Detailed Information for Michael Vandehey

Dr. Michael A. Vandehey 
Psychology
 » Professor
Office Location
O'Donohoe Hall 112 
Phone
Voice: (940) 397-4026
Fax: (940) 397-4682
 
 

Contact Information

michael.vandehey@mwsu.edu

My Websites

http://faculty.mwsu.edu/psychology/michael.vandehey

Department Personal Website

Interests

Career Counseling and Testing

Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychology and Testing

Family Therapy

GLBT Counseling


Course Information

  Semester Course #    Section Course Name Location Days / Times
Details Fall 2014 6153/63/73  101  Practicum I, II, & III    Prothro-Yeager Hall OD110

Syllabus

Practicum

PSYC 6153, 6163, 6173

Fall 2014

 

Professor: Michael A. Vandehey, Ph.D.                                 Office: O’donohoe 114

Office Hours: MWF 9:00-10:00                                                          Phone: 397-4026

                       TR 9:00-11:00

Class Time: R 2:00-4:50 + individual supervision                  Location: OD 110

Home: 940-761-1942                                                              Cell: 940-733-4388

 

Goals:

            1. Increase professional service through:

a. the implementation of psychological services under the supervision of licensed professionals.

b. seeking peer consultations in group supervision.

c. providing peer consultations in group supervision.

d. apply ethical decision-making, theoretically grounded treatment goals, and assessing the appropriateness of diagnosis to individuals seeking psychological treatment.

 

            2. Increase professional development through:

                        a. preparation of an extensive case write-up.

b. becoming acquainted with secretarial duties associated with managing paperwork.

c. attending various meetings.

  

Texts:

 

Yalom, I. D. (2002). The Gift of Therapy: An Open Letter to a New Generation of Therapists and Their Patients. New York, NY: Harper Collins.

 

American Psychiatric Association. (2013) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed. Treatment Revision). Washington, DC: Author.

 

American Psychiatric Association. (2000) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed. Treatment Revision). Washington, DC: Author.

 

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Ed.). (2010).

Washington D. C.: American Psychological Association.

            -1st printed manuals contain errors. Please go to the APA website    (www.apastyle.org) to download the corrected pages for their book in PDF form.

 

 

Prerequisites

 

1. In the semester prior to enrolling in Practicum I (PSYC 6153), students are expected to attend the weekly group supervision/practicum class. Students are not required to complete graded assignments or enroll in the

course.

 

2. Prior to any client contact (approximately 6 weeks prior to the end of the pre-practicum semester), students must apply for and purchase Professional Liability Insurance from American Professional Agency, INC. You can apply for and pay for the insurance online at https://www2.americanprofessional.com/cgibin/STUNEWAD Please choose 1 million/3 million as the insurance limits. The cost is for the insurance is $35. Please email a copy of your insurance certificate to the Director of Clinical Training. Students will need to renew their insurance annually as long as they areproviding clinical services as a student.

 

3. Students must also complete a criminal background check prior to seeing clients. The form can be downloaded on the important forms page of the graduate program website

(http://libarts.mwsu.edu/psychology/ma/Form_index.as ). The completed form should be submitted to the department secretary by mid-term of the pre-practicum semester.

 

Course Requirements

 

1. Students will provide 10-15 hours of practicum related services throughout the entire semester. Students will obtain a minimum of 150 service hours over the course of the semester. Ideally students will amass additional hours.

 

            a. Direct contact hours: Students will obtain a minimum 50 hours of direct client contact. Direct contact hours include:

                        i. Individual, couple, family, or group psychological services

                        ii. Psychological assessment involving client contact

            b. Indirect professional service hours: Students will obtain a minimum 100          hours of indirect professional service hours. Professional service hours include:

                        i. Individual and group supervision

                        ii. Scoring and report writing for psychological assessment

                        iii. Office duties

                        iv. Shadowing fellow clinician

                        v. Professional consultation and educational workshops that are clinical in                          nature

            c. Tracking Hours: Hours should be logged in the practicum hours tracking          spreadsheet found on the important forms page of the graduate program website.        This first page (showing cumulative hours) should be printed, signed by the             individual supervisor and practicum course instructor, and submitted to the             director of clinical training at the semester midterm and at the end of the semester.

 

Students are not allowed to terminate service provision upon completion of hours prior to end of the semester. Some students request that they begin working prior to the first day of class or work over break and between semesters. These hours count towards an ‘Incomplete’ from the previous semester or towards the next practicum. In some external practicum sites, such as Red River, First Step, or the State Hospital, the programs come to depend on the services provided by practicum students. Please make sure your supervisor is notified at the beginning of your placement of any time that you will take off between semesters. Students at these sites may want to limit their time off between semesters to one week.

 

2. Evaluation of practicum students: Individual supervisors will evaluate the student at semester midterm and at the end of the semester. Students are responsible for providing the supervisor with the Practicum Student Evaluation Form, which can be found on the important forms page of the graduate program website. These forms should be submitted to the director of clinical training. Students will receive an incomplete for the course if these evaluations are not submitted by the end of the semester.

 

3. Chart Review: Periodically throughout the semester, the director of clinical training will review a random selection of client charts. Please see the clinic manual for a copy of the chart review checklist and a list of items that should be included in clinic charts. Each clinician is responsible for making sure that client notes are up to date and signed by the individual supervisor. If appropriate, treatment plans and transfer/termination summaries must be completed and filed. At the end of the semester, one file from each student will be chosen at random, if any required paperwork (contact log, treatment plan,

notes, or termination/transfer summary) is missing, then the student automatically receives a C for practicum that semester.

 

            a. Treatment Plans: By the 3rd session with every client, clinicians will submit a   treatment plan outlining goals for treatment and planned interventions. This initial     treatment plan may include the goals of developing rapport and continuing to       assess presenting problems. The treatment plan document should be updated as      the case conceptualization and treatment plan develops. The clinician will discuss        the treatment plan with the client and involve the client in establishing treatment          goals. The treatment plan will be included in the client’s clinic chart.

 

            b. Termination and Transfer Summaries: At the end of treatment, the clinician will summarize the client’s presentation and progress. This document will be used         to facilitate an immediate transfer or follow-up services sought at a later date.

 

 

4. Group Supervision: All students will come to group supervision prepared to discuss their cases. Attendance is mandatory and absences must be cleared with the instructor or a reduction in grade will occur. Scheduled Case Presentations: The 1st 45-minutes of practicum (1:30-2:15) will be for scheduled student case presentations.

 

            a. The clinician is responsible for providing a one page outline summarizing            services to date. All identifying information should be altered or removed for the           protection of the client. The presentation should include:

                        i. background information: demographics, brief history (only what’s                                    relevant to conceptualization)

                        ii. case conceptualization: problem list, competencies/resources,                                           primary/orienting issue or dx, theoretical conceptualization (using theory                             to understand why these problems at this time for this client)

                        iii. treatment goal & plan

                        iv. question or concern

                        v. video or audio recording cued to relevant section

 

            b. Participants are responsible for:

                        i. asking questions that clarify missing information and deepen the                                      understanding of the client.

                        ii. providing ethical and theoretically based interpretations and                                            recommendations.

 

5. Individual Supervision: Each student clinician will meet at least one hour weekly individually with a supervisor. Individual supervision will often include videotaped presentations of the therapeutic encounter. Attendance is mandatory and absences must be cleared with the instructor or a reduction in grade will occur. Clinic students need to bring:

            a. Cued videotape

            b. Client files with notes completed for sessions since the last supervision meeting

            External students will engage in the supervisory process that is in place at the         external placement. Students completing practicum in an external setting will     meet with one of the clinical faculty for individual supervision of any cases          carried in the Psychology Clinic. Students will be expected to follow of the             policies in the clinic manual while providing services in the clinic.

 

6. Case conceptualization Paper: (100 points each) Every student shall prepare an extensive case conceptualization paper on one client (single spaced). Prac III students should choose a different case from their exit paper for the class paper. The report shall contain the following areas:

            a. Presenting problem/history of the problem

            b. Relevant history

                        i. Family, social, and relational history

                        ii. Educational/work history

                        iii. Medical/Psychological history, including substance abuse

            c. Testing information (if available)

            d. Theoretical conceptualization of the client(s): references (3-5) are appropriate     here

                        i. General description of the theory & how the theory explains                                             psychopathology

                        ii. theoretical conceptualization (using theory to understand why these                                problems at this time for this client, how is the client’s behavior and                               experience consistent with the theory)

            e. Summary of the report (1/2-1 page)

            f. Diagnosis as per the DSM-5

            g. Treatment goals and strategies (references may be appropriate here).

