  INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT    O'Donohoe Hall 209
Details Spring 2013 POLS 4773  201  INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT    O'Donohoe Hall 209
Details Spring 2013 POLS 1433  203  AMERICAN GOVERNMENT    O'Donohoe Hall 200
Details Spring 2013 POLS 1433  206  AMERICAN GOVERNMENT    O'Donohoe Hall 200
Details Spring 2013 POLS 1433  270  AMERICAN GOVERNMENT    O'Donohoe Hall 200
Details Fall 2012 Pols 6043  180  Graduate Seminar- Civil Wars    O'Donohoe Hall 209
Details Fall 2012 1333  107  American Government    O'Donohoe Hall 200
Details Fall 2012 1333  170  American Government    O'Donohoe Hall 200
Details Spring 2012 POLS 4933  201  SPECIAL TOPICS: PSYCHOLOGY OF INTERNATIONAL DECISION-MAKING    O'Donohoe Hall 209

MWF 11.00 - 11.50 AM

Details Spring 2012 POLS 3593 and 5593  201  ASIAN POLITICS    O'Donohoe Hall 209

MWF 10.00 - 10.50 AM

Details Spring 2012 POLS 1433  270   AMERICAN GOVERNMENT    O'Donohoe Hall 200

MW 6.00 - 7.20 PM

Details Spring 2012 POLS 1433  206  AMERICAN GOVERNMENT    O'Donohoe Hall 200

TR 2.00 - 3.20 PM

Details Fall 2011 POLS 6043  180  ASIA: CONFLICT, STABILITY, REFORM     
Details Spring 2011 POLS 4773 and 5773  201  INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT    Prothro-Yeager Hall 209

MWF 11.00-11.50 am

Details Spring 2011 POLS 3213  201  RESEARCH METHODS    Prothro-Yeager Hall 209

TR 12.30-1.50 pm

Details Fall 2010 POLS 6043  180  GRADUATE SEMINAR: CIVIL WARS    Prothro-Yeager Hall PY 209

THURSDAY 5.30 PM - 8.20 PM




Education Background

Institution Degree    Graduation Date
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa Ph.D. Aug 15 2008 12:00AM 



Employment Background

Institution Position Start Date / End Date
 Concord Associates, Singapore  Safety and Health Consultant  1992  
 SEACEN Asia Pacific Multinational Research and Training Center  Research and Training Coordinator  1996  
 Georgia Governorís Office  Intern  August 2001  December 2001
 Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwooody, GA  Instructor  Fall 2002  Spring 2003
 University of Alabama  Instructor  January 2007  May 2007
 Midwestern State University  Assistant Professor  September 2007  



Research and Publications

Book Chapters

“Coming to America,” in Writing from Sources: A Guide for ESL Students, George Braine & Claire May, Mayfield Publishing: CA, 1996.

“Causes of Civil War Onset” in Causes of War: An Introduction to Theories behind Warfare and Collective Violence, with Karl DeRouen Jr. Edited by Tor G. Jakobsen, NOVA Publishers.

“The Employment of Islam in Southeast Asian Civil Conflicts” in Unraveling Internal Conflicts. Edited Volume. Rowman and Littlefield Publishers.

Journals/Dissertation

“Islam and the Onset of Civil War, 1946-2004”, the University of Alabama

Works in progress

Various work relating to civil war from conference presentations to be submitted to scholarly journals and as book chapters.

Textbook on Worldwide Civil Wars.