Detailed Information for Paul Guthrie

Dr. Paul C. Guthrie 
Psychology
 » Associate Professor
Office Location
O'Donohoe Hall 113 
Phone
Voice: (940) 397-4178
Fax: (940) 397-4682
 
 

Contact Information

paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

My Websites

Interests

Personality theory, personality assessment, individual psychotherapy, personality disorders, projective testing, psychopathology


Course Information

  Semester Course #    Section Course Name Location Days / Times
Details Fall 2013 PSYC 5153  101  Theories of Personality    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102

Syllabus

PSYC 5153, Theories of Personality

Fall, 2013

 

Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.

O-113

Phone:  397-4178

 

Text:   Ewen, R. B. (2010). An introduction to theories of personality (7th ed.). New York, NY: Psychology Press

 

Course Description:  This is a discussion course. It is expected that you will have read the assigned materials before coming to class, and that you will be prepared to discuss the readings in a thoughtful manner.

 

Grades:  Grades will be based on four short-essay exams, one 10-15 page paper, and class preparation/participation. The paper, which must be in strict APA style, should consist of an in-depth description of one personality theory or theorist, a discussion of the applied value of the theory, and a review of the empirical literature pertaining to that theory. The papers are due on 11/20 and late papers will not be accepted.

 

                        Exams (18% each)                             72%

                        Paper                                                   18%

                        Class participation                             10%

 

Attendance Policy:  Graduate students are expected to make every effort to attend all classes. Failure to do so reflects on your commitment and professionalism, and will be taken into account in your evaluations.

 

Make-up Policy:  Missed exams may be made up without penalty if the absence is excused, and if you call in before the exam is given. Failure to call in advance will result in a penalty of 10 points (1 letter grade). You should be prepared to take the make-up exam the day you return to class.

 

 

Tentative Lecture, Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Week 1

8/26    Introduction to the class

 

8/28    Introduction to Theories of Personality. 

 Ewen, Chapter 1

             Millon, Chapter 1

 

Weeks 2 & 3

9/4, 9/9 & 9/11  Freud

            Ewen, Chapter 2

            Freud: The Origin and Development of Psychoanalysis

 

 

Week 4

9/16  Jung

            Ewen, Chapter 3

            Jung: Psyche & Symbol, pps. 1 – 60

 

9/18     Adler

            Ewen, Chapter 4

            Adler: The Practice and Theory of Individual Psychology (pp. 1 – 50)

 

Week 5

9/23     Exam I

 

9/25  Horney

            Ewen, Chapter 5

            Horney: Neurosis and Human Growth, pp. 13 – 110

 

Week 6

9/30  Fromm

            Ewen, Chapter 6

            Fromm: Escape From Freedom (pp. 3 – 23 & 136 - 206)

 

10/2  Sullivan

            Ewen, Chapter 7

            The Interpersonal Theory of Psychiatry, pp. 3 – 45

           

Week 7

10/7  Leary

            Interpersonal Diagnosis: Some Problems of Methodology and Validation

            Wiggins: Circumplex Models of Interpersonal Behavior in Clinical Psychology

 

10/9   Erikson

            Ewen, Chapter 8

            Millon, Chapter 15

 

Week 8

10/14  Object Relations Theory

            Cashdan, Chapters 1 – 3

            Millon,  Chapters 19 & 20

 

10/16  Exam II

Week 9

10/21  Allport

            Ewen, Chapter 12

            Allport: The Person in Psychology – Selected Essays  (Chapters 3, 7, 8 & 11)

 

10/23  Cattell & Eysenck

            Ewen, Chapter 13

            Cattell: The structure of personality in its environment (Chapters 1 & 3)

            Eysenck:  The structure of human personality (Chapters 1-3)

 

Week 10

10/28  5-Factor Model

            Digman handout

            American Psychologist, Vol. 48, No. 1, pp. 26-34.

 

10/30   Kelly

            Ewen, Chapter 15

            Clinical psychology and personality; the selected papers of George Kelly             (Chapters 1 – 3)

 

Week 11 

11/4  Exam II

 

 

11/6  Rogers

            Ewen, Chapter 9

            A Way of Being (or The Carl Rogers Reader) (Chapters 6 - 8)

 

 

Week 12

11/11  Maslow

            Ewen, Chapter 10

            Self-Actualization: The Meta-Motivational Theory

 

11/13  May

            Ewen, Chapter 11

            Millon, Chapter 28

 

Week 13

11/18  Skinner

            Ewen, Chapter 14

            Skinner: Critique of Psychoanalytic Concepts and Theories

 

 

 

 

11/20   Bandura

            Ewen, Chapter 16

            Social foundations of thought and action: a social cognitive theory (chapters 7 &                         9)

 

Week 14

            No class – Thanksgiving Holiday

 

Week 15

12/2  Millon

            Millon, Personality Development : Origins, Sequences, and Outcomes

           

 

12/4  Wrap-up

 

Exam IV:  Scheduled during finals:  Wednesday, 12/11: 3:30 – 5:30.

 

Details Fall 2013 PSYC 4903  101  Internship in Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102

Syllabus

PSYC 4903

Psychology Internship

Fall, 2013

 

Coordinator:  Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.                                     Office:  O-113

Office Hours:  TBA                                                                Phone:  397-4178

Class Times:  TBA                                                                 Location:  PY 102

Email: paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

 

Text:  Baird, B. (2011). The internship, practicum, and field placement handbook: A guide for the helping professions (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

 

Course Description: The undergraduate psychology internship at MSU is an advanced elective available to psychology majors who have demonstrated academic achievement and a desire to explore the application of psychological principles in a “real-world” setting. This course is designed to provide you with supervised experience in a setting in which psychology is either practiced or psychological principles and knowledge are applied. The internship experience, along with your required readings, is the basis for monthly class discussions (seminar).

 

Course Objectives

 

1.     To provide paraprofessional level hands-on field experience in a community organization.

2.     To gain “on-the-job” training experiences which will help successful trainees obtain employment in the human services area.

3.     To use the ability to perceive and define human service needs and to generate tentative solutions for solving these issues by reading, observation and direct involvement.

4.     To use and fine-tune self-assessment abilities of specific skills through site supervision, seminar group discussion, presentations and journal writing.

 

Course Prerequisities:

 

1.     Psychology Major

2.     Junior or Senior level.

3.     GPA of 3.0 or higher

4.     Be of good character and committed to helping people.

 

Course Requirements:

 

1.     ON-SITE PLACEMENT – Minimum requirements are 100 hours over at least 10 weeks. Schedules and internship duties will be negotiated between you and your on-site supervisor, with input from the coordinator as needed. For ethical and practical reasons, you should not expect to provide professional services, but client contact, at a paraprofessional level, is an expected part of the internship experience.

 

2.     INTERNSHIP SEMINAR – Seminar will meet monthly for one and a half hours. Interns are expected to attend all meetings; attendance is one component of your grade. Short multiple-choice quizzes will be administered over the required readings at each seminar meeting; in addition, each intern will be expected to report on their internship activities. These meetings are scheduled for 1:00 p.m. on the last Friday of each month. Seminar dates will be on 8/30 (Chapters 1 – 3), 9/27 (Chapters 4 – 6), 10/25 (Chapters 7-9), and 12/6 (Chapters 10-11) for the Fall, 2013 semester.

 

3.     LOG – For your time on-the-job, you will keep a daily log of activities. The log form will document your hours on the job, describe your activities very briefly and will be signed by your site supervisor to verify your accounting.

 

4.     SITE EVALUATION BY SUPERVISOR – You will receive a rating and a letter grade for your performance at the internship site at the end of the semester.

 

Grades:

 

Your grade will be based on

 

1.     Your evaluation by your on-site supervisor (60%)

2.     Quiz grades (10%)

3.     The quality of your log (15%)

4.     Attendance (15%)

Details Fall 2013 PSYC 1103  104  General Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102

Syllabus

General Psychology

PSYC 1103, Section 104

Fall, 2013

 

Professor:  Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.                                                    

Office:  O-113

Office Hours:  9:00 – 11:00 MWF; 9:30 – 11:00 TR; 1:30 – 2:30 M-R

Phone:  397-4178

email: paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

Class Times:  8:00 – 9:20, TR                                                          

Location:  PY 102

 

Text:  King, L.A. (2011). The science of psychology: An appreciative view (2nd ed.).             New York, NY: McGraw-Hill

 

Texas Core Objectives (Competency Based)

 

1.     Critical Thinking Skills—including creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.

2.     Communication Skills—including effective development, interpretation, and expression of ideas through written communication.

3.     Empirical and Quantitative Skills—including the analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions.

4.     Social Responsibility—including intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities.

 

Course Requirements:

 

·       By Exam II, students will have developed a list of at least six favorite psychologists or psychological theories or psychological principles, their “Panel of Experts,” and will be able to describe the unique contribution of each member of the Panel.

 

You will be asked to list and briefly describe the unique contributions of each member of your Panel of Experts ON THE THIRD COURSE EXAM.  That portion of the exam will contribute 25% toward your grade on that exam.

 

·       Your final exam will include an essay component that requires you to address an issue of social, interpersonal, or personal concern (e.g., an unproductive employee, a student who can’t control his spending, religious intolerance) from the perspective of one of the members of your imaginary “Panel of Experts.” This portion of the exam will contribute 25% toward your grade on the final exam.

 

·       Research Requirement: Given the importance of research and research ethics in the field of psychology, all students are required to participate in two research related activities during the semester. Failure to complete two research exercises will result in a one letter grade reduction for the course.

 

·       Options for fulfilling the research requirement for PSYC 1103 may be found at: http://www.mwsu.edu/academics/libarts/psychology/index

            You will be given more information about research options later in the semester.

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Section I

 

Chapters 1 & 2:  8/27 – 9/5

 

Quiz 1: 9/5

 

Chapter 5:  9/10 – 9/17

 

Quiz 2: 9/17

 

Chapter 6 : 9/19 – 9/26

 

Exam I (Chapters 1, 2, 5 & 6) :  10/1

 

Section II

 

Chapter 9 :  10/3 – 10/10

 

Quiz 3 :  10/10

 

Chapter 11 :  10/15 – 10/22

 

Quiz 4 :  10/22

 

Chapter 12:  10/24 – 10/31

 

Exam II (Chapters 9, 11 & 12):  11/7

 

Note:  Due to my absence from class on 11/7, the lecture on Chapter 15 will begin on 11/5, and the Exam for Section II will be delayed until 11/7.

 

Section III

 

Chapter 15: 11/5 – 11/14

 

Quiz 5:  11/4

 

Chapter 16:  11/19 – 11/26

 

Quiz 6:  11/26

 

Chapter 17:  12/3 – 12/5

 

Final Exam (Chapters 15, 16, & 17): Thursday, 12/12 at 8:00 – 10:00

 

Course Requirements:  Grades will be based on your performance on 5 quizzes, worth 30 points each, and 3 exams, worth 100 points each. All exams consist of multiple choice questions, on Scantrons (Form 815-E for quizzes and Form 881-E for exams). The quizzes cover one to two chapters each, while the exams are comprehensive for that section. Test content will be drawn from readings in the text and from lecture material. Not all lecture material will be found in the text, so regular class attendance is required. Course grades are based on the number of points accumulated over the semester. There is a total of 450 possible points, so the grade ranges are as follows:

 

            A = 405 - 450 points

            B = 360 - 404

            C = 315 - 359

            D = 270 - 314

            F = less than 270 points

 

Attendance Policy:  Students are allowed three (3) absences. Once you exceed this limit, whether the absences are excused or not, you may be dropped from the course with a grade of “F”. I will not be responsible for recording attendance for students who are tardy.