           

Rewrites: An initial grade will be given. Should a paper need a re-write, the student will be given the option of (a) accept the current grade or (b) re-write the paper. The second draft will receive a letter grade – ½ a grade level. Should a second re-write be needed, the student may (a) accept the current grade or (b) re-re-write the paper. The third draft will receive a letter grade – 1 grade level, etc. MSU Clinic students shall provide a video-tape of the most recent session to accompany the paper.

 

Due: Monday October 9th (midterm) and December 4th (final).  

 

Participation: (50 points) The last hour of each class shall comprise of an in depth discussion of Yalom’s ideas. Students are expected to be prepared to offer positive and negative critiques, pose ethical questions, and aid in answering comments by other students. This hour should be fun, energizing, and provide a framework for professional development once you have left the program. Should students fail to demonstrate: (a) being prepared, (b) quality participation, and (c) interest, I reserve the right to have a midterm and final examination (TBA). Each exam will be worth 100 points and will be essay in nature.

 

Each week’s reading assignment shall be determined by the students in the prior week.  

 

Grades: 250-225 = A; 224-200 = B; 199 and lower = F

If we need to have a midterm and final, grades will be based upon a 450 point scale.

 

Important Dates:

 

9/1                               Labor day, no classes

9/29                             Last day for December graduates to file

10/6                             Last day for May graduates to file

10/27                           Last day for “W”

11/26-30                      Thanksgiving break, no classes

 

Attendance: Attendance is required. Since we only meet once a week, a student is allowed 1 absence without penalty. The 2nd absence results in 1 grade drop, the 3rd absence results in a grade of ‘F.’ Being tardy three times will count as an absence. Afterwards, every additional tardy counts as an absence. 

 

 

Make-up Policy: Make-up exams will be essay in nature and can be scheduled with me. I need one week to prepare the exam; thus, the earliest a make-up exam can be taken is one week after the initial exam. See the 2012-2014 Student Handbook and Activities Calendar on Class Attendance Policy (pg. 70-71).

 

Electronic Contact: My cell phone is to be used only be students who have been given it by me (e.g., honor society officers, graduate students). Please do not text me on my cell unless I have personally given you my cell number. If an emergency occurs, ALWAYS contact me day or night. If I am unavailable, contact your individual supervisor, Dr. Spiller (Director of Training), or Dr. Carlston (Graduate Program Coordinator).  

 

Cell Phones and Pagers: Please turn all cell phones and pagers off (no sound) during class. DO NOT text message during class. DO NOT answer your cell phone in class. Exceptions include emergency calls (e.g., birth of child, family member in hospital). Students who are unable to comply will not be allowed to attend class. 

Details Fall 2014 6113  101  Individual Psychotherapy    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

Syllabus

Individual Psychotherapy

PSYC 6113, section 101

Fall 2014

 

Professor: Michael A. Vandehey, Ph.D.                                              Office: O’Donohoe 112

Office Hours: MWF 9:00-10:00                                             Phone: 397-4026

                       TR 9:00-11:00                                                  Location: OD110

Class Time:   T 2:00-4:50

 

Texts: Ivey, A. E., Ivey, M. B., & Zalaquett, C. P. (2013). Intentional interviewing and counseling: Facilitating client development in a multicultural society (8th Ed.). Cengage Learning. 

 

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Ed.). (2010).

Washington D. C.: American Psychological Association.

 

Course Requirements: Grades will be based on your performance on 1 midterm (100 points), 1 final (100 points), and 2 videos plus transcription (200 points).

 

Goals: 1. Become acquainted with interviewing and counseling microskills.

            2. Practice microskills in a safe environment with supportive feedback.

            3. Demonstrate competency with interviewing, rapport building, and suicide assessment.

 

Grade: Tests will be multiple choice and essay. Multiple choice answers will be marked on Scantrons and essay questions will be answered in the space provided on the test. Each student will record two 1-hour sessions (midterm and final) and transcribe the best 20 minutes.

 

400 points are possible and grade ranges are as follows:

 

A = 400-360

B = 359-320

C = 319-280

D = 279-240

F = 239 or lower

 

Videos: The entire session should be provided to the instructor; however, please have the recording cued at the beginning of the 20 minute transcription. Provide an assessment of the microskills used during the session and how one might improve. Please indicate excellent use of skills. I will schedule an appointment with each student to review the video and provide feedback.

 

FINAL GRADING NOTE: This course is foundational for the psychology master’s program. A student cannot receive a final grade higher than the final video. That means, a student may earn an A on both tests, but a C on the final tape would result in a C for the overall course. Psychology is not only academic, but also skills based. If a student should receive a grade below a B on the final tape, I will ask another licensed faculty to review the midterm and final tape and confirm the final grade. ALL videos must be saved until final grades are posted. Loss of video (resulting in another faculty being unable to review the session) will result in a zero for the grade.

 

Recommendation: The text and class will provide multiple opportunities to “reflect” on one’s natural style, skill development, strengths/weaknesses, etc. Serious students will journal about many of these opportunities to monitor self-development and clarify personal values. Although this assignment is not graded, I will be happy to discuss journals with students individually throughout the semester.  

 

Note: Students with disability must be registered with Disability Support Services before classroom accommodations can be provided. Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Make-up Policy: Make-up exams will be essay in nature and can be scheduled with me. I need one week to prepare the exam; thus, the earliest a make-up exam can be taken is one week after the initial exam. See 2012-2014 Student Handbook and Activities Calendar on Class Attendance Policy (pg. 69-71).

 

Electronic Contact: I require 5 working days to be able to read and respond to all email. Please note that my spam filter does keep some emails from getting to me (including my wife). In addition, I do not check email after 5 pm nor on weekends/holidays. My cell phone is to be used only be students who have been given it by me (e.g., honor society officers, graduate students). Please do not text me on my cell unless I have personally given you my cell number.

 

Cell Phones and Pagers: Please turn all cell phones and pagers off (no sound) during class. DO NOT text message during class. DO NOT answer your cell phone in class. Exceptions include emergency calls (e.g., birth of child, family member in hospital). Students who are unable to comply will not be allowed to attend class.

 

Cheating Policy: DON’T! Any evidence of cheating on exams, quizzes, or on the paper will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F.” To avoid questions of cheating, mark Scantrons clearly, use a No. 2 pencil, and erase completely. Errors due to a poorly marked Scantron will not result in a grade change.

 

Travel Plans: Please do not make travel plans during finals week. The final will be given when the university has scheduled it as per the schedule of classes. Early finals will only be offered to graduating seniors with honors.

 

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Days of Class              Reading Assignment

 

8/26-10/14:                  Chapter 1: Toward Intentional Interviewing, Counseling, and             Psychotherapy

                                    Chapter 2: Ethics, Multicultural Competence, and the Positive            Psychology and Wellness Approach

                                    Chapter 3: Attending Behavior and Empathy

                                    Chapter 4: Observation Skills

                                    Chapter 5: Questions: Opening Communication

                                    Chapter 6: Encouraging, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing: Key Skills of          Active Listening

                                    Chapter 7: Reflecting Feelings: A Foundation of Client Experience

 

9/1                               Labor day, no classes

9/29                             Last day for December graduates to file

10/6                             Last day for May graduates to file

 

TESTS:                       10/21

 

10/27                           Last day for “W”

 

Midterm Tape 10/28

 

10/28-12/2:                  Chapter 8: How to Conduct a Five-Stage Counseling Session                                                  Using Only Listening Skills     

                                    Chapter 9: Focusing the Counseling Session: Exploring the Story                                            From Multiple Perspectives     

                                    Chapter 10: Empathetic Confrontation and the Creative New:                                                             Identifying and Challenging Client Conflict

                                    Chapter 11: Reflection of Meaning and Interpretation/Reframe:                                                         Helping Clients Restory their Lives

                                    Chapter 12: Self-Disclosure and Feedback: Immediacy and                                                    Genuineness in Counseling and Therapy

                                    Chapter 13: Concrete Action Strategies for Client Change: Logical                                         Consequences, Instruction/Psychoeducation, Stress Management,                                          and Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes

                                    Suicide Assessment: Additional Material TBA

 

11/26-30                      Thanksgiving break, no classes

 

Final Exam: Tuesday, December 9th 5:45-7:45 p.m.

