Detailed Information for George Diekhoff

Dr. George M. Diekhoff 
Psychology
 » Chair
 Phone
Voice: (940) 397-4348
Fax: (940) 397-4682
 
 

Psychology
 » Professor
Office Location
O'Donohoe Hall 118 
Phone
Voice: (940) 397-4348
Fax: (940) 397-4682
 
 

Contact Information

george.diekhoff@mwsu.edu

My Websites

George M. Diekhoff

Interests

Dr. Diekhoff earned the Ph.D. in experimental psychology and is interested in applied psychological research and program evaluation, particularly in educational settings.

Course Information

  Semester Course #    Section Course Name Location Days / Times
Details Fall 2014 PSYC2203  101/102  PSYC 2203--HUMAN BEHAVIOR    Prothro-Yeager Hall PY101

PSYCHOLOGY 2203
Human Behavior
Fall 2014
Instructor: G. M. Diekhoff
Office: OD-118
Phone: 940-397-4348
e-mail: george.diekhoff@mwsu.edu
Text: King, L. A. (2014). The science of psychology: An appreciate view. New York:
McGraw-Hill. (ISBN-13: 978-0-07-803540-1)
My website URL: http://faculty.mwsu.edu/psychology/george.diekhoff/index.asp
TOPICS READING ASSIGNMENTS
Historical Introduction to Psychology Chapter 1
Biological Foundations of Psychology Chapter 3
Information Processing: Sensation, Perception, Chapters 4 and 7
and Memory
Industrial/Organizational Psychology Chapter 14
Human Motivation and Emotion Chapter 10
Creativity Chapter 7 (pp. 240-253)
Social Psychology Chapter 13
EXAMS
The average of four noncumulative exams will form the primary basis for assigning course grades. Exams will cover both information presented in class and information in the text. You should prepare for exams by studying both your class notes and the textbook because each will contain some unique information.
In order to approximately equalize the amount of material covered on each exam, they will be administered at equally-spaced intervals, with each test examining whatever material was covered since the last test. Testing dates for the M/W section (subject to change) are: Test 1—September 17, Test 2—October 13, Test 3—Novermber 5, Test 4—December 3. Testing dates for the T/R section (subject to change) are: Test 1—September 18, Test 2—October 14, Test 3—Novermber 6, Test 4—December 4.
Makeup exams will be administered on the day/time that we are schedule for final exams: for the M/W section: Dec. 8, 10:30; for the T/R section: Dec. 11, 10:30. There is no grade penalty for tests missed for excused reasons. For tests missed for unexcused reasons, the test grade will be lowered by one letter grade. (See the next section for a definition of excused and unexcused absences.)
ATTENDANCE POLICY
While I realize that you have paid to enroll in this course, I do not subscribe to the view that that gives you free rein to attend class or not as you wish. Rather, I believe that much of what you will learn in college has little to do with the content of your classes and much to do with how you learn to conduct yourself in the adult world. I want to contribute to that secondary learning process. Reliability, conscientiousness, promptness, respect, and courtesy are all highly valued
virtues beyond the walls of academia, considerably more so than your knowledge of the principles of psychology. Therefore, I encourage behaviors that reflect these characteristics in my classes. Your attending class regularly and on time is important to me. Here, then, are the attendance rules:
1. Students are allowed 4 unexcused absences (as defined below) in this class. Each additional unexcused absence beyond these 4 will result in a lowering of the course grade by one-half letter grade.
2. Students who miss the calling of the roll at the beginning of the class will be counted as absent for that day unless you alert me to your presence at the end of the class period to let me know you were only tardy. Each tardy counts as one-half an unexcused absence.
3. If you must leave class early, notify me in advance that that is the case. Your early departure will count as a tardy, just as delayed arrival would count as a tardy.
4. If you are unable to alert me in advance to your early departure, you must meet with me before or following the next class period to explain yourself.
5. Come to class prepared to stay for the duration. Take care of your primary drives prior to arrival. Wandering in and out of class is a distraction that we don’t need. Come to class prepared to stay for the duration and do not leave the classroom for restroom breaks, telephone calls, and the like prior to dismissal.
Absences are excused only under the following circumstances:
1. the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating that the student was unable to attend class on the day(s) of the absence;
2. the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating that the student’s dependent child was ill on the day(s) of the absence;
3. the student provides a written excuse from an official of Midwestern State University stating that the student was in attendance at a mandatory university function on the day(s) of the absence.
In order for an absence to be excused, the written excuse must be provided within one week of the absence. If this is not possible, the student must at least contact me with an explanation within one week of the absence.
Funerals, employment-related absences, illnesses not requiring medical attention, job interviews, family emergencies, automobile malfunctions, court appearances, etc. do not constitute excused absences. Please reserve your 4 allowed unexcused absences to cover these situations.
RESEARCH REQUIREMENT
It is important that students of scientific psychology learn firsthand something about the scientific nature of the discipline. Therefore, all students in PSYC 1103 and 2203 are required to participate in one of the following research-related exercises. No extra credit is given for research participation, but failure to complete the research requirement will result in a one letter grade reduction for the course. The deadline for completing the research requirement is December 5, 2013.
1. Participate in one or more psychology research projects totaling at least 90 minutes. Research opportunities will be announced throughout the semester in postings that appear at http://mwsu.edu/academics/libarts/psychology/research-options
OR
2. Complete a research ethics essay. Participating students will read an article provided by me about research ethics. Following this, students will complete a 3 or 4 page double-spaced, typed summary and review of the information
they read. Tables, figures, pictures do not count toward the minimum page requirement. Essays must be submitted no later than December 5, 2013.
GRADING
Each exam will be scored on a percentage-correct scale as follows:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = 59% and lower
Course grades will be based on the average of grades earned on the four exams using the same grading scale shown above.
Unexcused absences/tardies in excess of those allowed will lower the course grade.
Failure to complete the research participation requirement will lower the course grade.
I will alert you to the possibility of gaining bonus points should those opportunities arise. However, I am not currently aware of any bonus point opportunities for the fall semester.
CELL PHONE
Turn them off.
CHEATING
Don’t do it. It’s not worth what will happen to you.
DISABILITIES
Individuals requiring special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act should contact the Midwestern State University Office of Counseling and Disabilities Services.