 

Ten (10) points extra credit may be obtained by maintaining perfect attendance, defined as having no unexcused absences. Absences are excused only under the following circumstances:

 

            1.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student was unable to attend class on the day(s) of the absence;

            2.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student’s dependent child was ill on the day(s) of the absence;

            3.         the student provides a written excuse from an official of Midwestern State

                        University stating that the student was in attendance at a mandatory

                        university function on the day(s) of the absence.

 

In order for an absence to be excused, the written excuse must be provided within one week of the absence.

 

Funerals, employment-related absences, illnesses not requiring medical attention, job interviews, family emergencies, automobile problems, court appearances, etc. do not constitute excused absences.

 

Make-up Policy:  You may make up one (1) missed exam: if you miss more than one exam, you should drop the course. A mass make-up for exams will be administered on Thursday, 12/12, following the final exam. No other make-ups will be allowed; if you miss an exam during this semester, you must attend this session. Failure to do so will result in a grade of “0” on the missed exam.

 

Cheating Policy:  Any evidence of cheating on exams will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F”. To avoid questions of cheating, make sure you mark your Scantrons cleanly, and use a No. 2 pencil. No grade changes will be made because of “Scantron error.”

 

Note:  Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Also note: Pagers and cell phones are to be turned off during class. If you have a situation that requires you to receive calls, you need to contact me ahead of time, have your device on vibration mode, and take the call outside the classroom.

 

Details Fall 2013 PSYC 1103  106  General Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102

Syllabus

General Psychology

PSYC 1103, Section 106

Fall, 2013

 

Professor:  Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.                                                    

Office:  O-113

Office Hours:  9:00 – 11:00 MWF; 9:30 – 11:00 TR; 1:30 – 2:30 M-R

Phone:  397-4178

email: paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

Class Times:  11:00 – 12:20, TR                                                      

Location:  PY 102

 

Text:  King, L.A. (2011). The science of psychology: An appreciative view (2nd ed.).             New York, NY: McGraw-Hill

 

Texas Core Objectives (Competency Based)

 

1.     Critical Thinking Skills—including creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.

2.     Communication Skills—including effective development, interpretation, and expression of ideas through written communication.

3.     Empirical and Quantitative Skills—including the analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions.

4.     Social Responsibility—including intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities.

 

Course Requirements:

 

·       By Exam II, students will have developed a list of at least six favorite psychologists or psychological theories or psychological principles, their “Panel of Experts,” and will be able to describe the unique contribution of each member of the Panel.

 

You will be asked to list and briefly describe the unique contributions of each member of your Panel of Experts ON THE THIRD COURSE EXAM.  That portion of the exam will contribute 25% toward your grade on that exam.

 

·       Your final exam will include an essay component that requires you to address an issue of social, interpersonal, or personal concern (e.g., an unproductive employee, a student who can’t control his spending, religious intolerance) from the perspective of one of the members of your imaginary “Panel of Experts.” This portion of the exam will contribute 25% toward your grade on the final exam.

 

·       Research Requirement: Given the importance of research and research ethics in the field of psychology, all students are required to participate in two research related activities during the semester. Failure to complete two research exercises will result in a one letter grade reduction for the course.

 

·       Options for fulfilling the research requirement for PSYC 1103 may be found at: http://www.mwsu.edu/academics/libarts/psychology/index

            You will be given more information about research options later in the semester.

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Section I

 

Chapters 1 & 2:  8/27 – 9/5

 

Quiz 1: 9/5

 

Chapter 5:  9/10 – 9/17

 

Quiz 2: 9/17

 

Chapter 6 : 9/19 – 9/26

 

Exam I (Chapters 1, 2, 5 & 6) :  10/1

 

Section II

 

Chapter 9 :  10/3 – 10/10

 

Quiz 3 :  10/10

 

Chapter 11 :  10/15 – 10/22

 

Quiz 4 :  10/22

 

Chapter 12:  10/24 – 10/31

 

Exam II (Chapters 9, 11 & 12):  11/7

 

Note:  Due to my absence from class on 11/7, the lecture on Chapter 15 will begin on 11/5, and the Exam for Section II will be delayed until 11/7.

 

Section III

 

Chapter 15: 11/5 – 11/14

 

Quiz 5:  11/4

 

Chapter 16:  11/19 – 11/26

 

Quiz 6:  11/26

 

Chapter 17:  12/3 – 12/5

 

Final Exam (Chapters 15, 16, & 17): Tuesday, 12/10 at 1:00 – 3:00.

 

Course Requirements:  Grades will be based on your performance on 5 quizzes, worth 30 points each, and 3 exams, worth 100 points each. All exams consist of multiple choice questions, on Scantrons (Form 815-E for quizzes and Form 881-E for exams). The quizzes cover one to two chapters each, while the exams are comprehensive for that section. Test content will be drawn from readings in the text and from lecture material. Not all lecture material will be found in the text, so regular class attendance is required. Course grades are based on the number of points accumulated over the semester. There is a total of 450 possible points, so the grade ranges are as follows:

 

            A = 405 - 450 points

            B = 360 - 404

            C = 315 - 359

            D = 270 - 314

            F = less than 270 points

 

Attendance Policy:  Students are allowed three (3) absences. Once you exceed this limit, whether the absences are excused or not, you may be dropped from the course with a grade of “F”. I will not be responsible for recording attendance for students who are tardy.

 

Ten (10) points extra credit may be obtained by maintaining perfect attendance, defined as having no unexcused absences. Absences are excused only under the following circumstances:

 

            1.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student was unable to attend class on the day(s) of the absence;

            2.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student’s dependent child was ill on the day(s) of the absence;

            3.         the student provides a written excuse from an official of Midwestern State

                        University stating that the student was in attendance at a mandatory

                        university function on the day(s) of the absence.

 

In order for an absence to be excused, the written excuse must be provided within one week of the absence.

 

Funerals, employment-related absences, illnesses not requiring medical attention, job interviews, family emergencies, automobile problems, court appearances, etc. do not constitute excused absences.

 

Make-up Policy:  You may make up one (1) missed exam: if you miss more than one exam, you should drop the course. A mass make-up for exams will be administered on Tuesday, 12/10, following the final exam. No other make-ups will be allowed; if you miss an exam during this semester, you must attend this session. Failure to do so will result in a grade of “0” on the missed exam.

 

Cheating Policy:  Any evidence of cheating on exams will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F”. To avoid questions of cheating, make sure you mark your Scantrons cleanly, and use a No. 2 pencil. No grade changes will be made because of “Scantron error.”

 

Note:  Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Also note: Pagers and cell phones are to be turned off during class. If you have a situation that requires you to receive calls, you need to contact me ahead of time, have your device on vibration mode, and take the call outside the classroom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Details Fall 2013 1103  107  General Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

Syllabus

General Psychology

PSYC 1103, Section 107

Fall, 2013

 

Professor:  Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.                                                    

Office:  O-113

Office Hours:  9:00 – 11:00 MWF; 9:30 – 11:00 TR; 1:30 – 2:30 M-R

Phone:  397-4178

email: paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

Class Times:  3:30 – 4:50, TR                                                          

Location:  PY 101

 

Text:  King, L.A. (2011). The science of psychology: An appreciative view (2nd ed.).             New York, NY: McGraw-Hill

 

Texas Core Objectives (Competency Based)

 

1.     Critical Thinking Skills—including creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.

2.     Communication Skills—including effective development, interpretation, and expression of ideas through written communication.

3.     Empirical and Quantitative Skills—including the analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions.

4.     Social Responsibility—including intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities.

 

Course Requirements:

 

·       By Exam II, students will have developed a list of at least six favorite psychologists or psychological theories or psychological principles, their “Panel of Experts,” and will be able to describe the unique contribution of each member of the Panel.

 

You will be asked to list and briefly describe the unique contributions of each member of your Panel of Experts ON THE THIRD COURSE EXAM.  That portion of the exam will contribute 25% toward your grade on that exam.

 

·       Your final exam will include an essay component that requires you to address an issue of social, interpersonal, or personal concern (e.g., an unproductive employee, a student who can’t control his spending, religious intolerance) from the perspective of one of the members of your imaginary “Panel of Experts.” This portion of the exam will contribute 25% toward your grade on the final exam.

 

·       Research Requirement: Given the importance of research and research ethics in the field of psychology, all students are required to participate in two research related activities during the semester. Failure to complete two research exercises will result in a one letter grade reduction for the course.

 

·       Options for fulfilling the research requirement for PSYC 1103 may be found at: http://www.mwsu.edu/academics/libarts/psychology/index

            You will be given more information about research options later in the semester.

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Section I

 

Chapters 1 & 2:  8/27 – 9/5

 

Quiz 1: 9/5

 

Chapter 5:  9/10 – 9/17

 

Quiz 2: 9/17

 

Chapter 6 : 9/19 – 9/26

 

Exam I (Chapters 1, 2, 5 & 6) :  10/1

 

Section II

 

Chapter 9 :  10/3 – 10/10

 

Quiz 3 :  10/10

 

Chapter 11 :  10/15 – 10/22

 

Quiz 4 :  10/22

 

Chapter 12:  10/24 – 10/31

 

Exam II (Chapters 9, 11 & 12):  11/7

 

Note:  Due to my absence from class on 11/7, the lecture on Chapter 15 will begin on 11/5, and the Exam for Section II will be delayed until 11/7.

 

Section III

 

Chapter 15: 11/5 – 11/14

 

Quiz 5:  11/4

 

Chapter 16:  11/19 – 11/26

 

Quiz 6:  11/26

 

Chapter 17:  12/3 – 12/5

 

Final Exam (Chapters 15, 16, & 17): Tuesday, 12/10 at 1:00 – 3:00.

 

Course Requirements:  Grades will be based on your performance on 5 quizzes, worth 30 points each, and 3 exams, worth 100 points each. All exams consist of multiple choice questions, on Scantrons (Form 815-E for quizzes and Form 881-E for exams). The quizzes cover one to two chapters each, while the exams are comprehensive for that section. Test content will be drawn from readings in the text and from lecture material. Not all lecture material will be found in the text, so regular class attendance is required. Course grades are based on the number of points accumulated over the semester. There is a total of 450 possible points, so the grade ranges are as follows:

 

            A = 405 - 450 points

            B = 360 - 404

            C = 315 - 359

            D = 270 - 314

            F = less than 270 points

 

Attendance Policy:  Students are allowed three (3) absences. Once you exceed this limit, whether the absences are excused or not, you may be dropped from the course with a grade of “F”. I will not be responsible for recording attendance for students who are tardy.

 

Ten (10) points extra credit may be obtained by maintaining perfect attendance, defined as having no unexcused absences. Absences are excused only under the following circumstances:

 

            1.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student was unable to attend class on the day(s) of the absence;

            2.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student’s dependent child was ill on the day(s) of the absence;

            3.         the student provides a written excuse from an official of Midwestern State

                        University stating that the student was in attendance at a mandatory

                        university function on the day(s) of the absence.

 

In order for an absence to be excused, the written excuse must be provided within one week of the absence.

 

Funerals, employment-related absences, illnesses not requiring medical attention, job interviews, family emergencies, automobile problems, court appearances, etc. do not constitute excused absences.

 

Make-up Policy:  You may make up one (1) missed exam: if you miss more than one exam, you should drop the course. A mass make-up for exams will be administered on Tuesday, 12/10, following the final exam. No other make-ups will be allowed; if you miss an exam during this semester, you must attend this session. Failure to do so will result in a grade of “0” on the missed exam.

 

Cheating Policy:  Any evidence of cheating on exams will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F”. To avoid questions of cheating, make sure you mark your Scantrons cleanly, and use a No. 2 pencil. No grade changes will be made because of “Scantron error.”

 

Note:  Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Also note: Pagers and cell phones are to be turned off during class. If you have a situation that requires you to receive calls, you need to contact me ahead of time, have your device on vibration mode, and take the call outside the classroom.