 

Details Fall 2014 4003  101  Learning    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

Syllabus

Learning

PSYC 4003, Section 101

Fall 2014

 

Professor: Michael A. Vandehey, Ph.D.                                  Office: O’donohoe 112

Office Hours: MWF 9:00-10:00                                  Phone: 397-4026

                       TR 9:00-11:00

Class Time: MWF 10:00-10:50                                                Location: PY 101

                                                                                                                

Texts:

 

Mittenberger, R. G. (2012). Behavior Modification: Principles & Procedures (5th Ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

 

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Ed.). (2010).

Washington D. C.: American Psychological Association.

            -1st printed manuals contain errors. Please go to the APA website       (www.apastyle.org) to download the corrected pages for their book in PDF form.

 

Goals: To become knowledgeable in the application of learning principles to humans (behavioral modification).

a. I will draw additional material from Baldwin & Baldwin (2000) and Chance (2008). The material will be applied to intra- and interpersonal contexts.

 

Expand information manipulation and prepare for graduate coursework.

a. Tests will be over approximately 7 chapters and additional material.

b. Tests will be essay and multiple choice and take two class periods to complete.

c. Having to decipher poorly written multiple-choice questions.

c. Having to choose between the “best” and “almost best” answer.

 

Improve on APA 6th Edition writing skills and library search skills.

            a. Title page

            b. Headings

            c. In-text citations

            d. Reference page(s).

 

Course Requirements: Grades will be based on your performance on 1 midterm, 1 paper, and the final.

 

There will be 1 midterm and 1 final. Each exam will be worth 100 points. Tests will be multiple choice and essay. Multiple choice answers will be marked on Scantrons. Essay questions will be answered on paper I provide.

 

The 5-page, APA paper will be conducted over an applied chapter in the book and will be worth 100 points.

            Paper

                        -Use a title page, headings, and reference page to organize reader

                        -Teach the reader about an approach to behavioral modification

                        -Have four additional sources beyond the chapter

 

*All papers must be turned in electronically. Either use Microsoft Word or open office.

 

Please title all files with: firstname.lastname.CWID#.psyc####.semester.year.typeofproduct

 

By enrolling in this course, the student expressly grants MSU a 'limited right' in all intellectual property created by the student for the purpose of this course.  The 'limited right' shall include but shall not be limited to the right to reproduce the student's work product in order to verify originality and authenticity, and educational purposes.

 

Student Paper Topics:

 

            2-Observing and Recording Behavior

            3-Graphing Behavior and Measuring Change

            13-Understanding Problem Behaviors through Functional Assessment

            12-Behavioral Skills Training Procedures 

            20-Self Management      

            21-Habit Reversal Procedures

            22-The Token Economy

            23-Behavioral Contracts

            24-Fear and Anxiety Reduction Procedures

            25-Cognitive Behavior Modification  

 

300 points are possible in the class:

 

A = 300-270                C = 239-210                F = 179 or lower

B = 269-240                D = 209-180

 

Note: Students with disability must be registered with Disability Support Services before classroom accommodations can be provided. Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Make-up Policy: Make-up exams will be essay in nature and can be scheduled with me. I need one week to prepare the exam; thus, the earliest a make-up exam can be taken is one week after the initial exam. See 2012-2014 Student Handbook and Activities Calendar on Class Attendance Policy (pg. 69-71).

 

Electronic Contact: I require 5 working days to be able to read and respond to all email. Please note that my spam filter does keep some emails from getting to me (including my wife). In addition, I do not check email after 5 pm nor on weekends/holidays. My cell phone is to be used only be students who have been given it by me (e.g., honor society officers, graduate students). Please do not text me on my cell unless I have personally given you my cell number.

 

Cell Phones and Pagers: Please turn all cell phones and pagers off (no sound) during class. DO NOT text message during class. DO NOT answer your cell phone in class. Exceptions include emergency calls (e.g., birth of child, family member in hospital). Students who are unable to comply will not be allowed to attend class.

 

Cheating Policy: Any evidence of cheating on exams or quizzes will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F”. To avoid questions of cheating, mark Scantrons clearly, use a No. 2 pencil, and erase completely. Errors due to a poorly marked Scantron will not result in a grade change.

Travel Plans: Please do not make travel plans during finals week. The final will be given when the university has scheduled it as per the schedule of classes. Early finals will only be offered to graduating seniors with honors.

 

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Days of Class              Reading Assignment

 

8/25-9/5                       Semester Overview/Course Requirements

                                    Chapter 4: Reinforcement

Chapter 5: Extinction

 

9/1                               Labor day, no classes

 

9/12-9/19:                    Chapter 6: Punishment

Chapter 7: Stimulus Control: Discrimination and Generalization

 

9/22-9/26:                    Chapter 8: Respondent Conditioning

 

Monday 9/29:             Multiple Choice Midterm

Wednesday 10/1         Essay Midterm

 

9/29                             Last day for December graduates to file

10/6                             Last day for May graduates to file

 

10/3-10/17                   Chapter 10: Prompting and Transfer of Stimulus Control

                                    Chapter 9: Shaping

                                    Chapter 11: Chaining

 

10/20-10/31:                Chapter 14: Applying Extinction

Chapter 15: Differential Reinforcement

 

10/27                           Last day for “W”

 

11/3-11/14:                  Chapter 16: Antecedent Control Procedures

Chapter 17: Using Punishment: Time-Out and Response Cost

 

11/26-30                      Thanksgiving break, no classes

 

11/17-12/5                   Chapter 18: Positive Punishment Procedures and the Ethics of            Punishment

                                    Chapter 19: Promoting Generalization

 

11/24                           Paper Due (-1/2 a grade per late day)

 

Final Exam: Wednesday, December 10th from 10:30-12:30 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Permission to Post Grades

 

Check One

 

_____  I give Dr. Vandehey Permission to post my grade via the password I have chosen and written below.

 

_____ I do not want my grade posted. DO NOT give me a password, but please give me your CWID and sign it at the bottom.

 

Name (print):                                                               CWID:

 

 

Password:

 

 

 

________________________

Signature                      Date

 

Details Fall 2014 1103  1H1  General Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

Syllabus

General Psychology

PSYC 1103, section 1H1

Fall 2014

 

Professor: Michael A. Vandehey, Ph.D.                                 Office: O’Donohoe 112

Office Hours: MWF 9:00-10:00                                             Phone: 397-4026

                       TR 9:00-11:00                                                  Location: PY 101

Class Time:   TR 11:00-12:20                                                

 

Goals:

 

1. Engage in weekly discussions about historical and current topics as related to the chapters.

            1. Write 5 reaction papers taking a stand on the issue.

            2. Apply psychological knowledge to the topic.

            3. Engage in public discourse about a variety of topics.

 

2. To increase multiple-choice test-taking skills and improve study skills/time management. This will be accomplished by:

            1. Taking 5 tests.

            2. Instruction on study and test-taking skills.

            3. Having questions over sections of the chapter that are not discussed in class.

            4. Having to decipher ambiguously written questions.

            5. Having to choose between the “best” and “almost best” answer. 

 

3. Be introduced to the exciting field of psychology.

            1. Each chapter is a survey of a major area of study within the field.

            2. In-class group exercises.

 

Texas Core Objectives (Competency Based)

1.      Critical Thinking Skills—including creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.

2.      Communication Skills—including effective development, interpretation, and expression of ideas through written communication.

3.      Empirical and Quantitative Skills—including the analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions.

4.      Social Responsibility—including intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities.

 

 

 

 

 

Text: King, L. A. (2014). The science of psychology: An appreciative view (3nd Ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill   

           

Note: Connect: Psychology can be found at www.mcgrawhillconnect.com

From the Publisher: This online, interactive program focuses on building students’ 21st Century skills through interactions, project-based learning, listening, journaling, and self-evaluation. This anytime, anywhere program prepares students academically, socially, and cognitively for college and career. It addresses all aspects of college and career readiness, including areas in which students report needing help, such as personal and life skills, like time management and self-motivation; 21st Century skills like lateral thinking and problem solving; exploring careers against lifestyle choices, wants, and needs; and the relevancy of academic skills.

 

Course Requirements: Grades will be based on five reaction papers, performance on 3 out of 4 exams, and a final.