ATTENDANCE POLICY
I have read and understand the attendance and plagiarism policies for PSYC 2203. I understand that it is my responsibility to keep track of my absences and tardies. I understand that I will not receive any “warning” that I have reached or exceeded the maximum number of allowed unexcused absences.
____________________________________________ ___________________
Signature Date
____________________________________________
Print Your Name Here
RELEASE TO POST GRADES
Students’ grades and attendance information are posted as a convenience to students. Some student, though, do not want to have this information posted. With my signature below I grant permission to Dr. Diekhoff to post my grades and attendance information by the last 4 digits of my MSU Campus Wide ID Number during the fall 2013 semester. I understand that my grades and attendance information will not be posted unless I sign this form.
___________________________________________ _______________
Signature Date
___________________________________________
Print Your Name Here

Details Fall 2014 3314  101/102/103  PSYC 3314 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS    Prothro-Yeager Hall PY101

PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS
Psychology 3314
Dr. G. M. Diekhoff Fall, 2014
O’Donohoe 118, 397-4348, george.diekhoff@mwsu.edu
Faculty URL: http://faculty.mwsu.edu/psychology/george.diekhoff/index.asp
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
In this course you will be exposed to the full range of basic statistics as they are used by administrators and researchers in the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences. The course begins with descriptive statistics--methods by which we can best describe individual cases, samples of several cases, and even populations. Univariate significant difference tests come next, where you will learn how to determine if a difference that is observed between a sample and a population or between several samples is a difference that is large enough to be attributed to factors beyond the natural variability that is characteristic of samples. Bivariate correlational statistics help us to determine which variables covary, or “move” together, and give us ways of measuring the strength and reliability of those associations. Finally, bivariate regression analysis allows us to use an established correlation between two variables to predict a case’s score on one variable when provided with a score on the other variable. Throughout the semester the emphasis will be on applications of statistical procedures. However, this is not a “cookbook” statistics course. You will learn how statistical analyses work in addition to learning how to use them. Thirteen 50-minute computer labs will provide you with training in the use of the Statistical Package for the Social and Behavioral Sciences (SPSS). This collection of statistical software will enable you to perform a full range of basic statistical analyses.
REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS
Diekhoff, G. M. Basic Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Zip Publishing reprint. Available in campus bookstore and the College Store. Diekhoff, G. M. SPSS for the Social and Behavioral Sciences (2013-2014). Zip Publishing reprint. Available in campus bookstore. Salkind, N. & Green, S. (2011). SPSS QuickStarts. Pearson Publishing. Available in campus bookstore and online. Battery-operated hand calculator with the following functions: +, -, x, /, x2, sq. root, and memory. Travel Drive
TOPICS
READING ASSIGNMENTS
Introduction and summation notation
Chapter 1, Appendix A
Data distributions: tables and graphs
Chapter 2
Descriptive statistics
Chapter 3 EXAM ONE
Standard scores, the normal distribution, and the standard normal distribution
Chapter 4
Sampling distributions and interval estimation
Chapter 5 EXAM TWO
Significant difference tests: One- and two-sample tests; one-way ANOVA; factorial ANOVA
Chapters 6, 7, 8, 9 EXAM THREE
Correlation and regression
Chapters 10, 11 EXAM FOUR (FINAL EXAM) Tuesday, May 8, 2014 8:00-9:20 am
ATTENDANCE POLICY
Lectures:
Students are allowed four unexcused absences (as defined below) in PSYC 3314 lectures during the fall 2014 semester. Each additional unexcused absence beyond these will result in the reduction of your course grade by 20 points (half a letter grade). Each tardy is counted as one-half absence, but if you are tardy you must alert me to your presence at the end of the class period. Leaving class prior to dismissal is considered equivalent to a tardy.
Students who miss one or more lecture exams because of absences will be allowed to take makeup exams, but there will be a one letter grade penalty for exams that were missed for unexcused reasons.
Absences are excused only under the following circumstances: the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating that the student was unable to attend class on the day(s) of the absence; the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating that the student=s dependent child was ill on the day(s) of the absence; the student provides a written excuse from an official of Midwestern State University stating that the student was in attendance at a mandatory university function on the day(s) of the absence.
Funerals, employment-related absences, illnesses not requiring medical attention, job interviews, family emergencies, automobile malfunctions, court appearances, etc. do not constitute excused absences. Please reserve your allowed unexcused absences to cover these situations.
Computer Labs:
Thirteen computer lab sessions (ten instructional labs and three testing sessions) are a required component of this course. Your performance in lab will contribute 25% toward your course grade as described below in the section on “Grading.”
Lab policies and procedures are described separately later in this syllabus.
GRADING
There will be four tests in the lecture portion of the class, each worth 100 points. There will be three tests in the computer lab, each worth 100 points. Finally, there will be 10 computer lab homework assignments each worth 10 points. Course grades will be based on your accumulated point totals, weighted so that the lecture portion of the course contributes 75% to your total and the lab contributes 25%. Finally, unexcused absences in excess of the four that are allowed will lower the total. Your accumulated point total will be calculated as follows:
Total = .75 x (Lecture Test Total) + .25 x (Lab Test Total + Lab Homework Total) - (20 x # of absences beyond 4)
Course letter grades will be assigned on the following scale:
Point Total Letter
360-400 A
320-359 B
280-319 C
240-279 D
239 or less F
Each unexcused absence beyond the four that are allowed will result in a 20 point (one-half letter grade) reduction of your weighted course average. Remember that each tardy counts as one-half absence. Grades on lecture exams taken late because of an unexcused absence will be lowered by one letter grade. Grades on computer lab exams taken late because of an unexcused absence will be lowered by one letter grade. Homework turned in late for any reason other than an excused absence will receive no credit.
DISABILITIES
Individuals requiring special accommodations according to the Americans with Disabilities Act please present the instructor with a special Accommodation Request Form from the MSU Disability Support Services center.
ADDITIONAL EXPECTATIONS
1. Learning requires activity on your part. Learning about statistics will be facilitated by taking notes, thinking of examples, paraphrasing ideas that you hear in class, and so on. Please stay busy and mentally involved in class.
2. Students at Midwestern are increasingly prone to getting up and leaving classes, sometimes returning and sometimes not. That behavior is inappropriate and disruptive. I would not dream of walking out on you during one of your presentations; please offer me the same courtesy. Come to class on time having already taken care of your primary drives and social obligations and be prepared to stay for the duration of the class.
3. Unless you expect to receive an emergency call or text, please turn off cell phones in class. Do not use cell phones in class. If you bring a laptop, use it only for taking notes.
PSYC 3314(101/102/103)—PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS
COMPUTER LAB SCHEDULE
FALL, 2014