 

Details Fall 2012 PSYC 6173  101  Practicum III    O'Donohoe Hall 110

 

Syllabus

Practicum I, II, III

PSYC 6153, 6163, 6173

Fall, 2012

 

Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.

O-113, 397-4178

paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

Class times: 12:30 – 2:00, TR

Location: OD-110

 

Texts (required):

 

Yalom, I.D. (2009). The gift of therapy: An open letter to a new generationi of therapists and       their patients. New York: Harper Perennial.

            (ISBN-10: 0061719617 | ISBN-13: 978-0061719615)

 

 

McWilliams, N. (2011). Psychoanalytic diagnosis: Understanding personality structure in the        clinical process (2nd ed.). New York: The Guildford Press.

            (ISBN-10: 1609184947 | ISBN-13: 978-1609184940)

 

Course Description: The practicum courses represent the applied component of your clinical training at MSU. It is in this setting that you begin to apply the training you have previously received to working with clients. Each of the practica consists of 150 clock hours of work, at least 50 of which involve direct contact. The remaining hours consist of a variety of indirect hours, which are defined below. The practicum experience also involves group and individual supervision; this course constitutes the group portion. We will be meeting twice a week to discuss the ongoing clinical experiences of the practicum students, for discussions of readings and for clinical symposia.

 

 

Program wide goals of the MACCP

Goal 1:  Acquire a broad knowledge base in clinical and counseling psychology as it applies to theory, assessment, and intervention.

Goal 2:  Demonstrate ethical and multicultural competence in the applications of clinical and counseling psychology to assessment and diagnosis, intervention, and research ethics.

Goal 3:  Communicate in a professional manner in the written and oral formats.

Goal 4:  Be aware of and adhere to the practitioner-scholar model of clinical and counseling psychology, including use of the scientific literature to inform clinical practice.


 

Goals of the Clinical Practica

GOAL 1: Competence in professional conduct, ethics and legal matters

OBJECTIVE 1.1:  Professional interpersonal behavior: Professional and appropriate interactions with colleagues in the practicum setting such as, treatment teams, peers, and supervisors; seeks peer support as needed.

OBJECTIVE 1.2: Seeks consultation and supervision: Seeks consultation or supervision as needed and uses it productively. 

OBJECTIVE 1.3: Uses positive coping strategies. Demonstrates positive coping strategies with personal and professional stressors and challenges.  Maintains professional functioning and quality client care.

OBJECTIVE 1.4: Professional responsibility and documentation. Responsible for key client care tasks (e.g. phone calls, letters, case management), completes tasks promptly.  All client contacts, including scheduled and unscheduled appointments, and phone contacts are well documented. Records include crucial information.

OBJECTIVE 1.5: Efficiency and time management. Efficient and effective time management.  Keeps scheduled appointments and meetings on time.  Keeps supervisors aware of whereabouts as needed.  Minimizes unplanned leave, whenever possible.

GOAL 2: Competence in individual and cultural diversity

OBJECTIVE 2.1:  Client rapport. Consistently achieves a good rapport with clients.

OBJECTIVE 2.2:  Sensitivity to client diversity. Sensitive to the cultural and individual diversity of clients.  Committed to providing culturally sensitive services.

OBJECTIVE 2.3:  Awareness of own cultural and ethnic background.  Aware of own background and its impact on clients.  Committed to continuing to explore own cultural identity issues and relationship to clinical work. 

GOAL 3: Competence in theories and methods of effective psychotherapeutic intervention

OBJECTIVE 3.1:  Client risk management and confidentiality. Effectively evaluates, manages and documents client risk by assessing immediate concerns such as suicidality, homicidality, and any other safety issues.  Collaborates with clients in crisis to make appropriate short-term safety plans, and intensify treatment as needed.  Discusses all applicable confidentiality issues openly with clients.

OBJECTIVE 3.2: Diagnostic skill. Demonstrates a thorough working knowledge of psychiatric diagnostic nomenclature and DSM multiaxial classification.  Utilizes historical, interview, and psychometric data to diagnose accurately.

OBJECTIVE 3.3: Case conceptualization and treatment goals.  Formulates a useful case conceptualization that draws on theoretical and research knowledge.  If applicable, collaborates with client to form appropriate treatment goals.

OBJECTIVE 3.4: Therapeutic interventions.  Interventions are well-timed, effective and consistent with empirically supported treatments.

OBJECTIVE 3.5: Group therapy skills and preparation. Intervenes in group skillfully, attends to member participation, completion of therapeutic assignments, group communication, safety and confidentiality.  If the group is psychoeducational, readies materials for group, and understands each session’s goals and tasks.

GOAL 4: Competence in scholarly inquiry and application of current scientific knowledge to practice

OBJECTIVE 4.1: Seeks current scientific knowledge. Displays necessary self-direction in gathering clinical and research information practice independently and competently. Seeks out current scientific knowledge as needed to enhance knowledge about clinical practice and other relevant areas.

GOAL 5: Competence in psychological assessment and report writing

Note: This goal may not be applicable to all practicum placements. 

Objective 5.1:  Psychological Test Selection and Administration. Promptly and proficiently administers commonly used tests in his/her area of practice.  If applicable, appropriately chooses the tests to be administered.  Demonstrates competence in administering intelligence and personality tests.

Objective 5.2:  Psychological Test Interpretation. Interprets the results of psychological tests used in his/her area of practice.  Demonstrates competence interpreting cognitive and personality tests. 

Objective 5.3: Assessment Writing Skills. Writes a well-organized psychological report.  Answers the referral question clearly and provides the referral source with specific recommendations.

Objective 5.4: Feedback Regarding Assessment.  Plans and carries out a feedback interview.   Explains the test results in terms the client and/or caregiver can understand, provides suitable recommendations and responds to issues raised by client or caregiver.

 

Prerequisites

 

1. In the semester prior to enrolling in Practicum I (PSYC 6153), students are expected to attend the weekly group supervision/practicum class.  Students are not required to complete graded assignments or enroll in the course. 

 

2.  Prior to any client contact (approximately 6 weeks prior to the end of the pre-practicum semester), students must apply for and purchase Professional Liability Insurance from American Professional Agency, INC. You can apply for and pay for the insurance online at https://www2.americanprofessional.com/cgibin/STUNEWAD  Please choose 1 million/3 million as the insurance limits. The cost is for the insurance is $35. Please email a copy of your insurance certificate to the Director of Clinical Training.  Students will need to renew their insurance annually as long as they are providing clinical services as a student. 

 

3. Students must also complete a criminal background check prior to seeing clients.  The form can be downloaded on the important forms page of the graduate program website (http://libarts.mwsu.edu/psychology/ma/Form_index.asp ).  The completed form should be submitted to the department secretary by mid-term of the pre-practicum semester.

 

Course Requirements

 

  1. Students will provide 10-15 hours of practicum related services throughout the entire semester. Students will obtain a minimum of 150 service hours over the course of the semester.  Ideally students will amass additional hours.
    1. Direct contact hours: Students will obtain a minimum 50 hours of direct client contact.  Direct contact hours include:
      1. Individual, couple, family, or group psychological services
      2. Psychological assessment involving client contact
      3. Professional consultation and educational workshops that are clinical in nature
    2. Indirect professional service hours: Students will obtain a minimum 100 hours of indirect professional service hours. Professional service hours include:
      1. Individual and group supervision
      2. Scoring and report writing for psychological assessment
      3. Office duties
      4. Shadowing fellow clinician
    3. Tracking Hours: Hours should be logged in the practicum hours tracking spreadsheet found on the important forms page of the graduate program website.  This first page (showing cumulative hours) should be printed, signed by the individual supervisor and practicum course instructor, and submitted to the director of clinical training at the semester midterm and at the end of the semester. 

 

Students are not allowed to terminate service provision upon completion of hours prior to end of the semester. Some students request that they begin working prior to the first day of class or work over break and between semesters. These hours count towards an ‘Incomplete’ from the previous semester or towards the next practicum. In some external practicum sites, such as Red River, First Step, or the State Hospital, the programs come to depend on the services provided by practicum students.  Please make sure your supervisor is notified at the beginning of your placement of any time that you will take off between semesters.  Students at these sites may want to limit their time off between semesters to one week.

 

  1. Evaluation of practicum students:  Individual supervisors will evaluate the student at semester midterm and at the end of the semester. Students are responsible for providing the supervisor with the Practicum Student Evaluation Form, which can be found on the important forms page of the graduate program website.  These forms should be submitted to the director of clinical training. Students will receive an incomplete for the course if these evaluations are not submitted by the end of the semester. 

 

  1. Chart Review:  Periodically throughout the semester, the director of clinical training will review a random selection of client charts.  Please see the clinic manual for a copy of the chart review checklist and a list of items that should be included in clinic charts. Each clinician is responsible for making sure that client notes are up to date and signed by the individual supervisor.  If appropriate, treatment plans and transfer/termination summaries must be completed and filed. At the end of the semester, students will receive an incomplete if their client charts are not complete.

 

  1. Treatment Plans: By the 3rd session with every client, clinicians will submit a treatment plan outlining goals for treatment and planned interventions.  The clinician will discuss the treatment plan with the client and involve the client in establishing treatment goals.  The treatment plan will be included in the client’s clinic chart.

 

  1. Termination and Transfer Summaries:  At the end of treatment, the clinician will summarize the client’s presentation and progress.  This document will be used to facilitate an immediate transfer or follow-up services sought at a later date.

 

  1. Group Supervision: All students will come to group supervision prepared to discuss their cases.  Attendance is mandatory and absences must be cleared with the instructor or a reduction in grade may occur. 

 

Scheduled Case Presentations: The 1st 45-minutes of Tuesday practicum (12:30-1:15) will be for scheduled student case presentations.

 

1. The clinician is responsible for providing a one page outline summarizing services to date. All identifying information should be altered or removed for the protection of the client. The presentation should include:

  1. background information: demographics, brief history (only what’s relevant to conceptualization)
  2. case conceptualization: problem list, competencies/resources, primary/orienting issue or dx, theoretical conceptualization (using theory to understand why  these problems at this time for this client)
  3. treatment goal & plan
  4. question or concern
  5. video or audio recording cued to relevant section

 

2. Participants are responsible for:

  1. asking questions that clarify missing information and deepen the understanding of the client.
  2. providing ethical and theoretically based interpretations and recommendations.

 

Unscheduled presentations/questions: The 2nd 45-minutes of Tuesday practicum (1:15-2:00) will be dedicated to case presentations that are determined by questions or problems in therapy that student clinicians choose to bring to the group.  Every clinician should be prepared to discuss at least one client.  If you see clients in the clinic, bring a tape queued to a time in the session you would like to discuss.

 

Didactics: Thursday practicum shall comprise didactics and discussion of assigned reading. Students are expected to offer insights, aid in answering comments by other students,  discuss professional development generally as well as at an individual level.

 

  1. Individual Supervision: Each student clinician will meet at least one hour weekly individually with a supervisor. Individual supervision will often include videotaped presentations of the therapeutic encounter. Attendance is mandatory and absences must be cleared with the instructor or a reduction in grade will occur. Clinic students need to bring:
    1. Cued videotape
    2. Client files with notes completed for sessions since the last supervision meeting

 

External students will engage in the supervisory process that is in place at the external placement. Students completing practicum in an external setting will meet with one of the clinical faculty for individual supervision of any cases carried in the Psychology Clinic. Students will be expected to follow of the policies in the clinic manual while providing services in the clinic.