 

(50 points-10 points each) Reaction papers are to be two double-spaced pages and include two peer-reviewed references (Wikipedia and .com-web-pages do not count as a reference). Papers are to take a side and argue for it. Personal opinion is appropriate as long as there is support for it in the literature. Feedback will be provided over the semester to aid with academic growth. Some students may be asked to read their papers to the group. Topics are negotiable. If something occurs during the semester, we may replace a listed topic with an emerging one (e.g., arming teachers). In addition, students may suggest topics, and if time permits, additional topics will be added. 

 

(200 points-50 points each) Each exam will be worth 50 points and the lowest score will be dropped. This means a student who has earned an “A” average on the first 4 exams does not have to attend the final (those students will be notified after the 4th exam). Students with a “B+” or lower must attend the final. Tests will be multiple choice and answers will be marked on Scantrons. I reserve the right to add essay questions at any point during the semester.

 

Texas Core Objectives (Competency Based)

 

Midterm Exam I (15 points): Being a good consumer of research is essential in the global economy. A 15-item additional test will be administered at the end of the first exam. These questions will directly measure your understanding of psychological research design and entry-level statistics.

 

Midterm Exam II (10 points): By the midterm, you will develop a list of your three favorite theoretical perspectives in psychology. The purpose of this activity is to help you to ‘think psychologically’ about the world around you. You will be asked to list and describe each of these perspectives. These perspectives will then be used during the final exam to address a societal, interpersonal or personal problem. This portion of the exam will contribute 25% toward your grade on that exam. Answers will be graded on (a) whether you listed three recognizable psychological perspectives, (b) the accuracy of your descriptions, and (c) the structural and grammatical adequacy of your answer.

 

Final Exam (15 points): A portion of your final exam will include an essay component that requires you to address an issue of social, interpersonal, or personal concern (e.g., an unproductive employee, a student who can’t control his spending, religious intolerance) from the perspective of one of your psychological theories or perspectives listed at the midterm. This portion of the exam will account for 25% of your grade on the final exam. Answers will be graded on (a) your ability to address the problem from one of the psychological perspectives, (b) the strength and accuracy of your argument, (c) your level of empathy, ethics, and respect for diversity in your response, and (d) the structural and grammatical adequacy of your answer.

 

Research Requirement

 

(10 points) It is important that students of scientific psychology learn firsthand something about the scientific nature of the discipline. Therefore, all students in PSYC 1103 and 2203 are required to participate in one of the following research-related exercises. No extra credit is given for research participation, but failure to complete the research requirement will result in a one letter grade reduction for the course. The deadline for completing the research requirement is MONTH, DAY, YEAR.

 

1.   Participate in one or more psychology research projects totaling at least 90 minutes. Research opportunities will be announced throughout the semester in postings that appear at  http://mwsu.edu/academics/libarts/psychology/research-options

 

OR

 

2.   Complete a research ethics essay. Participating students will read academic writings addressing research ethics. Following this, students will complete a 3 or 4 page double-spaced, typed summary and review of the information they read. Tables, figures, pictures do not count toward the minimum page requirement. Essays must be submitted no later than MONTH, DAY, YEAR.

 

300 points are possible and grade ranges are as follows:

 

A = 300-270

B = 269-240

C = 239-210

D = 209-180

F = 179 or lower

 

 

Note: Students with disability must be registered with Disability Support Services before classroom accommodations can be provided. Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Electronic Contact: I require 5 working days to be able to read and respond to all email. Please note that my spam filter does keep some emails from getting to me (most recently my wife). In addition, I do not check email after 5 pm nor on weekends/holidays. My cell phone is to be used only be students who have been given it by me (e.g., honor society officers, graduate students). Please do not text me on my cell unless I have personally given you my cell number.

 

Graduating Seniors: Only graduating seniors who are graduating with honors (Cum Laude or better) and are on the honors list from the registrar are excused from taking the final.

 

Make-up Policy: Make-up exams will be essay in nature and can be scheduled with me. I need one week to prepare the exam; thus, the earliest a make-up exam can be taken is one week after the initial exam. See the 2012-2014 Student Handbook and Activities Calendar on Class Attendance Policy (pg. 70-71).

 

Cell Phones and Pagers: Please turn all cell phones and pagers off (no sound) during class. DO NOT text message during class. DO NOT answer your cell phone in class. Exceptions include emergency calls (e.g., birth of child, family member in hospital). Students who are unable to comply will not be allowed to attend class.

 

Cheating Policy: Any evidence of cheating on exams or quizzes will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F”. To avoid questions of cheating, mark Scantrons clearly, use a No. 2 pencil, and erase completely. Errors due to a poorly marked Scantron will not result in a grade change.

 

Travel Plans: Please do not make travel plans during finals week. The final will be given when the university has scheduled it as per the schedule of classes. Early finals will only be offered to graduating seniors with honors.

 

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Weeks                        Reading Assignment

 

8/26-9/11                                 Semester Overview/Course Requirements

                                    Study and test taking skills

            Chapter 1-What is Psychology?

            Chapter 2-Psychology’s Scientific Method

                                                Chapter 5-States of Consciousness

 

                                    Topics: Correlation versus Causation and its misuse by the media.

                                                 Drinking age

 

9/1                               Labor day, no classes

 

Tuesday 9/16:                        Exam I

 

9/18-10/2                                 Chapter 6-Learning

                                                Chapter 17-Health Psychology

 

                                    Topics: Use of YouTube to advertise for free and attract young                              viewers.

                                                Legalization of Marijuana  

 

9/29                             Last day for December graduates to file

10/6                             Last day for May graduates to file

                                   

Friday 10/7:               Exam II

            *First two papers must be turned in by Exam II

 

10/9-10/21                               Chapter 9-Human Development

 

                                    Topics: Should we require a license to be a parent?

                                                 Adolescent sexual behavior

                                                 Emerging Adulthood

 

10/27                           Last day for “W”

 

Thursday 10/23:        Exam III

            *all corrections from first two papers due.

 

10/28-11/6                               Chapter 11-Gender, Sex, and Sexuality

                                                Chapter 12-Personality

 

                                    Topics: Gay Marriage

                                                 Impact of Poverty on Personality

 

Tuesday 11/11:          Exam IV

            *Third and fourth papers must be turned in by Exam IV

 

 

11/13-12/4                               Chapter 15-Psychologyical disorders

                                                Chapter 16-Therapies

 

                                    Topics: Politics of DSM-IV to DSM-5 diagnostic changes

                                                 Does therapy work?

 

11/26-30                      Thanksgiving break, no classes

 

*Last paper must be turned in by 12/2 as well as all corrections from the third and fourth papers.

 

 

Final Exam: Tuesday, December 9th from 1:00-3:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Permission to Post Grades

 

Check One

 

_____  I give Dr. Vandehey Permission to post my grade via the password I have chosen and written below.

 

_____ I do not want my grade posted. DO NOT give me a password, but please give me your CWID and sign it at the bottom.

 

Name (print):                                                               CWID:

 

 

Password:

 

 

 

________________________

Signature                     Date

 

Details Spring 2014 6103  201  Vocational Assessment & Counseling    Prothro-Yeager Hall 201

Syllabus

Vocational Assessment and Counseling

Psychology 6103, section 201

Spring 2014

 

Professor: Michael A. Vandehey, Ph.D.                                  Office: O’donohoe 112

Office Hours: MWF 10-11:45                                     Phone: 397-4026

Class Time: W 12:30-3:20                                           Location: PY 102

 

Goals:

 

1. Become familiar with career development and career counseling.

            a. Be able to understand difference between career education and career    counseling.

b. Be able to apply needed service based upon clients developmental level and needs.

 

2. Be trained in a model for selecting and interpreting career tests with clients.

            a. Do not rely on assessment as sole way of providing career services.

b. Be able to integrate personality assessment and client self-report in career services.

 

3. Prepare to work with clients from a variety of educational and training backgrounds in a global economy.

 

Texts: Andersen, P., & Vandehey, M. A. (2012). Career counseling and development in a global economy (2nd Ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

 

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Ed.). (2010).

Washington D. C.: American Psychological Association.

 

Instruments Used:

 

Self-Directed Search ($1.60)

Strong Interest Inventory (Counseling Center-$10.00)

Meyers-Brigs Type Indicator ($1.00)

Card Sort (Bring 3X5 cards on appointed day)

Kuder Journey career planning system (free)

 

Total to Barbara: $2.60

 

 

 

Course Requirements: Grades will be based on your performance on 2 tests and a vocational report.