(All statistics labs meet in O’Donohoe 126)
MONDAY LABS (Sections 101 and 103)
DATE ACTIVITY
8/25/14 NO LAB
9/1/14 NO LAB (Labor Day)
9/8/14 LAB 1: Getting Started with SPSS for Windows—Creating Data Files
9/15/14 LAB 2: Editing and Modifying Data Files
9/22/14 LAB 3: Generating Reports and Graphs
9/29/14 LAB TEST 1 (Individual Exercises for Labs 1-3 are due.)
10/6/14 LAB 4: Data Distributions and Descriptive Statistics
10/13/14 LAB 5: One-Sample Significant Difference Tests
10/20/14 LAB 6: Two-Sample Significant Difference Tests
10/27/14 LAB TEST 2 (Individual Exercises for Labs 4-6 are due.)
11/3/14 LAB 7: One-Way ANOVA and Related Statistics
11/10/14 LAB 8: Two-Way Completely Randomized Factorial ANOVA
11/17/14 LAB 9: Bivariate Correlation and Scatterplots
11/24/14 LAB 10: Bivariate Regression
12/1/14 LAB TEST 3 (Individual Exercises for Labs 7-10 are due.)
WEDNESDAY LABS (Section 102)
DATE ACTIVITY
8/27/14 NO LAB
9/3/14 LAB 1: Getting Started with SPSS for Windows—Creating Data Files
9/10/14 LAB 2: Editing and Modifying Data Files
9/17/14 LAB 3: Generating Reports and Graphs
9/24/14 LAB TEST 1 (Individual Exercises for Labs 1-3 are due.)
10/1/14 LAB 4: Data Distributions and Descriptive Statistics
10/8/14 LAB 5: One-Sample Significant Difference Tests
10/15/14 LAB 6: Two-Sample Significant Difference Tests
10/22/14 LAB TEST 2 (Individual Exercises for Labs 4-6 are due.)
10/29/14 LAB 7: One-Way ANOVA and Related Statistics
11/5/14 LAB 8: Two-Way Completely Randomized Factorial ANOVA
11/12/14 LAB 9: Bivariate Correlation and Scatterplots
11/19/14 LAB 10: Bivariate Regression
11/26/14 NO LAB (Thanksgiving)
10/3/14 LAB TEST 3 (Individual Exercises for Labs 7-10 are due.)
Computer Lab Policies and Procedures
Attendance in computer labs is optional except on days of computer lab exams. (See schedule of lab activities above.) If you think that you can learn the material on your own, complete and turn in the homework assignments on time, and pass the lab exams, you do not need to attend labs.
Students who miss one or more lab exams because of absences will be allowed to take makeup exams, but there will be a one letter grade penalty for exams that were missed for unexcused reasons. (See syllabus page 2 under “Attendance” for an explanation of what constitutes an excused absence.) SEE YOUR COMPUTER LAB INSTRUCTOR TO ARRANGE MAKE-UP EXAMS. Under no circumstances will you be allowed to complete late exams after the course final exam on May 8 at 8:00 am.
NO HOMEWORK WILL BE ACCEPTED AFTER THE DUE DATES WITHOUT AN EXCUSED ABSENCE. Lab homework assignments are due at the time of the lab exam that covers the material included in those homework assignments. Thus, Labs 1-3 are due when you sit to take Lab Exam 1; Labs 4-6 are due when you sit to take Lab Exam 2; Labs 7-10 are due when you sit to take Lab Exam 3. Lab homework that is late for excused reasons will be accepted, but must be turned in no later than Thursday, May 1, 5:00 pm. Lab homework that is late for unexcused reasons will not be accepted and a grade of 0 will be assigned.
DO NOT COME LATE TO A COMPUTER LAB. Once the lab begins, the door is locked. No one will be admitted to the lab after it has started.
ATTENDANCE POLICY
I have read and understand the policies and procedures for PSYC 3314. I understand that it is my responsibility to keep track of my absences and tardies. I understand that I will not receive any warnings that I have reached or exceeded the maximum number of allowed unexcused absences.
______________________________________________ ________________________
Signature Date
______________________________________________
Print Your Name Here
RELEASE TO POST GRADES
Student grades are posted as a convenience to students. Some students, though, do not wish to have their grades posted. With my signature below I grant permission to post my grades and attendance records by the last 4 digits of my student ID number. I understand that my information will not be posted unless I sign this form. (DO NOT SIGN THIS FORM IF YOU DON’T WANT YOUR INFORMATION POSTED.)
______________________________________________ ________________________
Signature Date
______________________________________________
Print Your Name Here