 

  1. Case conceptualization Paper: (100 points each) Every student shall prepare an extensive case conceptualization paper on one client (single spaced). The report shall contain the following areas:
    1. Presenting problem/history of the problem
    2. Relevant history
      1. Family, social, and relational history
      2. Educational/work history
      3. Medical/Psychological history, including substance abuse
    3. Testing information (if available)
    4. Theoretical conceptualization of the client(s):  references (3-5) are appropriate here
      1. problem list and how problems are related to one another
      2. competencies/resources
      3.  primary/orienting issue or diagnosis
      4.  theoretical conceptualization (using theory to understand why  these problems at this time for this client)
    5. Summary of the report (1/2-1 page)
    6. Diagnosis across the 5 axes
    7. Treatment goals and strategies (references may be appropriate here).

 

Rewrites: An initial grade will be given. Should a paper need a re-write, the student will be given the option of (a) accept the current grade or (b) re-write the paper. Should a second re-write be needed, the student may (a) accept the current grade or (b) re-re-write the paper. The third draft will receive a letter grade – 1 grade level, etc.  

 

Attendance Policy:  Graduate students are expected to make every effort to attend all classes.

Failure to do so reflects on your commitment and professionalism, and will be taken into account

in your evaluations.

 

Note: Cell phones are to be turned off during class. If you have a situation that requires you to receive calls, you need to contact me ahead of time, have your device on vibration mode, and take the call outside the classroom.

 

Details Fall 2012 PSYC 6163  101  Practicum II    O'Donohoe Hall 110

 

Syllabus

Practicum I, II, III

PSYC 6153, 6163, 6173

Fall, 2012

 

Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.

O-113, 397-4178

paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

Class times: 12:30 – 2:00, TR

Location: OD-110

 

Texts (required):

 

Yalom, I.D. (2009). The gift of therapy: An open letter to a new generationi of therapists and       their patients. New York: Harper Perennial.

            (ISBN-10: 0061719617 | ISBN-13: 978-0061719615)

 

 

McWilliams, N. (2011). Psychoanalytic diagnosis: Understanding personality structure in the        clinical process (2nd ed.). New York: The Guildford Press.

            (ISBN-10: 1609184947 | ISBN-13: 978-1609184940)

 

Course Description: The practicum courses represent the applied component of your clinical training at MSU. It is in this setting that you begin to apply the training you have previously received to working with clients. Each of the practica consists of 150 clock hours of work, at least 50 of which involve direct contact. The remaining hours consist of a variety of indirect hours, which are defined below. The practicum experience also involves group and individual supervision; this course constitutes the group portion. We will be meeting twice a week to discuss the ongoing clinical experiences of the practicum students, for discussions of readings and for clinical symposia.

 

 

Program wide goals of the MACCP

Goal 1:  Acquire a broad knowledge base in clinical and counseling psychology as it applies to theory, assessment, and intervention.

Goal 2:  Demonstrate ethical and multicultural competence in the applications of clinical and counseling psychology to assessment and diagnosis, intervention, and research ethics.

Goal 3:  Communicate in a professional manner in the written and oral formats.

Goal 4:  Be aware of and adhere to the practitioner-scholar model of clinical and counseling psychology, including use of the scientific literature to inform clinical practice.


 

Goals of the Clinical Practica

GOAL 1: Competence in professional conduct, ethics and legal matters

OBJECTIVE 1.1:  Professional interpersonal behavior: Professional and appropriate interactions with colleagues in the practicum setting such as, treatment teams, peers, and supervisors; seeks peer support as needed.

OBJECTIVE 1.2: Seeks consultation and supervision: Seeks consultation or supervision as needed and uses it productively. 

OBJECTIVE 1.3: Uses positive coping strategies. Demonstrates positive coping strategies with personal and professional stressors and challenges.  Maintains professional functioning and quality client care.

OBJECTIVE 1.4: Professional responsibility and documentation. Responsible for key client care tasks (e.g. phone calls, letters, case management), completes tasks promptly.  All client contacts, including scheduled and unscheduled appointments, and phone contacts are well documented. Records include crucial information.

OBJECTIVE 1.5: Efficiency and time management. Efficient and effective time management.  Keeps scheduled appointments and meetings on time.  Keeps supervisors aware of whereabouts as needed.  Minimizes unplanned leave, whenever possible.

GOAL 2: Competence in individual and cultural diversity

OBJECTIVE 2.1:  Client rapport. Consistently achieves a good rapport with clients.

OBJECTIVE 2.2:  Sensitivity to client diversity. Sensitive to the cultural and individual diversity of clients.  Committed to providing culturally sensitive services.

OBJECTIVE 2.3:  Awareness of own cultural and ethnic background.  Aware of own background and its impact on clients.  Committed to continuing to explore own cultural identity issues and relationship to clinical work. 

GOAL 3: Competence in theories and methods of effective psychotherapeutic intervention

OBJECTIVE 3.1:  Client risk management and confidentiality. Effectively evaluates, manages and documents client risk by assessing immediate concerns such as suicidality, homicidality, and any other safety issues.  Collaborates with clients in crisis to make appropriate short-term safety plans, and intensify treatment as needed.  Discusses all applicable confidentiality issues openly with clients.

OBJECTIVE 3.2: Diagnostic skill. Demonstrates a thorough working knowledge of psychiatric diagnostic nomenclature and DSM multiaxial classification.  Utilizes historical, interview, and psychometric data to diagnose accurately.

OBJECTIVE 3.3: Case conceptualization and treatment goals.  Formulates a useful case conceptualization that draws on theoretical and research knowledge.  If applicable, collaborates with client to form appropriate treatment goals.

OBJECTIVE 3.4: Therapeutic interventions.  Interventions are well-timed, effective and consistent with empirically supported treatments.

OBJECTIVE 3.5: Group therapy skills and preparation. Intervenes in group skillfully, attends to member participation, completion of therapeutic assignments, group communication, safety and confidentiality.  If the group is psychoeducational, readies materials for group, and understands each session’s goals and tasks.

GOAL 4: Competence in scholarly inquiry and application of current scientific knowledge to practice

OBJECTIVE 4.1: Seeks current scientific knowledge. Displays necessary self-direction in gathering clinical and research information practice independently and competently. Seeks out current scientific knowledge as needed to enhance knowledge about clinical practice and other relevant areas.

GOAL 5: Competence in psychological assessment and report writing

Note: This goal may not be applicable to all practicum placements. 

Objective 5.1:  Psychological Test Selection and Administration. Promptly and proficiently administers commonly used tests in his/her area of practice.  If applicable, appropriately chooses the tests to be administered.  Demonstrates competence in administering intelligence and personality tests.

Objective 5.2:  Psychological Test Interpretation. Interprets the results of psychological tests used in his/her area of practice.  Demonstrates competence interpreting cognitive and personality tests. 

Objective 5.3: Assessment Writing Skills. Writes a well-organized psychological report.  Answers the referral question clearly and provides the referral source with specific recommendations.

Objective 5.4: Feedback Regarding Assessment.  Plans and carries out a feedback interview.   Explains the test results in terms the client and/or caregiver can understand, provides suitable recommendations and responds to issues raised by client or caregiver.

 

Prerequisites

 

1. In the semester prior to enrolling in Practicum I (PSYC 6153), students are expected to attend the weekly group supervision/practicum class.  Students are not required to complete graded assignments or enroll in the course. 

 

2.  Prior to any client contact (approximately 6 weeks prior to the end of the pre-practicum semester), students must apply for and purchase Professional Liability Insurance from American Professional Agency, INC. You can apply for and pay for the insurance online at https://www2.americanprofessional.com/cgibin/STUNEWAD  Please choose 1 million/3 million as the insurance limits. The cost is for the insurance is $35. Please email a copy of your insurance certificate to the Director of Clinical Training.  Students will need to renew their insurance annually as long as they are providing clinical services as a student. 

 

3. Students must also complete a criminal background check prior to seeing clients.  The form can be downloaded on the important forms page of the graduate program website (http://libarts.mwsu.edu/psychology/ma/Form_index.asp ).  The completed form should be submitted to the department secretary by mid-term of the pre-practicum semester.

 

Course Requirements

 

  1. Students will provide 10-15 hours of practicum related services throughout the entire semester. Students will obtain a minimum of 150 service hours over the course of the semester.  Ideally students will amass additional hours.
    1. Direct contact hours: Students will obtain a minimum 50 hours of direct client contact.  Direct contact hours include:
      1. Individual, couple, family, or group psychological services
      2. Psychological assessment involving client contact
      3. Professional consultation and educational workshops that are clinical in nature
    2. Indirect professional service hours: Students will obtain a minimum 100 hours of indirect professional service hours. Professional service hours include:
      1. Individual and group supervision
      2. Scoring and report writing for psychological assessment
      3. Office duties
      4. Shadowing fellow clinician
    3. Tracking Hours: Hours should be logged in the practicum hours tracking spreadsheet found on the important forms page of the graduate program website.  This first page (showing cumulative hours) should be printed, signed by the individual supervisor and practicum course instructor, and submitted to the director of clinical training at the semester midterm and at the end of the semester. 

 

Students are not allowed to terminate service provision upon completion of hours prior to end of the semester. Some students request that they begin working prior to the first day of class or work over break and between semesters. These hours count towards an ‘Incomplete’ from the previous semester or towards the next practicum. In some external practicum sites, such as Red River, First Step, or the State Hospital, the programs come to depend on the services provided by practicum students.  Please make sure your supervisor is notified at the beginning of your placement of any time that you will take off between semesters.  Students at these sites may want to limit their time off between semesters to one week.

 

  1. Evaluation of practicum students:  Individual supervisors will evaluate the student at semester midterm and at the end of the semester. Students are responsible for providing the supervisor with the Practicum Student Evaluation Form, which can be found on the important forms page of the graduate program website.  These forms should be submitted to the director of clinical training. Students will receive an incomplete for the course if these evaluations are not submitted by the end of the semester. 

 

  1. Chart Review:  Periodically throughout the semester, the director of clinical training will review a random selection of client charts.  Please see the clinic manual for a copy of the chart review checklist and a list of items that should be included in clinic charts. Each clinician is responsible for making sure that client notes are up to date and signed by the individual supervisor.  If appropriate, treatment plans and transfer/termination summaries must be completed and filed. At the end of the semester, students will receive an incomplete if their client charts are not complete.

 

  1. Treatment Plans: By the 3rd session with every client, clinicians will submit a treatment plan outlining goals for treatment and planned interventions.  The clinician will discuss the treatment plan with the client and involve the client in establishing treatment goals.  The treatment plan will be included in the client’s clinic chart.

 

  1. Termination and Transfer Summaries:  At the end of treatment, the clinician will summarize the client’s presentation and progress.  This document will be used to facilitate an immediate transfer or follow-up services sought at a later date.

 

  1. Group Supervision: All students will come to group supervision prepared to discuss their cases.  Attendance is mandatory and absences must be cleared with the instructor or a reduction in grade may occur. 

 

Scheduled Case Presentations: The 1st 45-minutes of Tuesday practicum (12:30-1:15) will be for scheduled student case presentations.

 

1. The clinician is responsible for providing a one page outline summarizing services to date. All identifying information should be altered or removed for the protection of the client. The presentation should include:

  1. background information: demographics, brief history (only what’s relevant to conceptualization)
  2. case conceptualization: problem list, competencies/resources, primary/orienting issue or dx, theoretical conceptualization (using theory to understand why  these problems at this time for this client)
  3. treatment goal & plan
  4. question or concern
  5. video or audio recording cued to relevant section

 

2. Participants are responsible for:

  1. asking questions that clarify missing information and deepen the understanding of the client.
  2. providing ethical and theoretically based interpretations and recommendations.

 

Unscheduled presentations/questions: The 2nd 45-minutes of Tuesday practicum (1:15-2:00) will be dedicated to case presentations that are determined by questions or problems in therapy that student clinicians choose to bring to the group.  Every clinician should be prepared to discuss at least one client.  If you see clients in the clinic, bring a tape queued to a time in the session you would like to discuss.

 

Didactics: Thursday practicum shall comprise didactics and discussion of assigned reading. Students are expected to offer insights, aid in answering comments by other students,  discuss professional development generally as well as at an individual level.