 

Each exam will be worth 100 points. Each test may consist of multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, or matching, AND essay. Multiple choice answers will be marked on Scantrons. Essays will be answered in the space provided on the test.

 

The report will be worth 100 points and consist of applying 1 personality test, 2 career tests (SII; Kuder), and a card sort to appropriate personal information. The combination will be used to write a report with the career diamond as the organization for the paper. Please use a biopsychosocial format (presenting problem, history of the problem, soc/fam history, medical history, assessment results, and an integration summary with recommendations). The paper is to be single spaced and will typically be between 4-6+ pages.  

 

300 points are possible in the class:

 

A = 300-270                C = 239-210                F = 179 or lower

B = 269-240                D = 209-180

 

Attendance: Attendance is required. Since we only meet twice a week, a student is allowed 3 absence without penalty. The 4nd absence results in 1 grade drop, the 5rd absence results in a grade of ‘F.’ Being tardy three times will count as an absence. Afterwards, every additional tardy counts as an absence. 

 

Note: Students with disability must be registered with Disability Support Services before classroom accommodations can be provided. Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Make-up Policy: Make-up exams will be essay in nature and can be scheduled with me. I need one week to prepare the exam; thus, the earliest a make-up exam can be taken is one week after the initial exam. See 2012-2014 Student Handbook and Activities Calendar on Class Attendance Policy (pg. 69-71).

 

Cell Phones and Pagers: Please turn all cell phones and pagers off (no sound) during class. DO NOT text message during class. DO NOT answer your cell phone in class. Exceptions include emergency calls (e.g., birth of child, family member in hospital). Students who are unable to comply will not be allowed to attend class.

 

Cheating Policy: Any evidence of cheating on exams or quizzes will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F”. To avoid questions of cheating, mark Scantrons clearly, use a No. 2 pencil, and erase completely. Errors due to a poorly marked Scantron will not result in a grade change.

 

Travel Plans: Please do not make travel plans during finals week. The final will be given when the university has scheduled it as per the schedule of classes. Early finals will only be offered to graduating seniors with honors.

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Weeks                        Reading Assignment

 

1/15-3/5                       Chapter 1: Context for Career Services

                                    Chapter 2: The Career Diamond: A Teaching Tool

                                    Chapters 3, 4, & 5: Career Theories

                                    Chapter 6: Career Counseling for the Global Economy

 

1/20                             Martin Luther King’s Birthday, no classes

2/17                             Last day for May graduates to file

3/10                             Last day for “W”

 

Wednesday 3/5:         Exam I

 

3/12-4/30                     Chapter 8: Career Counseling Process

Chapter 9: Career Counseling Techniques

Chapter 10: Assessment and Career Counseling

Chapters 15 and 16: Career Counseling for Emerging Adulthood    and Adults

Chapter 7: Career Issues for a Diverse Work Force

Chapter 17: Professional Issues: Ethics and Research

 

3/17-3/21                     Spring break, no classes

 

4/2                               Scores for personality and career tests due

4/9                               Career Report: rough draft due

 

4/16-4/18                     Easter break, no classes

 

4/23                             Career Report: final due     

 

Final Exam: Wednesday, May 7th from 3:30-5:30 p.m.

 

 

Welcome to the Kuder® Journey™ career planning system!

 

College Students

 

Thank you for giving your students the opportunity to experience and explore reliable online resources that provide comprehensive education and career guidance.

For system access, instruct your students to complete the following:

· Go to www.kuderjourney.com.

· Click New users register here!

· Select Student and choose a college grade level from the drop-down menu.

· Click Continue.

· During the registration process, create a unique user name and password. When asked for an activation code, enter J3778848QAG.

 

9-12 Grade

 

Thank you for giving your students the opportunity to experience and explore reliable online resources that provide comprehensive education and career guidance.

 

For system access, instruct your students to complete the following:

· Go to www.kudernavigator.com.

·Click New users register here!

·Select Student and choose a 9-12 grade level from the drop-down menu.

·Click Continue.

· During the registration process, create a unique user name and password. When asked for an activation code, enter N3778844UKC.

 

Details Spring 2014 5213  201  Theories of Counseling    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102

Syllabus

Theories of Counseling

PSYC 5213, section 201

Spring 2014

 

Professor: Michael A. Vandehey, Ph.D.                                 Office: O’donohoe 112

Office Hours: M 10:30-11:00, 12-12:30; 3:30-4:00               Phone: 397-4026

                        W 10:30-12:30; 3:30-4:00

                        F 9-11:00

                        TR 10:30-11:00, 12:30-2:00; 3:30-4:00          

 

Class Time: M 12:30-3:20 p.m.                                               Location: PY 102

 

Texts: Seligman, L. W., & Reichenberg, L. W. (2014). Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: Systems, Strategies, and Skills (4th Ed).  Merrill Counseling

 

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Ed.). (2010).

Washington D. C.: American Psychological Association.

 

Course Requirements: Grades will be based on your performance on 1 midterm (100 points), 1 final (100 points), and a paper (100 points).

 

Goals: 1. Become acquainted with many of the major theories of counseling.

            2. Identify 1-2 theories as main foundation for providing services.

            3. Become aware of the impact of the self on practicing psychology.

 

Grade: Tests will be multiple choice and essay. Multiple choice answers will be marked on Scantrons and essay questions will be answered in the space provided on the test. The paper is to be written in APA 6th Ed. format and is to be 7-10 pages not including title or reference pages.

 

300 points are possible and grade ranges are as follows:

 

A = 300-270

B = 269-240

C = 239-210

D = 209-180

F = 179 or lower

 

Paper: The paper for this course is different for the typical graduate paper. It is a “know thyself” paper that will be based upon weekly take-home exercises. Through the take-home exercises and bi-weekly group discussions, the student should begin to identify personal strengths, weaknesses, and beliefs (e.g., religious, political, morals/values, race, gender, etc.) that may positively or negatively impact the therapeutic relationship. The majority of the paper will be about those three areas, and the student is expected to regularly cite Kerr (question/page number) as he/she responds to the exercises. The final area will be about the theoretical orientation that best fits the student’s personal style. Please note: this exercise is not designed to limit the student’s theoretical orientation. It is designed to help the student identify the theory that would be a good beginning point for professional development and practice. It is expected that the student will expand his/her theoretical knowledge and practice base throughout the program and career. 

 

Papers are due by the end of class. Late papers will lose one grade for every day they are

late.

 

I will provide handouts from: Kerr, D. R. (2000). Becoming a therapist: A workbook for personal exploration. Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press.

 

Note: Students with disability must be registered with Disability Support Services before classroom accommodations can be provided. Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Electronic Contact: I require 5 working days to be able to read and respond to all email. Please note that my spam filter does keep some emails from getting to me (most recently my wife). In addition, I do not check email after 5 pm nor on weekends/holidays. My cell phone is to be used only be students who have been given it by me (e.g., honor society officers, graduate students). Please do not text me on my cell unless I have personally given you my cell number.

 

Make-up Policy: Make-up exams will be essay in nature and can be scheduled with me. I need one week to prepare the exam; thus, the earliest a make-up exam can be taken is one week after the initial exam. See 2012-2014 Student Handbook and Activities Calendar on Class Attendance Policy (pg. 69-71).

 

Cell Phones and Pagers: Please turn all cell phones and pagers off (no sound) during class. DO NOT text message during class. DO NOT answer your cell phone in class. Exceptions include emergency calls (e.g., birth of child, family member in hospital). Students who are unable to comply will not be allowed to attend class.

 

Cheating Policy: Any evidence of cheating on exams or quizzes will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F”. To avoid questions of cheating, mark Scantrons clearly, use a No. 2 pencil, and erase completely. Errors due to a poorly marked Scantron will not result in a grade change.

 

Travel Plans: Please do not make travel plans during finals week. The final will be given when the university has scheduled it as per the schedule of classes. Early finals will only be offered to graduating seniors with honors.

 

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Weeks of Class            Reading Assignment

 

1/13-2/24:                    Semester Overview/Course Requirements

Chapter 1: Contexts of Effective Treatment

Chapter 2: Overview of Background-Focused Treatment Systems

Chapter 3: Sigmund Freud and Classic Psychoanalysis

Chapter 4: Alfred Adler and Individual Psychology

Chapter 15: Overview of Action-Focused Treatment Systems

                                    Chapter 16: Behavior Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

                       

Packet 33: Why be a Therapist?