Details Fall 2013 3314  101/102  Psychological Statistics    Prothro-Yeager Hall PY-101
Details Fall 2013 2203  101  Human Behavior    Prothro-Yeager Hall PY-101
Details Spring 2013 PSYC 4133  201  Perception and Cognition    Prothro-Yeager Hall PY-101
Details Spring 2013 PSYC 3314  201/202/203/204  Psychological Statistics    Prothro-Yeager Hall PY-101
Details Spring 2013 2203  102  Human Behavior    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101
Details Fall 2012 PSYC 5113  101  Research and Statistical Analysis    O'Donohoe Hall OD-110
Details Fall 2012 PSYC 3314  103/104  Psychological Statistics    Prothro-Yeager Hall PY-101
Details Fall 2012 PSYC 3314  101/102  Psychological Statistics    Prothro-Yeager Hall PY-101
Details Summer II 2012 PSYC 4113  401  Industrial/Organizational Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101
Details Summer II 2012 PSYC 3314  401/402  Psychological Statistics    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101
Details Spring 2012 4123  201  History and Systems of Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

MWF 10:00-10:50

Details Spring 2012 3314  202  Psychological Statistics    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

MWF 8:00-8:50

Details Spring 2012 3314  201  Psychological Statistics    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

TR 8:00-9:20

Details Fall 2011 PSYC 5113  101  Research and Statistical Analysis    O'Donohoe Hall OD-110

MW 10-11:20

Details Fall 2011 PSYC 3314  101, 102, 103, 104  Psychological Statistics    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

Sections 101 and 102:  TR 8-9:20

Sections 103 and 104:  TR 11-12:20

Details Spring 2011 4133  201  Perception and Cognition    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

MWF 9:00-9:50

Details Spring 2011 3313  202  Psychological Statistics    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

TR 11:00-12:20

Details Spring 2011 3313  201  Psychological Statistics    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

 TR 8:00-9:20

Details Fall 2010 5113  101  Research and Statistical Analysis    O'Donohoe Hall 110

MW 9:00-10:20 am




Education Background

Institution Degree    Graduation Date
Nebraska Wesleyan University BA  
Texas Christian University MA and Ph.D.  



Employment Background

Institution Position Start Date / End Date
 Midwestern State University  Professor and Chair, Dept. of Psychology  1977-09-01  



Research and Publications

Since 1975 I have authored or coauthored 44 conference papers and posters, published 76 journal articles, manuals, technical reports, and books, and directed 26 masters theses.

The following ten publications are representative of my work. 

Diekhoff, G. M. (1976). Effects of feedback in a forced-choice GSR detection task. Psychophysiology, 13, 22-26.

Diekhoff, G. M., Brown, P. J., and Dansereau, D. F. (1982). Development and assessment of a prose learning strategy training program based on network and depth-of-processing models. Journal of Experimental Education, 50, 180-184.

Diekhoff, G. M. (1982). Cognitive maps as a way of presenting the dimensions of comparison within the history of psychology. Teaching of Psychology, 9, 115-116.

Diekhoff, G. M. (1983). Relationship judgments in the evaluation of structural understanding. Journal of Educational Psychology, 75, 227-233.

Haines, V., Diekhoff, G. M., LaBeff, E. E., and Clark, R. E. (1986). College cheating: Immaturity, lack of commitment, and the neutralizing attitude. Research in Higher Education, 25, 342-354.

Diekhoff, G. M. (1988). An appraisal of adult literacy programs: Reading between the lines. Journal of Reading, 31, 624-630.

Diekhoff, G. M. (1992). Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences: Univariate, Bivariate, and Multivariate. Dubuque, Iowa: Wm. C. Brown Publishers.

Diekhoff, G. M. (1996). Basic Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Diekhoff, G. M., LaBeff, E. E., Clark, R. E.,  Williams, L. E., Francis, B., and Haines, V. J. (1996). College cheating: Ten years later. Research in Higher Education, 37, 487-502.

Diekhoff, G. M., Thompson, S., and Denney, R. (2006). A multidimensional scaling analysis of church climate. Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 25, 17-27.