 

  1. Individual Supervision: Each student clinician will meet at least one hour weekly individually with a supervisor. Individual supervision will often include videotaped presentations of the therapeutic encounter. Attendance is mandatory and absences must be cleared with the instructor or a reduction in grade will occur. Clinic students need to bring:
    1. Cued videotape
    2. Client files with notes completed for sessions since the last supervision meeting

 

External students will engage in the supervisory process that is in place at the external placement. Students completing practicum in an external setting will meet with one of the clinical faculty for individual supervision of any cases carried in the Psychology Clinic. Students will be expected to follow of the policies in the clinic manual while providing services in the clinic.

 

  1. Case conceptualization Paper: (100 points each) Every student shall prepare an extensive case conceptualization paper on one client (single spaced). The report shall contain the following areas:
    1. Presenting problem/history of the problem
    2. Relevant history
      1. Family, social, and relational history
      2. Educational/work history
      3. Medical/Psychological history, including substance abuse
    3. Testing information (if available)
    4. Theoretical conceptualization of the client(s):  references (3-5) are appropriate here
      1. problem list and how problems are related to one another
      2. competencies/resources
      3.  primary/orienting issue or diagnosis
      4.  theoretical conceptualization (using theory to understand why  these problems at this time for this client)
    5. Summary of the report (1/2-1 page)
    6. Diagnosis across the 5 axes
    7. Treatment goals and strategies (references may be appropriate here).

 

Rewrites: An initial grade will be given. Should a paper need a re-write, the student will be given the option of (a) accept the current grade or (b) re-write the paper. Should a second re-write be needed, the student may (a) accept the current grade or (b) re-re-write the paper. The third draft will receive a letter grade – 1 grade level, etc.  

 

Attendance Policy:  Graduate students are expected to make every effort to attend all classes.

Failure to do so reflects on your commitment and professionalism, and will be taken into account

in your evaluations.

 

Note: Cell phones are to be turned off during class. If you have a situation that requires you to receive calls, you need to contact me ahead of time, have your device on vibration mode, and take the call outside the classroom.

 

Details Fall 2012 PSYC 6153  101  Practicum I    O'Donohoe Hall 110

 

Syllabus

Practicum I, II, III

PSYC 6153, 6163, 6173

Spring, 2012

 

Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.

O-113, 397-4178

paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

Class times: 12:30 – 2:00, TR

Location: OD-110

 

Texts (required):

 

Yalom, I.D. (2009). The gift of therapy: An open letter to a new generationi of therapists and       their patients. New York: Harper Perennial.

            (ISBN-10: 0061719617 | ISBN-13: 978-0061719615)

 

 

McWilliams, N. (2011). Psychoanalytic diagnosis: Understanding personality structure in the        clinical process (2nd ed.). New York: The Guildford Press.

            (ISBN-10: 1609184947 | ISBN-13: 978-1609184940)

 

Course Description: The practicum courses represent the applied component of your clinical training at MSU. It is in this setting that you begin to apply the training you have previously received to working with clients. Each of the practica consists of 150 clock hours of work, at least 50 of which involve direct contact. The remaining hours consist of a variety of indirect hours, which are defined below. The practicum experience also involves group and individual supervision; this course constitutes the group portion. We will be meeting twice a week to discuss the ongoing clinical experiences of the practicum students, for discussions of readings and for clinical symposia.

 

 

Program wide goals of the MACCP

Goal 1:  Acquire a broad knowledge base in clinical and counseling psychology as it applies to theory, assessment, and intervention.

Goal 2:  Demonstrate ethical and multicultural competence in the applications of clinical and counseling psychology to assessment and diagnosis, intervention, and research ethics.

Goal 3:  Communicate in a professional manner in the written and oral formats.

Goal 4:  Be aware of and adhere to the practitioner-scholar model of clinical and counseling psychology, including use of the scientific literature to inform clinical practice.


 

Goals of the Clinical Practica

GOAL 1: Competence in professional conduct, ethics and legal matters

OBJECTIVE 1.1:  Professional interpersonal behavior: Professional and appropriate interactions with colleagues in the practicum setting such as, treatment teams, peers, and supervisors; seeks peer support as needed.

OBJECTIVE 1.2: Seeks consultation and supervision: Seeks consultation or supervision as needed and uses it productively. 

OBJECTIVE 1.3: Uses positive coping strategies. Demonstrates positive coping strategies with personal and professional stressors and challenges.  Maintains professional functioning and quality client care.

OBJECTIVE 1.4: Professional responsibility and documentation. Responsible for key client care tasks (e.g. phone calls, letters, case management), completes tasks promptly.  All client contacts, including scheduled and unscheduled appointments, and phone contacts are well documented. Records include crucial information.

OBJECTIVE 1.5: Efficiency and time management. Efficient and effective time management.  Keeps scheduled appointments and meetings on time.  Keeps supervisors aware of whereabouts as needed.  Minimizes unplanned leave, whenever possible.

GOAL 2: Competence in individual and cultural diversity

OBJECTIVE 2.1:  Client rapport. Consistently achieves a good rapport with clients.

OBJECTIVE 2.2:  Sensitivity to client diversity. Sensitive to the cultural and individual diversity of clients.  Committed to providing culturally sensitive services.

OBJECTIVE 2.3:  Awareness of own cultural and ethnic background.  Aware of own background and its impact on clients.  Committed to continuing to explore own cultural identity issues and relationship to clinical work. 

GOAL 3: Competence in theories and methods of effective psychotherapeutic intervention

OBJECTIVE 3.1:  Client risk management and confidentiality. Effectively evaluates, manages and documents client risk by assessing immediate concerns such as suicidality, homicidality, and any other safety issues.  Collaborates with clients in crisis to make appropriate short-term safety plans, and intensify treatment as needed.  Discusses all applicable confidentiality issues openly with clients.

OBJECTIVE 3.2: Diagnostic skill. Demonstrates a thorough working knowledge of psychiatric diagnostic nomenclature and DSM multiaxial classification.  Utilizes historical, interview, and psychometric data to diagnose accurately.

OBJECTIVE 3.3: Case conceptualization and treatment goals.  Formulates a useful case conceptualization that draws on theoretical and research knowledge.  If applicable, collaborates with client to form appropriate treatment goals.

OBJECTIVE 3.4: Therapeutic interventions.  Interventions are well-timed, effective and consistent with empirically supported treatments.

OBJECTIVE 3.5: Group therapy skills and preparation. Intervenes in group skillfully, attends to member participation, completion of therapeutic assignments, group communication, safety and confidentiality.  If the group is psychoeducational, readies materials for group, and understands each session’s goals and tasks.

GOAL 4: Competence in scholarly inquiry and application of current scientific knowledge to practice

OBJECTIVE 4.1: Seeks current scientific knowledge. Displays necessary self-direction in gathering clinical and research information practice independently and competently. Seeks out current scientific knowledge as needed to enhance knowledge about clinical practice and other relevant areas.

GOAL 5: Competence in psychological assessment and report writing

Note: This goal may not be applicable to all practicum placements. 

Objective 5.1:  Psychological Test Selection and Administration. Promptly and proficiently administers commonly used tests in his/her area of practice.  If applicable, appropriately chooses the tests to be administered.  Demonstrates competence in administering intelligence and personality tests.

Objective 5.2:  Psychological Test Interpretation. Interprets the results of psychological tests used in his/her area of practice.  Demonstrates competence interpreting cognitive and personality tests. 

Objective 5.3: Assessment Writing Skills. Writes a well-organized psychological report.  Answers the referral question clearly and provides the referral source with specific recommendations.

Objective 5.4: Feedback Regarding Assessment.  Plans and carries out a feedback interview.   Explains the test results in terms the client and/or caregiver can understand, provides suitable recommendations and responds to issues raised by client or caregiver.

 

Prerequisites

 

1. In the semester prior to enrolling in Practicum I (PSYC 6153), students are expected to attend the weekly group supervision/practicum class.  Students are not required to complete graded assignments or enroll in the course. 

 

2.  Prior to any client contact (approximately 6 weeks prior to the end of the pre-practicum semester), students must apply for and purchase Professional Liability Insurance from American Professional Agency, INC. You can apply for and pay for the insurance online at https://www2.americanprofessional.com/cgibin/STUNEWAD  Please choose 1 million/3 million as the insurance limits. The cost is for the insurance is $35. Please email a copy of your insurance certificate to the Director of Clinical Training.  Students will need to renew their insurance annually as long as they are providing clinical services as a student. 

 

3. Students must also complete a criminal background check prior to seeing clients.  The form can be downloaded on the important forms page of the graduate program website (http://libarts.mwsu.edu/psychology/ma/Form_index.asp ).  The completed form should be submitted to the department secretary by mid-term of the pre-practicum semester.

 

Course Requirements

 

  1. Students will provide 10-15 hours of practicum related services throughout the entire semester. Students will obtain a minimum of 150 service hours over the course of the semester.  Ideally students will amass additional hours.
    1. Direct contact hours: Students will obtain a minimum 50 hours of direct client contact.  Direct contact hours include:
      1. Individual, couple, family, or group psychological services
      2. Psychological assessment involving client contact
      3. Professional consultation and educational workshops that are clinical in nature
    2. Indirect professional service hours: Students will obtain a minimum 100 hours of indirect professional service hours. Professional service hours include:
      1. Individual and group supervision
      2. Scoring and report writing for psychological assessment
      3. Office duties
      4. Shadowing fellow clinician
    3. Tracking Hours: Hours should be logged in the practicum hours tracking spreadsheet found on the important forms page of the graduate program website.  This first page (showing cumulative hours) should be printed, signed by the individual supervisor and practicum course instructor, and submitted to the director of clinical training at the semester midterm and at the end of the semester. 

 

Students are not allowed to terminate service provision upon completion of hours prior to end of the semester. Some students request that they begin working prior to the first day of class or work over break and between semesters. These hours count towards an ‘Incomplete’ from the previous semester or towards the next practicum. In some external practicum sites, such as Red River, First Step, or the State Hospital, the programs come to depend on the services provided by practicum students.  Please make sure your supervisor is notified at the beginning of your placement of any time that you will take off between semesters.  Students at these sites may want to limit their time off between semesters to one week.

 

  1. Evaluation of practicum students:  Individual supervisors will evaluate the student at semester midterm and at the end of the semester. Students are responsible for providing the supervisor with the Practicum Student Evaluation Form, which can be found on the important forms page of the graduate program website.  These forms should be submitted to the director of clinical training. Students will receive an incomplete for the course if these evaluations are not submitted by the end of the semester. 

 

  1. Chart Review:  Periodically throughout the semester, the director of clinical training will review a random selection of client charts.  Please see the clinic manual for a copy of the chart review checklist and a list of items that should be included in clinic charts. Each clinician is responsible for making sure that client notes are up to date and signed by the individual supervisor.  If appropriate, treatment plans and transfer/termination summaries must be completed and filed. At the end of the semester, students will receive an incomplete if their client charts are not complete.

 

  1. Treatment Plans: By the 3rd session with every client, clinicians will submit a treatment plan outlining goals for treatment and planned interventions.  The clinician will discuss the treatment plan with the client and involve the client in establishing treatment goals.  The treatment plan will be included in the client’s clinic chart.

 

  1. Termination and Transfer Summaries:  At the end of treatment, the clinician will summarize the client’s presentation and progress.  This document will be used to facilitate an immediate transfer or follow-up services sought at a later date.

 

  1. Group Supervision: All students will come to group supervision prepared to discuss their cases.  Attendance is mandatory and absences must be cleared with the instructor or a reduction in grade may occur. 

 

Scheduled Case Presentations: The 1st 45-minutes of Tuesday practicum (12:30-1:15) will be for scheduled student case presentations.