Packet 1: What helps when…

Packet 2: What about Advice?

Packet 13: Teaching

Packet 12: Questions

Packet 8: Expanding Options

 

Additional Topics:       Prochaska & Norcross (2007): Assessing likelihood of change

                                    Levels of Change

                                   

1/20                             Martin Luther King’s Birthday, no classes

 2/17                            Last day for May graduates to file

 

Monday 2/24: Exam I

 

10/12-11/30:                Chapter 7: Overview of Emotion-Focused Treatment Systems

                                    Chapter 8: Carl Rogers and Person-Centered Counseling

                                    Chapter 9: Existential Therapy

                                    Chapter 10: Gestalt Therapy

                                    Chapter 18: Family systems Approaches

                       

Packet 18: Family

                                    Packet 26: Shame

                                    Packet 25: Interpersonal Warmth

Packet 14: Tracking Feelings

Packet 24: Expressing your Feelings

Packet 23: Experiencing Feelings

 

Additional Topics:       Levine & Sandeen: Biological and Limited-Capacities Models

 

3/10                             Last day for “W”

3/17-3/21                     Spring break, no classes

4/16-4/18                     Easter break, no classes

                                   

4/28                             Paper Due

 

Final Exam: Monday the 5th from 3:30 p.m. till 5:30 p.m.

Details Spring 2014 3603  201  Abnormal Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

Syllabus

Abnormal Psychology

PSYC 3603, section 201

Spring 2014

 

Professor: Michael A. Vandehey, Ph.D.                                              Office: O’donohoe 112

Office Hours: M 10:30-11:00, 12-12:30; 3:30-4:00               Phone: 397-4026

                        W 10:30-12:30; 3:30-4:00

                        F 9-11:00

                        TR 10:30-11:00, 12:30-2:00; 3:30-4:00          

 

Class Time: 2:00-3:20 TR                                                        Location: PY 101

 

Goals: Think about abnormal behavior across multiple dimensions.

            1. Learn about the transition from 5 axes of diagnosis to 1.

            2. Understand the different approaches to abnormal behavior.

            3. Diagnose based upon limited information (vignettes).

            4. View interviews with actual individuals living with psychopathology. 

 

Organize and master a large amount of information.

            1. Tests will cover information from the text and lecture.

 

Improve on APA 6th Edition writing skills and library search skills.

            a. Title page

            b. Headings

            c. In-text citations

            d. Reference page(s).

            e. Use the library.

            f. Become familiar with book, journal, and internet references.

             

Texts: Comer, R. J. (2014). Abnormal Psychology (8th Ed.). New York, NY: Worth Publishers.

 

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Ed.). (2010).

Washington D. C.: American Psychological Association.

            -1st printed manuals contain errors. Please go to the APA website    (www.apastyle.org) to download the corrected pages for their book in PDF form.

 

Stapler: papers must be stapled and will not be accepted unless stapled.

 

Course Requirements: Grades will be based on your performance on 1 exam, a final, and a paper.

 

Each exam will be worth 100 points. Tests will be multiple choice and essay. Multiple choice answers will be marked on Scantrons, I will provide space for essay answers. I reserve the right to change the tests in any way to better assess the class at any point during the semester.

 

The paper will be 5-7, double-spaced, typewritten pages (excluding the title page and references) and is worth 100 points. It must be written in APA 6th edition format (citing in paper, reference page, use of headings, title page, etc.). Seven references are required and may not include general psychology, developmental, abnormal, etc. textbooks (you may use these texts if you already meet the initial 7-reference requirement). References may include academic books and peer review journals. Please use the DSM-5 as one of your references. Only two references may come from internet sites. You must provide me a copy of the first page of every article/internet cite (abstracts will not be accepted). For books, I need the title page, reference page (the very next page), and the first page of every chapter cited in the book. Please keep a full photocopy of every reference. I reserve the right to request your full references if concerns about the paper arise. Finally, 1-2 small quotes are appropriate; however, large quotes are not original work and will not count toward the 5-page minimum (this may come up as students cite large sections of the DSM-5). Papers will lose 1 grade level for every day they are late.

 

IN ADDITION to turning in a physical copy of one’s paper, all papers must be turned in electronically (michael.vandehey@mwsu.edu ). Either use Microsoft Word or WordPerfect Corel. Please save your file in the following manner:

firstname.lastname.CWID#.psyc####.semester.year

 

The following outline is an example of possible sections:

            1. Introduction/definition of disorder

            2. History of the disorder

            3. Diagnostic criteria/differential diagnosis

            4. Treatment/Prognosis

5. Conclusion (not a rewrite of the introduction. It is to be a place for the student to present his/her own ideas based upon an integration of the information learned). 

* On occasion, a student wishes to discuss personal/family experience with a disorder. This is acceptable provided it is less than 2 pages and does not count towards the 5-page minimum.

 

300 points are possible and grade ranges are as follows:

 

A = 300-270

B = 269-240

C = 239-210

D = 209-180

F = 179 or lower

 

Note: Students with disability must be registered with Disability Support Services before classroom accommodations can be provided. Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

 

 

Make-up Policy: Make-up exams will be essay in nature and can be scheduled with me. I need one week to prepare the exam; thus, the earliest a make-up exam can be taken is one week after the initial exam. See 2012-2014 Student Handbook and Activities Calendar on Class Attendance Policy (pg. 69-71).

 

Electronic Contact: I require 5 working days to be able to read and respond to all email. Please note that my spam filter does keep some emails from getting to me (including my wife). In addition, I do not check email after 5 pm nor on weekends/holidays. My cell phone is to be used only be students who have been given it by me (e.g., honor society officers, graduate students). Please do not text me on my cell unless I have personally given you my cell number.

 

Cell Phones and Pagers: Please turn all cell phones and pagers off (no sound) during class. DO NOT text message during class. DO NOT answer your cell phone in class. Exceptions include emergency calls (e.g., birth of child, family member in hospital). Students who are unable to comply will not be allowed to attend class.

 

Cheating Policy: DON’T! Any evidence of cheating on exams, quizzes, or on the paper will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F.” To avoid questions of cheating, mark Scantrons clearly, use a No. 2 pencil, and erase completely. Errors due to a poorly marked Scantron will not result in a grade change.

 

Travel Plans: Please do not make travel plans during finals week. The final will be given when the university has scheduled it as per the schedule of classes. Early finals will only be offered to graduating seniors with honors.

 

Graduating Seniors: Only graduating seniors who are graduating with honors (Cum Laude or better) and are on the honors list from the registrar are excused from taking the final.

 

By enrolling in this course, the student expressly grants MSU a 'limited right' in all intellectual property created by the student for the purpose of this course.  The 'limited right' shall include but shall not be limited to the right to reproduce the student's work product in order to verify originality, authenticity, and for educational purposes.

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Days of Class              Reading Assignment

 

1/14-2/27:                    Semester Overview/Course Requirements

                                    Chapters 8, 9, 10: Problems of Mood

            -In children pp. 522-525

                                    Chapter 5: Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Related Disorders

                                                -In children 520-521

Chapter 6: Stress Disorders

ADHD: pp. 530-535

Autism: pp. 539-545

 

 

 

 

DSM-5

Depressive Disorders; Bipolar and Related Disorders;

Impulse-Control Disorders; Autism Spectrum Disorder;

Anxiety Disorders; Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders

Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders

 

1/20                             Martin Luther King’s Birthday, no classes

 

TEST:                                   3/4 MC and Vignettes

 

Topics due                  Tuesday 3/11

 

3/6-5/1                         Chapter 11: Eating Disorders

                                                -Body Dysmorphic Disorder pp. 200-202

                                    Chapter 16: Personality Disorders

                                    Chapters 14 & 15: Problems of Psychosis

                                    Dissociative Disorders pp. 202-221

Chapter 13: Disorders of Sex and Gender

 

DSM-5

Eating Disorders

            -body dysmorphic disorder

Personality Disorders ; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other   Psychotic Disorders; Dissociative Disorders

Sexual Dysfunctions; Gender Dysphoria; Paraphilic Disorders

 

2/17                             Last day for May graduates to file

3/10                             Last day for “W”

3/17-3/21                     Spring break, no classes

 

 

*Preread (optional) with sources (physical and e-copy): Tuesday 4/1

 

*Physical paper and e-copy due with sources: Tuesday 4/15

 

4/16-4/18                     Easter break, no classes

 

Final Exam: Thursday, May 8th 1:00p.m.-3:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Permission to Post Grades (Abnormal)

 

Check One

 

_____  I give Dr. Vandehey Permission to post my grade via the password I have chosen and written below.

 

_____ I do not want my grade posted. DO NOT give me a password, but please give me your CWID and sign it at the bottom.

 

Name (print):                                                               ID Number:

 

 

Password:

 

 

 

________________________

Signature                     Date

 

Details Spring 2014 1103  206  General Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102

Syllabus

General Psychology

PSYC 1103, section 206

Spring 2014 

 

Professor: Michael A. Vandehey, Ph.D.                                 Office: O’Donohoe 112

Office Hours: M 10:30-11:00, 12-12:30; 3:30-4:00               Phone: 397-4026

                        W 10:30-12:30; 3:30-4:00

                        F 9-11:00

                        TR 10:30-11:00, 12:30-2:00; 3:30-4:00                      

 

Class Time:   TR 11:00-12:20                                                 Location: PY 102

 

Goals: To increase multiple-choice test-taking skills and improve study skills/time management. This will be accomplished by:

            1. Taking 5 tests.

            2. Instruction on study and test-taking skills.

            3. Having questions over sections of the chapter that are not discussed in class.

            4. Having to decipher ambiguously written questions.

            5. Having to choose between the “best” and “almost best” answer. 

 

Be introduced to the exciting field of psychology.

            1. Each chapter is a survey of a major area of study within the field.

            2. In-class group exercises.

 

Texas Core Objectives (Competency Based)

1.      Critical Thinking Skills—including creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.

2.      Communication Skills—including effective development, interpretation, and expression of ideas through written communication.

3.      Empirical and Quantitative Skills—including the analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions.

4.      Social Responsibility—including intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities.

 

Text: King, L. A. (2011). The science of psychology: An appreciative view (2nd Ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill   

           

Note: Connect: Psychology can be found at www.mcgrawhillconnect.com

From the Publisher: This online, interactive program focuses on building students’ 21st Century skills through interactions, project-based learning, listening, journaling, and self-evaluation. This anytime, anywhere program prepares students academically, socially, and cognitively for college and career. It addresses all aspects of college and career readiness, including areas in which students report needing help, such as personal and life skills, like time management and self-motivation; 21st Century skills like lateral thinking and problem solving; exploring careers against lifestyle choices, wants, and needs; and the relevancy of academic skills.

 

 

Course Requirements: Grades will be based on your performance on 3 out of 4 exams and a final.

 

Each exam will be worth 50 points and the lowest score will be dropped. This means a student who has earned an “A” average on the first 4 exams does not have to attend the final (those students will be notified after the 4th exam). Students with a “B+” or lower must attend the final. Tests will be multiple choice and answers will be marked on Scantrons. I reserve the right to add essay questions at any point during the semester.

 

Texas Core Objectives (Competency Based)

 

Midterm Exam I (15 points): Being a good consumer of research is essential in the global economy. A 15-item additional test will be administered at the end of the first exam. These questions will directly measure your understanding of psychological research design and entry-level statistics.

 

Midterm Exam II (10 points): By the midterm, you will develop a list of your three favorite theoretical perspectives in psychology. The purpose of this activity is to help you to ‘think psychologically’ about the world around you. You will be asked to list and describe each of these perspectives. These perspectives will then be used during the final exam to address a societal, interpersonal or personal problem. This portion of the exam will contribute 25% toward your grade on that exam. Answers will be graded on (a) whether you listed three recognizable psychological perspectives, (b) the accuracy of your descriptions, and (c) the structural and grammatical adequacy of your answer.

 

Final Exam (10 points): A portion of your final exam will include an essay component that requires you to address an issue of social, interpersonal, or personal concern (e.g., an unproductive employee, a student who can’t control his spending, religious intolerance) from the perspective of one of your psychological theories or perspectives listed at the midterm. This portion of the exam will account for 25% of your grade on the final exam. Answers will be graded on (a) your ability to address the problem from one of the psychological perspectives, (b) the strength and accuracy of your argument, (c) your level of empathy, ethics, and respect for diversity in your response, and (d) the structural and grammatical adequacy of your answer.

 

235 points are possible and grade ranges are as follows:

 

A = 235-211

B = 210-188

C = 187-164

D = 163-141

F = 140 or lower

 

Note: Students with disability must be registered with Disability Support Services before classroom accommodations can be provided. Individuals requiring special accommodation may contact me after class or during office hours.

 

Graduating Seniors: Only graduating seniors who are graduating with honors (Cum Laude or better) and are on the honors list from the registrar are excused from taking the final.

 

Make-up Policy: Make-up exams will be essay in nature and can be scheduled with me. I need one week to prepare the exam; thus, the earliest a make-up exam can be taken is one week after the initial exam. See 2012-2014 Student Handbook and Activities Calendar on Class Attendance Policy (pg. 69-71).

 

Electronic Contact: I require 5 working days to be able to read and respond to all email. Please note that my spam filter does keep some emails from getting to me (including my wife). In addition, I do not check email after 5 pm nor on weekends/holidays. My cell phone is to be used only be students who have been given it by me (e.g., honor society officers, graduate students). Please do not text me on my cell unless I have personally given you my cell number.

 

Cell Phones and Pagers: Please turn all cell phones and pagers off (no sound) during class. DO NOT text message during class. DO NOT answer your cell phone in class. Exceptions include emergency calls (e.g., birth of child, family member in hospital). Students who are unable to comply will not be allowed to attend class.

 

Cheating Policy: Any evidence of cheating on exams or quizzes will result in dismissal from this class with a grade of “F”. To avoid questions of cheating, mark Scantrons clearly, use a No. 2 pencil, and erase completely. Errors due to a poorly marked Scantron will not result in a grade change.

 

Travel Plans: Please do not make travel plans during finals week. The final will be given when the university has scheduled it as per the schedule of classes. Early finals will only be offered to graduating seniors with honors.

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Weeks                         Reading Assignment

 

1/14-1/31                                 Semester Overview/Course Requirements

                                    Study and test taking skills

            Chapter 1-What is Psychology?

            Chapter 2-Psychology’s Scientific Method

                                                Chapter 5-States of Consciousness

 

1/20                             Martin Luther King’s Birthday, no classes

 

Tuesday 2/4:                           Exam I + 15-item research exam

 

2/6-2/20                                   Chapter 11-Gender, Sex, and Sexuality

                                                Chapter 12-Personality

 

2/17                             Last day for May graduates to file

 

Tuesday 2/25:                         Exam II + 3 theoretical perspectives

           

2/27-3/11                                 Chapter 9-Human Development

 

3/10                             Last day for “W”

 

Thursday 3/13:                       Exam III

 

3/17-3/21                     Spring break, no classes

           

3/25-4/10                                 Chapter 6-Learning

                                                Chapter 17-Health Psychology

                                   

 Thursday 4/10:                      Exam IV

           

4/15-4/29                                 Chapter 15-Psychological disorders

                                                Chapter 16-Therapies

 

4/16-4/18                     Easter break, no classes

 

*Thursday 5/1:                                   All Make-Up Exams

           

 

 

Final Exam + essay question: Tuesday, May 6th from 1:00-3:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Permission to Post Grades

 

Check One

 

_____  I give Dr. Vandehey Permission to post my grade via the password I have chosen and written below.

 

_____ I do not want my grade posted. DO NOT give me a password, but please give me your CWID and sign it at the bottom.

 

Name (print):                                                               CWID:

 

 

Password:

 

 

 

________________________

Signature                      Date

Details Fall 2013 6113  101  Individual Psychotherapy    Prothro-Yeager Hall OD 110
Details Fall 2013 3603  101  Abnormal Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101
Details Fall 2013 1103  105  General Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 102
Details Fall 2013 1103  1H1  General Psychology Honors    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101
Details Fall 2012 6133  101  Marriage and Family Therapy    O'Donohoe Hall 110

Class Time: 2:00-3:20 TR

 

Tentative Reading and Exam Schedule

 

Days of Class              Reading Assignment    Gold=Goldenberg & Goldenberg

Mc=McGoldrick  

                                                                        Price=Price, Price & McKenry

 