 

1. The clinician is responsible for providing a one page outline summarizing services to date. All identifying information should be altered or removed for the protection of the client. The presentation should include:

  1. background information: demographics, brief history (only what’s relevant to conceptualization)
  2. case conceptualization: problem list, competencies/resources, primary/orienting issue or dx, theoretical conceptualization (using theory to understand why  these problems at this time for this client)
  3. treatment goal & plan
  4. question or concern
  5. video or audio recording cued to relevant section

 

2. Participants are responsible for:

  1. asking questions that clarify missing information and deepen the understanding of the client.
  2. providing ethical and theoretically based interpretations and recommendations.

 

Unscheduled presentations/questions: The 2nd 45-minutes of Tuesday practicum (1:15-2:00) will be dedicated to case presentations that are determined by questions or problems in therapy that student clinicians choose to bring to the group.  Every clinician should be prepared to discuss at least one client.  If you see clients in the clinic, bring a tape queued to a time in the session you would like to discuss.

 

Didactics: Thursday practicum shall comprise didactics and discussion of assigned reading. Students are expected to offer insights, aid in answering comments by other students,  discuss professional development generally as well as at an individual level.

 

  1. Individual Supervision: Each student clinician will meet at least one hour weekly individually with a supervisor. Individual supervision will often include videotaped presentations of the therapeutic encounter. Attendance is mandatory and absences must be cleared with the instructor or a reduction in grade will occur. Clinic students need to bring:
    1. Cued videotape
    2. Client files with notes completed for sessions since the last supervision meeting

 

External students will engage in the supervisory process that is in place at the external placement. Students completing practicum in an external setting will meet with one of the clinical faculty for individual supervision of any cases carried in the Psychology Clinic. Students will be expected to follow of the policies in the clinic manual while providing services in the clinic.

 

  1. Case conceptualization Paper: (100 points each) Every student shall prepare an extensive case conceptualization paper on one client (single spaced). The report shall contain the following areas:
    1. Presenting problem/history of the problem
    2. Relevant history
      1. Family, social, and relational history
      2. Educational/work history
      3. Medical/Psychological history, including substance abuse
    3. Testing information (if available)
    4. Theoretical conceptualization of the client(s):  references (3-5) are appropriate here
      1. problem list and how problems are related to one another
      2. competencies/resources
      3.  primary/orienting issue or diagnosis
      4.  theoretical conceptualization (using theory to understand why  these problems at this time for this client)
    5. Summary of the report (1/2-1 page)
    6. Diagnosis across the 5 axes
    7. Treatment goals and strategies (references may be appropriate here).

 

Rewrites: An initial grade will be given. Should a paper need a re-write, the student will be given the option of (a) accept the current grade or (b) re-write the paper. Should a second re-write be needed, the student may (a) accept the current grade or (b) re-re-write the paper. The third draft will receive a letter grade – 1 grade level, etc.  

 

Attendance Policy:  Graduate students are expected to make every effort to attend all classes.

Failure to do so reflects on your commitment and professionalism, and will be taken into account

in your evaluations.

 

Note: Cell phones are to be turned off during class. If you have a situation that requires you to receive calls, you need to contact me ahead of time, have your device on vibration mode, and take the call outside the classroom.

 

Details Fall 2012 PSYC 6143  101  Personality Assessment    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102

 

Syllabus

PSYC 6143

Techniques of Assessment II (Personality Assessment)

Fall, 2012

 

Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.

O-113

Phone:  397-4178

Email:  paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

 

Texts:

 

Required:      

Groth-Marnat, G.  (2009).  Handbook of psychological assessment (5th

                        ed).  Hoboken, NJ:  Wiley.

 

Graham, J. R. (2011).  MMPI-2:  Assessing personality and

                        psychopathology (5th  ed).  New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Course Description:  This course deals with the administration, scoring, interpretation, integration and synthesis of personality assessment approaches and instruments.  We will be covering a variety of techniques and instruments, each of which is widely used in psychological practice.  Mastery of these approaches and instruments is extremely important in your development as a psychologist.

 

This is a mastery course; as such, there are no exams or term papers.  The emphasis will be on your developing at least minimal competence in all content areas.  Minimal competence includes writing skills in addition to scoring, interpretation, etc.  Over the course of this semester, you will be writing seven reports (tentatively).  Some of these will consist of interpretations of single instruments, while others will require integration and synthesis of multiple instruments. You will be required to achieve a grade of at least “OK” on each report; if you fail to achieve an “OK” grade, you will be required to rewrite the report until you do so.  As a result, you will be guaranteed an “A” in the course, assuming you turn in all reports on time.  Late reports will not be accepted.

 

Tentative Reading and Report Schedule

 

Week 1 (8/27, 8/29)  Overview/Introduction to Personality Assessment

            G-M:  Chapters 1 & 2

 

Week 2 (9/3, 9/5) Report Writing

             G-M:  Chapter 15

           

 

 

Week 3 (9/10, 9/12) Clinical Interviews, Behavioral Assessment, Mental Status Exams

            G-M:  Chapters 3 & 4

           

Week 4  (9/17, 9/19)  Introduction to the MMPI-2 

            G-M:  Chapter 7

            Graham, Chapters 1, 2 & 9

 

Week 5 (9/24, 9/26)  Interpretive Strategies

            Graham: Chapters 3, 4 & 5

            Report 1 due 9/26:  Interview, Mental Status Exam

 

Week 6  (10/1, 10/3)  Advanced Interpretation

            Graham: Chapters 6, 7, & 8

 

Week 7  (10/8, 10/10)  Special Groups & Computerized Administration

            Graham: Chapters 10 & 12

 

Week 8  (10/15, 10/17) Interpretive Exercises

            Graham: Chapter 14

            Report 2 due 10/17:  MMPI-2

 

Week 9  (10/22, 10/24)  MMPI-A 

            Graham: Chapter 15

            Report 3 due 10/24:  MMPI-2

 

Week 10  (10/29, 10/31)  Psychodynamic Interpretation of the MMPI

            Trimboli & Kilgore article (on reserve)

            Report 4 due 10/31:  MMPI-A

 

Week 11  (11/5, 11/7) Interpretive Exercises 

            No assigned readings

            Report 5 due 11/7:  MMPI-2 or MMPI-A, psychodynamic interpretation

 

Week 12  (11/12, 11/14) PAI, MCMI-III, NEO-PI-R 

            Readings on reserve

            G-M: Chapter 8

           

Week 13  (11/19)  No class

 

Week 14 (11/26, 11/28) Thematic Apperception Test, Projective Drawings

            G-M:  Chapter 11

            Report 6 due 11/28: PAI

           

           

 

Week 15  (12/3, 12/5)   Interpretive Exercises

            No assigned readings

Report 7 due 12/5 (Integrated):  Full battery - Clinical Interview and MSE, MMPI-2 or MMPI-A and Projectives

 

Final re-writes due by 12:00 p.m, Monday 12/10.

 

Final copies of papers will be available by 12:00 p.m., Friday, 12/14.

 

Please note that this schedule is tentative, and other readings may be assigned.

 

Over this semester, you will be required to test at least one adolescent (ages 13 - 18), but you may test up to three.  Your other subjects should be 18 or older, and should not be friends or family members.  I strongly suggest that each of you develop a pool of subjects which you then share with your peers.  No feedback will be given to your subjects.  Parental permission forms will be required for adolescent subjects.  All reports must be typewritten and double spaced.  Each report will be accompanied by the appropriate profile sheets and a copy of your working notes for interpretation.

 

Attendance Policy: You are expected to attend class; failure to do so will reflect on your commitment and professionalism.  Beyond that, considerable time will be spent on interpretive exercises in class, and this is a crucial component of this course.

Details Fall 2012 PSYC 4903  101  Internship in Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102

 

Syllabus

PSYC 4903

Psychology Internship

Fall, 2012

 

Coordinator:  Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.                                     Office:  O-113

Office Hours:  TBA                                                                Phone:  397-4178

Class Times:  TBA                                                                  Location:  PY 102

Email: paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

 

Text:  Baird, B. (2011). The internship, practicum, and field placement handbook: A guide for the helping professions (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

 

Course Description: The undergraduate psychology internship at MSU is an advanced elective available to psychology majors who have demonstrated academic achievement and a desire to explore the application of psychological principles in a “real-world” setting. This course is designed to provide you with supervised experience in a setting in which psychology is either practiced or psychological principles and knowledge are applied. The internship experience, along with your required readings, is the basis for monthly class discussions (seminar).

 

Course Objectives

 

  1. To provide paraprofessional level hands-on field experience in a community organization.
  2. To gain “on-the-job” training experiences which will help successful trainees obtain employment in the human services area.
  3. To use the ability to perceive and define human service needs and to generate tentative solutions for solving these issues by reading, observation and direct involvement.
  4. To use and fine-tune self-assessment abilities of specific skills through site supervision, seminar group discussion, presentations and journal writing.

 

Course Prerequisities:

 

  1. Psychology Major
  2. Junior or Senior level.
  3. GPA of 3.0 or higher
  4. Be of good character and committed to helping people.

 

Course Requirements:

 

  1. ON-SITE PLACEMENT – Minimum requirements are 100 hours over at least 10 weeks. Schedules and internship duties will be negotiated between you and your on-site supervisor, with input from the coordinator as needed. For ethical and practical reasons, you should not expect to provide professional services, but client contact, at a paraprofessional level, is an expected part of the internship experience.

 

  1. INTERNSHIP SEMINAR – Seminar will meet monthly for one and a half hours. Interns are expected to attend all meetings; attendance is one component of your grade. Short multiple-choice quizzes will be administered over the required readings at each seminar meeting; in addition, each intern will be expected to report on their internship activities. These meetings are scheduled for 1:00 p.m. on the last Friday of each month. Seminar dates will be on 8/31 (Chapters 1 – 3), 9/28 (Chapters 4 – 6), 10/26 (Chapters 7-9), and 11/30 (Chapters 10-11) for the Fall, 2011 semester.

 

  1. LOG – For your time on-the-job, you will keep a daily log of activities. The log form will document your hours on the job, describe your activities very briefly and will be signed by your site supervisor to verify your accounting.

 

  1. SITE EVALUATION BY SUPERVISOR – You will receive a rating and a letter grade for your performance at the internship site at the end of the semester.

 

Grades:

 

Your grade will be based on

 

  1. Your evaluation by your on-site supervisor (60%)
  2. Quiz grades (10%)
  3. The quality of your log (15%)
  4. Attendance (15%)
Details Fall 2012 PSYC 1103  103  General Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101
Details Summer II 2012 PSYC 5153  401  Theories of Personality    O'Donohoe Hall 102

 

Syllabus

PSYC 5153, Theories of Personality

Summer II, 2012

 

Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.

O-113

Phone:  397-4178

E-mail: paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

 

Text:    Ewen, R. B. (2003). An introduction to theories of personality (7th ed.). Mahwah, N.J: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 

Course Description:  While this is usually a lecture course, the realities of the summer session require some revision to the standard format. First, and foremost, you will be required to keep up with the reading assignments, and be prepared to discuss the readings each day in class. You will be provided a template with questions to answer as you read, but this should be viewed as minimal preparation for class. We will make extensive use of case studies to apply the information you have learned.

 

Grades:  Grades will be based on class preparation/participation and one take-home final exam. The final will require you to conceptualize a case-study from a number of theoretical orientations, then compare and contrast the alternative conclusions.

 

                        Exam                                                   50%

                        Class participation                               50%

 

Attendance Policy:  Graduate students are expected to make every effort to attend all classes. Failure to do so reflects on your commitment and professionalism, and will be taken into account in your evaluations.

 

Tentative Lecture, Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Week 1

 

7/5       Introduction to the class

7/6       Introduction to Theories of Personality. 