8/28-8/30:                    Semester Overview/Course Requirements

Intro to family systems

 

9/3                               Labor day, no classes

 

9/4-9/6:                        Intro to genograms

                                    Movie

 

9/11-9/13                     Gold Chapter 2: Family Development: Continuity and Change

                                    Price: none

 

9/11-9/13                     Gold Chapter 3: Gender, Culture, and Ethnicity in Family Functioning

                                    Price: student choice

 

9/18-9/20                     Gold Chapter 4: Interlocking Systems: The Individual, The Family, and The Community

                                    Price: student choice

 

9/25-9/27                     Gold Chapter 8: Transgenerational Models

                                    Price: student choice

 

8/28-9/25                     Mc = Chapter 1-Chapter 9 (read as fast as you can)

 

9/27:                            Family Interview & Genogram Due

 

10/1                             Last day for December graduates to file

 

10/2-10/4                     Gold Chapter 9: Experiential Model

                                    Price: student choice

 

10/8                             Last day for May graduates to file

 

10/9-10/11                   Gold Chapter 10: Structural Model

                                    Price: student choice

 

10/16-10/18                 Gold Chapter 11: Strategic Models

Price: student choice

 

10/22                           Last day for “W”

 

10/23-10/25                 Gold Chapter 12: Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Models

                                    Price: student choice

 

10/30-11/1                   Gold Chapter 13: Solution-Focused Therapy and Collaborative Therapy

                                    Price: student choice

 

 

11/6-11/8                     Gold Chapter 14: Narrative Therapy

                                    Price: student choice

 

11/13-11/15                 Gold Chapter 15: Psycho-educational Models

                                    Price: student choice

 

11/20:                          Example of a family presentation, genogram, and case

Conference

 

11/21-25                      Thanksgiving break, no classes

 

11/27-12/6:                  Student Genogram Presentations

 

*If needed, we will meet during finals week to complete student presentations: Time/Date is TBA and will be scheduled around graduate students other finals.

 

Details Fall 2012 1433  1H1  Honors introductory Seminar    Dillard College of Business Administration 317

Date                Speaker/Topic

 

Miller = “Finding Darwin’s God: A Scientist’s Search for Common Ground Between God and Evolution”

 

8/27-8/31         Introduction to each other, the Introductory Seminar, and the Honors Program

Honors Program and Intro Seminar Issues, Time Management

MBTI inventory

Miller Chapter 1

 

9/3                   Labor Day-No class (a good day to read your textbooks)

 

9/5-9/7                         Choosing topics for papers and presentations

                        Writing hints and Plagiarism

                        What is a reflection?

                        Miller Chapter 2

 

9/10-9/14         Ed Schultz-Religion in School, & Texas Politics: A Comparison and Critical Analysis of the 2012

Democrat and Republican Platforms                

                        Miller Chapter 3

 

9/17-9/21         Mike Collins-Darwinism, both Scientific and Social, in America after 1859 with possible discussion of

The Scopes Trial in 1925

                        Miller Chapter 4

 

9/24                 Class discussion     9/28          : Reflections #1 due

 

9/26-9/28         MBTI verification and validation

Understanding MBTI

MBTI exercises

Miller Chapter 5

 

10/1-10/5         Jeff Blacklock-School Prayer-An Evolution of the Separation of Church and State in the United States    

                        Miller Chapter 6

 

10/8                 Class discussion     10/12: Reflections #2 due

 

10/10-10/12     Library Week-Meet in the Atrium by the Honors Program Lounge

                        Miller Chapter 7

 

10/15               Term paper prospectus due

 

10/15-10/19     Linda Veazey-Court Battles over the Teaching of Creation science vs. Evolution in Schools 

                        Miller Chapter 8

 

10/22-10/26     Kirsten Lodge-The Western Perception of Animals from Antiquity to the Present

                        Miller Chapter 9

 

10/29               Class discussion     11/2: Reflections #3 due

 

10/31-11/2       Oral Presentation issues: Do’s and Don’ts; Library time

 

 

11/5-11/9         Candice Fulton- From  Magic to Chemistry,  Experimental Trials and Tribulations of Famous Religious

Scientists, and Science - a Study Tool, not an Explanation nor a Replacement for Faith (1 topic per

day)                 

 

11/12-11/16     Jeff Stambaugh-The birth, Growth, Maturity, and Decline (Death?) of Research in Motion               

 

11/16 Oral presentation abstract due

 

11/19              Class discussion     11/26: Reflections #4 due

                       

11/21-11/23     Thanksgiving-No Class

 

11/26-11/30     Student Presentations week 1              

 

12/3                 Term paper due

 

12/3-12/7         Student Presentations week 2

Details Fall 2012 1103  1H1  General Psychology    O'Donohoe Hall 101

Class Time: TR 11:00-12:20

Details Fall 2011 5213  101  Theories of Counseling    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

See attached syllabus below.

Details Fall 2011 3303  102  Writing in Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

See attached syllabus below.

Details Fall 2011 1103  1H1  General Psychology: Honors    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

See attached syllabus below.

Details Spring 2011 6103  201  Career Assessment and Counseling    Prothro-Yeager Hall OD 110

Professor: Michael A. Vandehey, Ph.D.                                 Office: O’donohoe 112

Office Hours: MWF 9:00-10:55; TR 8:30-10:25                    Phone: 397-4026

Class Time: W 1:30-4:30 p.m.                                     Location: OD 110

Details Spring 2011 3303  101  Writing in Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall PY 101

Professor: Michael A. Vandehey, Ph.D.                                  Office: O’donohoe 112

Office Hours: MWF 9:00-10:55; TR 8:30-10:25        Phone: 397-4026

Class Time: TR 12:30-1:50                                          Location: PY 101

Details Spring 2011 1103  204  General Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall PY101

Professor: Michael A. Vandehey, Ph.D.                                  Office: O’donohoe 112

Office Hours: MWF 9:00-10:55; TR 8:30-10:25        Phone: 397-4026

Class Time: 11:00-11:50 MWF                                                Location: PY 101

Details Fall 2010 6133  101  Marriage and Family Therapy    Prothro-Yeager Hall 110

See attached syllabus below.

Details Fall 2010 3303  101  Writing in Psychology    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101

See attached syllabus below.

Details Fall 2010 1103  1H1  General Psychology: Honors    Prothro-Yeager Hall 101
 
See attached Syllabus Below.



Education Background

Institution Degree    Graduation Date
Indiana State University M.S. Aug 11 1995 12:00AM 
Indiana State University Ph.D. Aug 13 1999 12:00AM 
Univserisity of Oregon B. A. Mar 21 1992 12:00AM 



Employment Background

Institution Position Start Date / End Date
 Iowa State University  Psychology Intern  August 1998  July 1999
 Midwestern State University  Professor of Psychology  August 1999  Present



Research and Publications

Marsh, C. M., & Vandehey, M. A., & Diekhoff, G. M. (2008). The Predictive Power of an Introductory Class in Determining Academic Success. Journal of General Education, 57(4), 244-255. 

Peden, J., Stiles, B. L., Vandehey, M. A., & Diekhoff, G. (2008).  The Effects of External Pressures and Competitiveness on Characteristics of Eating Disorders and Body Dissatisfaction. Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 32(4), 415-429. 

Vandehey, M.A., Diekhoff, G. M., & LaBeff, E. E. (2007). College cheating: A twenty-year follow-up and the addition of an honor code. Journal of College Student Development, 48, 468-480. 

Andersen, P., & Vandehey, M. A. (2006). Career counseling and development in a global economy. Boston: Lahaska Press/Houghton Mifflin. 

Vandehey, M. A., Marsh, C. M., & Diekhoff, G. M. (2005). Providing students with instructors’ notes: Barriers to the practical application of previous research. Teaching of Psychology, 32(1),49-52.

Vandehey, M. A., Shuff, I. M., and Diekhoff, G. M. (2003). Stage of HIV-infection and embeddedness within social support networks. Journal of HIV/AIDS and Social Services, 2(2), 21-40. 

Kennedy, T., Vandehey, M. A., Norman, W. B., & Diekhoff, G. M. (2003). Recommendations for risk management practices. Journal of Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 34(3), 309-311.

Vandehey, M. A. & Shuff, I. M. (2001). HIV-infection and stage of illness: A comparison of family, friend, and professional social support providers over a two-year period. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 11, 2217-2229.