Ewen, Chapter 1

            Millon, Chapter 1, 1983 text

7/7       Freud

            Ewen, Chapter 2

7/8       Jung

            Ewen, Chapter 3

 

 

 

 

Week 2

 

7/12     Adler

            Ewen, Chapter 4

7/13     No class

7/14     Horney

            Ewen, Chapter 5

7/15     Erikson

            Ewen, Chapter 8

 

Week 3

 

7/19     Fromm,

            Ewen, Chapter 6

7/20     Object Relations Theory

            Cashdan, Chapters 1 & 2

7/21     Allport

            Ewen, Chapter 12

7/22     Cattell, Eysenck, & the 5-Factor Model

            Ewen, Chapter 13

            Goldberg (American Psychologist, 48, 26-34)

 

Week 4

 

7/26     Kelly

            Ewen, Chapter 15

7/27     Rogers

            Ewen, Chapter 9

7/28     Maslow

            Ewen, Chapter 10

7/29     May

            Ewen, Chapter 11

 

Week 5

 

8/2       Skinner

            Ewen, Chapter 14

8/3       Bandura         

            Ewen, Chapter 16

8/4       Millon

            Chapter 3, 1996 text

8/5       Final Exam due

Details Summer II 2012 PSYC 1103  401  General Psychology    O'Donohoe Hall 102

 

Syllabus

General Psychology

PSYC 1103, Section 401

Summer II, 2012

 

Professor:  Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.                                                     

Office:  O-113

Office Hours:  9:00 – 11:00, M-F, 2:00 – 3:00, MW

Phone:  397-4178

email: paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

Class Times:  1:00 – 1:50, MWF                                                        

Location:  PY 102

 

Text:  King, L.A. (2011). The science of psychology: An appreciative view (2nd ed.).          New York, NY: McGraw-Hill

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Section I

 

Chapter 1:  1/18 – 1/30

 

Quiz 1: 1/30

 

Chapter 4:  2/1 – 2/8

 

Quiz 2: 2/8

 

Chapter 5 : 2/10 – 2/17

 

Exam I (Chapters 1, 4 & 5) : 2/20

 

Section II

 

Chapter 9 :  2/22 – 3/2

 

Quiz 3 :  3/2

 

Chapter 10 :  3/5 – 3/23

 

Quiz 4 :  3/23

 

Chapter 11:  3/26 – 4/2

 

Exam II (Chapters 9, 10 & 11):  4/4

 

Section III

 

Chapter 12: 4/9 – 4/16

 

Quiz 5:  4/16

 

Chapter 13:  4/18 – 4/27

 

Quiz 6:  4/27

 

Chapter 14:  4/30 – 5/4

 

Final Exam (Chapters 15, 16, & 17): Monday, 5/7 at  3:30 – 5:30

 

Course Requirements:  Grades will be based on your performance on 5 quizzes, worth 30 points each, and 3 exams, worth 100 points each. All exams consist of multiple choice questions, on Scantrons (Form 815-E for quizzes and Form 881-E for exams). The quizzes cover one chapter each, while the exams are comprehensive for that section. Test content will be drawn from readings in the text and from lecture material. Not all lecture material will be found in the text, so regular class attendance is required. Course grades are based on the number of points accumulated over the semester. There is a total of 450 possible points, so the grade ranges are as follows:

 

            A = 405 - 450 points

            B = 360 - 404

            C = 315 - 359

            D = 270 - 314

            F = less than 270 points

 

 

Attendance Policy:  Students are allowed five (5) absences. Once you exceed this limit, whether the absences are excused or not, you may be dropped from the course with a grade of “F”. I will not be responsible for recording attendance for students who are tardy.

 

Ten (10) points extra credit may be obtained by maintaining perfect attendance, defined as having no unexcused absences. Absences are excused only under the following circumstances:

 

            1.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student was unable to attend class on the day(s) of the absence;

            2.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student’s dependent child was ill on the day(s) of the absence;

            3.         the student provides a written excuse from an official of Midwestern State

                        University stating that the student was in attendance at a mandatory

                        university function on the day(s) of the absence.

 

In order for an absence to be excused, the written excuse must be provided within one week of the absence.

 

Funerals, employment-related absences, illnesses not requiring medical attention, job interviews, family emergencies, automobile problems, court appearances, etc. do not constitute excused absences.

 

Make-up Policy:  Quizzes may not be made up; however, you can drop your lowest quiz grade, which may consist of a missed grade. You may make up one (1) missed exam: if you miss more than one exam, you should drop the course. A mass make-up for exams will be administered on Monday, May 7, following the final exam. No other make-ups will be allowed; if you miss an exam during this semester, you must attend this session. Failure to do so will result in a grade of “0” on the missed exam.

 

Cheating Policy:  Any evidence of cheating on exams will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F”. To avoid questions of cheating, make sure you mark your Scantrons cleanly, and use a No. 2 pencil. No grade changes will be made because of “Scantron error.”

 

Note:  Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Also note: Pagers and cell phones are to be turned off during class. If you have a situation that requires you to receive calls, you need to contact me ahead of time, have your device on vibration mode, and take the call outside the classroom. If you have to leave the classroom, for whatever reason, please take your belongings with you and do not return, to minimize disruptions.

 

Details Spring 2012 PSYC 6113  201  Individual Psychotherapy    Prothro-Yeager Hall 202
Details Spring 2012 PSYC 4303  201  Critical Thinking in Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102
Details Spring 2012 PSYC 4103  201  Clinical Psychology    Dillard College of Business Administration 113
Details Spring 2012 PSYC 1103  104  General Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102
Details Fall 2011 PSYC 5163  101  Psychopathology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102
Details Fall 2011 PSYC 4903  101  Internship in Psychology     
Details Fall 2011 PSYC 4903  101  Internship in Psychology    O'Donohoe Hall 102

 

Syllabus

PSYC 4903

Psychology Internship

Fall, 2011

 

Coordinator:  Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.                                     Office:  O-113

Office Hours:  TBA                                                                Phone:  397-4178

Class Times:  TBA                                                                  Location:  PY 102

Email: paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

 

Text:  Baird, B. (2011). The internship, practicum, and field placement handbook: A guide for the helping professions (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

 

Course Description: The undergraduate psychology internship at MSU is an advanced elective available to psychology majors who have demonstrated academic achievement and a desire to explore the application of psychological principles in a “real-world” setting. This course is designed to provide you with supervised experience in a setting in which psychology is either practiced or psychological principles and knowledge are applied. The internship experience, along with your required readings, is the basis for monthly class discussions (seminar).

 

Course Objectives

 

  1. To provide paraprofessional level hands-on field experience in a community organization.
  2. To gain “on-the-job” training experiences which will help successful trainees obtain employment in the human services area.
  3. To use the ability to perceive and define human service needs and to generate tentative solutions for solving these issues by reading, observation and direct involvement.
  4. To use and fine-tune self-assessment abilities of specific skills through site supervision, seminar group discussion, presentations and journal writing.

 

Course Prerequisities:

 

  1. Psychology Major
  2. Junior or Senior level.
  3. GPA of 3.0 or higher
  4. Be of good character and committed to helping people.

 

Course Requirements:

 

  1. ON-SITE PLACEMENT – Minimum requirements are 100 hours over at least 10 weeks. Schedules and internship duties will be negotiated between you and your on-site supervisor, with input from the coordinator as needed. For ethical and practical reasons, you should not expect to provide professional services, but client contact, at a paraprofessional level, is an expected part of the internship experience.

 

  1. INTERNSHIP SEMINAR – Seminar will meet monthly for one and a half hours. Interns are expected to attend all meetings; attendance is one component of your grade. Short multiple-choice quizzes will be administered over the required readings at each seminar meeting; in addition, each intern will be expected to report on their internship activities. These meetings are scheduled for 1:00 p.m. on the last Friday of each month. Seminar dates will be on 8/26 (Chapters 1 – 3), 9/30 (Chapters 4 – 6), 10/28 (Chapters 7-9), and 12/2 (Chapters 10-11) for the Fall, 2011 semester.

 

  1. LOG – For your time on-the-job, you will keep a daily log of activities. The log form will document your hours on the job, describe your activities very briefly and will be signed by your site supervisor to verify your accounting.

 

  1. SITE EVALUATION BY SUPERVISOR – You will receive a rating and a letter grade for your performance at the internship site at the end of the semester.

 

Grades:

 

Your grade will be based on

 

  1. Your evaluation by your on-site supervisor (60%)
  2. Quiz grades (10%)
  3. The quality of your log (15%)
  4. Attendance (15%)
Details Fall 2011 PSYC 3603  101  Abnormal Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101
Details Fall 2011 PSYC 1103  105  General Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102
Details Summer II 2011 PSYC 5823  401  The Rorschach    O'Donohoe Hall 110

 

Syllabus

PSYC 5823: The Rorschach

Summer II, 2011

 

Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.

OD 113

Phone:  397-4178

paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

 

Texts: (required)

 

Exner, J. E. (2001). A Rorschach workbook for the comprehensive system (5th ed.).

Asheville, NC: Rorschach Workshops.

 

Exner, J. E. (2000). A Primer for Rorschach interpretation. Asheville, NC: Rorschach

            Workshops.

 

Course Description: Upon completion of this course, you should be able to administer, code and interpret the Rorschach, using the Comprehensive System, at a minimal level of competence.

 

This course will require a considerable amount of time outside of class. Before we can begin in earnest, you will have to read chapters 1 - 7 in the Workbook. After this introductory period, you will be required to complete coding exercises on a daily basis. Accurate coding is absolutely essential (though not sufficient) for valid interpretation in the Comprehensive System. You will be required to pass a coding test approximately halfway through the semester. You must pass this test before you will be allowed to complete the course. You may repeat the test until you pass. Toward the end of the semester, you will be required to test a subject and submit a comprehensive report.

 

Grades will be based on your score on the Midterm exam, the report and an objective final exam, which will consist of interpreting a protocol.

 

Tentative Schedule

 

7/5       Introduction

7/6       Chapters 1 & 2 (Workbook)

7/7       Chapters 3 & 4 (Workbook)

7/8       Chapters 5, 6 & 7 (Workbook)

 

7/11     Practice coding – Section 1 (Workbook)

7/12     Practice coding – Section 2

7/13     Practice coding – Section 3

7/14     Practice coding – Section 4

 

7/18     Practice coding – Section 5

7/19     Practice coding – Section 6

7/20     Practice coding – Section 7

7/21     Practice coding – Section 8

 

7/25     Midterm coding exam

7/26     Administration: Chapter 1 (Workbook) (yes, again…it should make more sense to you at this point.) General Guidelines to Interpretation (Chapter 1 – Primer) and Controls and Stress Tolerance (Chapter 2 – Primer).

7/27     Situationally Related Stress (Chapter 3 – Primer)

7/28     Affect (Chapter 4 – Primer).

 

8/1       Information Processing and Cognitive Mediation (Chapters 5 & 6 – Primer)

8/2       Ideation (Chapter 7 – Primer);  Self-perception (Chapter 8 – Primer)

8/3       Interpersonal Perception and Behavior/The Complete Description (Chapters 9 & 10 – Primer)

8/4       Report due; Final Exam

 

Attendance Policy: Failure to attend class will reflect negatively on your commitment and professionalism, as well as significantly affect your ability to utilize the Rorschach competently.

Details Summer II 2011 PSYC 4203  401  Psychology of Personality     PY 102

 

Syllabus

Psychology of Personality

PSYC 4203, Section 401

Summer II, 2011

 

Professor:  Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.                                                      Office:  O-113

Office Hours:  12:15 – 1:00, M-Th                                                     Phone:  397-4178

Class Times:  10:10 – 12:10, M-Th                                                     Location:  PY 102

Email:  paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

 

Text:  Ryckman, R. M. (2008). Theories of Personality (9th ed.). Belmont, CA:                  Thomson Wadsworth.

 

Course Objectives:  This course is intended as a survey of the major theories of personality development and functioning, including an introduction to personality assessment and current research.

 

Course Description:  Material will be presented in the form of class lectures and, hopefully, an occasional video presentation. Class lectures will be related to, but not identical with, material presented in the text, and you will be tested on both. Therefore, regular class attendance is required.

                Grades will be based on five equally weighted exams. Tests will consist of multiple-choice questions.

 

Grades:  Exams                (5 @ 100 points each)  100%

             

            A = 450 - 500 points

            B = 400 - 449

            C = 350 - 399

            D = 300 - 349

            F = less than 300 points

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Unit I              (Chapters 1 - 3)  7/5 – 7/8

 

EXAM I          7/8

 

Unit II             (Chapters 4 - 7)  7/11 – 7/14

 

EXAM II        7/14

 

Unit III                       (Chapters 8 - 10)  7/18 – 7/21

 

EXAM III       7/21

 

Unit IV           (Chapters 11 - 14)  7/25 – 7/28

 

EXAM IV       7/28

 

Unit V             (Chapters 15 - 17)  8/1 – 8/4

 

FINAL EXAM           Thursday, 8/4

 

Attendance Policy:  Students are allowed three (3) absences. Once you exceed this limit, whether the absences are excused or not, you may be dropped from the course with a grade of “F.” I will not be responsible for recording attendance for students who are tardy.

 

Ten (10) points extra credit may be obtained by maintaining perfect attendance, defined as having no unexcused absences. Absences are excused only under the following circumstances:

 

            1.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student was unable to attend class on the day(s) of the absence;

            2.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student’s dependent child was ill on the day(s) of the absence;

            3.         the student provides a written excuse from an official of Midwestern State

                        University stating that the student was in attendance at a mandatory

                        university function on the day(s) of the absence.

 

In order for an absence to be excused, the written excuse must be provided within one week of the absence.

 

Funerals, employment-related absences, illnesses not requiring medical attention, job interviews, family emergencies, automobile problems, court appearances, etc. do not constitute excused absences.

 

Make-up Policy:  A mass make-up exam will be held on Thursday, 8/4, following the Final Exam, for anyone who misses any of the regularly scheduled exams. This is the only make-up, and failure to attend this session will result in a grade of  “0” for all missed exams. This test may be a different format from the regular exams, at the discretion of the professor.

 

Cheating Policy:  Any evidence of cheating on exams, or plagiarism in the preparation of term papers, will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F.” To avoid questions of cheating, make sure you mark your Scantrons cleanly, with a No. 2 pencil. No grade changes will be made because of “Scantron error.”

 

Note:  Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Also note: Pagers and cell phones are to be turned off during class. If you have a situation that requires you to receive calls, you need to contact me ahead of time, have your device on vibration mode, and take the call outside the classroom.

Details Spring 2011 PSYC 6113  201  Individual Psychotherapy    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102

 

Syllabus

PSYC 6113, Individual Psychotherapy

Spring, 2011

 

Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.

O-113, 397-4178

paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

 

Texts: (Required)

 

            Corsini, R. J., & Wedding, D. (Eds.). (2011). Current psychotherapies (9th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole – Thomson.

                       

            Teyber, E. & McClure, F.H. (2011). Interpersonal process in psychotherapy (6th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole – Thomson.

 

            Teyber, E., & McClure, F. H. (2011). Student workbook for interpersonal process in therapy. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole – Thomson.

 

            Young, M. E. (2009). Learning the art of helping: Building blocks and techniques 4th ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ:  Pearson-Merrill.

                       

Course Description: This course will be divided into didactic and applied components, with each being taught concurrently throughout the semester. Tuesday sessions will consist of lectures and class discussion covering the major theories and issues of psychotherapy, while Thursday sessions will be used for the discussion, rehearsal, role-playing, etc. of the basic skills required to engage in psychotherapy. In addition to regular class sessions, students will be required to spend approximately one hour per week in practice sessions. These sessions, which will consist of practicing various therapeutic skills, will be videotaped for later review. Students will also be required to keep a journal, in which each practice session is critiqued and suggestions for improvement are recorded. Tapes and journals will be reviewed by me, with the student present, on a regular basis.

 

Grades will be based on two short-essay exams and demonstrated clinical proficiency. The clinical grade will be on a pass/fail basis, but a passing grade is required to pass the course. Clinical grades will be assigned at the time of video reviews.

 

Attendance Policy: Graduate students are expected to make every effort to attend all classes. Failure to do so reflects on your commitment and professionalism. Attendance of all Thursday classes is especially crucial.

 

Make-up Policy: Missed exams may be made up without penalty if the absence is excused, and if you call in before the exam is given. Failure to call in advance will result in a penalty of 10 points (1 letter grade). You should be prepared to take to make-up exam the day you return to class.

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

1/17  Introduction/Syllabus

1/19  Chapter 1 (Corsini & Wedding [C&W])

 

1/24  Chapter 2 (C&W)

1/26 Chapters 1 & 2 (Young)

 

1/31 Chapter 3 (C&W)

2/2   Chapters 3 & 4 (Young)

 

2/7  Chapter 4 (C&W)

2/9  Chapters 5 & 6 (Young)

 

2/14  Chapter 5 (C&W)

2/16  Chapters 7 & 8 (Young)

 

2/21  Chapter 6 (C&W)

2/23  Chapters 9 & 10  (Young)

 

2/28   Chapter 8 (C&W)

3/1     Chapters 11 & 12  (Young)

 

3/6   Chapters 13, 14 & 15 (Young)

3/8   Exam I (C&W & Young)

 

3/20  Chapter 7 (C&W)

3/22  Chapters 1 & 2 (Teyber &  Workbook)

 

3/27    Chapter 9 (C&W)

3/29    Chapters 3 & 4 (Teyber &  Workbook)

 

4/3  Chapter 10 (C&W)

4/5  No class: Easter Break

 

4/10  Chapter 11 (C&W)

4/12  Chapters 5 & 6 (Teyber &  Workbook)

 

4/17  Chapter 12 (C&W)

4/19  Chapters 7 & 8 (Teyber &  Workbook) 

 

4/24  Chapter 13 (C&W)

4/26  Chapters 9 & 10 (Teyber &  Workbook)

 

 

 

5/1    Chapters 14 & 15 (C&W)

5/3    EXAM II - (C & W and Teyber texts)

 

Final Exam: The final exam in this class will consist of your critique of a videotaped session. You will be required to turn in the video, as well as the critique. Your critique should include a discussion of the techniques you used, the theoretical orientation from which you are working, and the rationale for what you did. After all, the point of this course is that psychotherapy is an intentional, theoretically-based process...it is not making it up as you go.

 

Your videotape and critique must be turned in by 1:00 p.m. on Thursday,  5/10/11.


 

Details Spring 2011 PSYC 4103  201  Clinical Psychology    Dillard College of Business Administration 131

 

Syllabus

Clinical Psychology

PSYC 4103 - 201

Spring, 2011

 

Professor:  Paul C. Guthrie, Ph.D.                              Class Times:  11:00 – 12:20, TR

Office:  O-113                                                            Location:  DB131

Phone:  397-4178                                                        Email: paul.guthrie@mwsu.edu

Office Hours:  9:00 – 11:00, M-F

                        2:00 – 3:00, MW        

 

Text (Required):  

 

Trull, T. J. (2005). Clinical psychology (7th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.

 

Recommended:

 

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th edition)

 

Course Objectives: This course is designed to provide advanced undergraduate psychology majors with an overview of the professional issues and responsibilities of clinical psychologists.

 

Course Description: While this course is basically a lecture course, it is hoped that students will read material ahead and will be prepared to engage in meaningful class discussion. Class lectures will be related to, but not identical with, material presented in the text, and you will be tested on both; therefore, regular class attendance is required.

 

            Grades will be based on four equally weighted exams, which will consist of both multiple choice and essay questions.

 

Grades:  Exams                                   (4 @ 100 points each)           

 

Tentative Schedule

 

Part 1 - Chapters 1-5:  1/17 – 2/9

            Exam I:  2/14

 

Part 2 - Chapters 6-10:  2/16 – 3/6

            Exam II:  3/8

 

Part 3 - Chapters 11-15:  3/20 – 4/12

            Exam III:  4/17

 

Part 4 - Chapters 16 -20:  4/19 – 5/3

Exam IV:  Tuesday, 5/8 (Note:  Exam IV is scheduled during Final Exams.

This final is scheduled for 1:00 p.m.)

 

Attendance Policy:  Students are allowed three (3) absences. Once you exceed this limit, whether the absences are excused or not, you may be dropped from the course with a grade of “F.” I will not be responsible for recording attendance for students who are tardy.

 

Ten (10) points extra credit may be obtained by maintaining perfect attendance, defined as having no unexcused absences. Absences are excused only under the following circumstances:

 

            1.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student was unable to attend class on the day(s) of the absence;

            2.         the student provides a written excuse from a medical practitioner stating     

                        that the student’s dependent child was ill on the day(s) of the absence;

            3.         the student provides a written excuse from an official of Midwestern State

                        University stating that the student was in attendance at a mandatory

                        university function on the day(s) of the absence.

 

In order for an absence to be excused, the written excuse must be provided within one week of the absence.

 

Funerals, employment-related absences, illnesses not requiring medical attention, job interviews, family emergencies, automobile problems, court appearances, etc. do not constitute excused absences.

 

Make-up Policy:  You may make up one (1) missed exam: if you miss more than one exam, you should drop the course. A mass make-up for exams will be administered on Tuesday, 5/8, following the final exam. No other make-ups will be allowed; if you miss an exam during this semester, you must attend this session. Failure to do so will result in a grade of “0” on the missed exam.

 

Cheating Policy:  Any evidence of cheating on exams, or of plagiarism on papers, will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F”.

 

Note:  Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Also note: Pagers and cell phones are to be turned off during class. If you have a situation that requires you to receive calls, you need to contact me ahead of time, have your device on vibration mode, and take the call outside the classroom.


 




Education Background

Institution Degree    Graduation Date
University of Arkansas Ph.D. Aug 16 1991 12:00AM 
Midwestern State University M.A. Dec 20 1986 12:00AM 
University of Texas at Dallas B.A. Jan 7 1978 12:00AM 



Employment Background

Institution Position Start Date / End Date
 Arkansas Mental Health Services Division, Little Rock, Arkansas  Intern  August, 1990  August, 1991
 Midwestern State University  Assistant Professor of Psychology  August, 1991  May, 1997
 University of Wyoming  Adjunct Professor of Psychology  August, 1999  May, 2000
 Private Practice  Clinical Psychologist  August, 1999  August, 2000
 Helen Farabee MHMR  Consultant  December, 1992  July, 1998
 Wichita Falls State Hospital and Vernon State Hospital  Consultant  July, 1996  August, 1999
 Midwestern State University  Associate Professor of Psychology  May, 1997  Present



Research and Publications

 

Holliman, N. H. & Guthrie, P. C. (1989).  A Comparison of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory and the California Psychology Inventory in Assessment of a Nonclinical Population.  Journal of Clinical Psychology, 45 (3), 373-382.

 

Guthrie, P. C. & Mobley, B. D. (1994).  A Comparison of the Differential Diagnostic Efficiency of Three Personality Disorder Inventories.  Journal of Clinical Psychology, 50, 656-665.

 

Skinner, S. & Guthrie, P. C. (2000). A simple technique to aid in the assessment of resistant children. Innovations in Clinical Practice: A Source Book (Vol. 18). Sarasota FL: Professional Resource Press.

 

Guthrie, P.C. (2001). Personality characteristics of non-violent sexual offenders. In L. Smith (ed). Faculty Papers of Midwestern State University. Wichita Falls, TX: Midwestern State University Press.