Detailed Information for Timothy Justus

Timothy Justus 
Music
 » Chair
Office Location
Fain Fine Arts Center C117F 
Voice: (940) 397-4502
 
 

Music
 » Associate Professor
Office Location
Fain Fine Arts Center C117F 
  

Contact Information

timothy.justus@mwsu.edu

My Websites

Interests

Music Theory, Orchestration and Composition

Arranging for Jazz Ensemble, Orchestra and Wind Bands

Classical Guitar and other guitar styles including Blues and Latin

Samba, Bossa Nova and other Brazilian guitar styles

Chamber music for guitar with strings


Course Information

  Semester Course #    Section Course Name Location Days / Times
Details Fall 2014 MUSC 2613  101  Theory IV    Fain Fine Arts Center C117A

MUSC 2613 Music Theory IV

Fall 2014

 

Course Number:             MUSC 2613 Music Theory IV

Section Number:           101

Location:                        FA C117 A

Class Time:                    10:00-10:50 AM

Instructor:                     Dr. Tim Justus                            397-4502

                                       timothy.justus@mwsu.edu           FA C117F     

Course Description:

MUSC 1613, Music Theory IV is a continuation of Music Theory III, and constitutes a study of the fundamentals of pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony and form in the context of the expanded tonal music of the late 19th centuries, and rhythmic, harmonic and melodic elements of the 20th century. Activities include practice in writing this style, and analysis of selected pieces.

Course Objectives:

Continued understanding of the structure of the music of the 19th century as related to melody, chord progression, and voice leading, and practice in writing short exercises in the style, and an introduction to the music of the 20th century, and rhythmic, harmonic and melodic techniques and resources.

 

Textbook:

No text book required. Study material will consist of instructor handout material, appropriate musical scores and recordings.

Other Required or Recommended Reading:

          N/A

 

Other Materials Needed:

Manuscript paper, soft lead pencils, ruler or straight edge, and other music manuscript preparation materials. (All work will be done in pencil. Specific assignments may be accomplished on Finale®.)

 

Course Evaluation:

          Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of lecture, analysis, in-class performance and exercise, assigned textbook reading assignments, out of class work, handouts, discussion and computer assisted learning and composition.

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

 

33%   Class work, homework, class participation, attendance

 

33%   Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be           made up.

 

33%   Exams

There will be five (5) exams. At least a week notice will be given prior to exams. Missing an exam is highly discouraged. Make up exams are given at the convenience of the instructor. All exams will be taken in pencil. The final exam will not be weighted any heavier than other exams, but will however be cumulative, due to the nature of the course content. The final exam will be given during the final exam period. The final exam may not be made up. There will be no exceptions. Travel or flight plans, work, concerts, lessons etc., are not valid excuses.

 

Student Honor Creed:

 

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class.  While no specific number of unexcused absences will result in the reduction of grade, unexcused absences exceeding three (3) will result in forfeiture of the option to take make-up exams, turn in make-up assignments, and the consideration of borderline grade averages.

 

Absences will have consequences.

  • Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.
  • In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

  • Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.
  • Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.
  • Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Sequence for course work:

Because the course content is delivered based on the learning pace of the class it is not possible to determine a specific day that a topic will be covered or an exam given. The general topic sequence will be:

  1. Background text reading, presentation of topic material and practice classwork
  2. Quiz
  3. Additional in class practice
  4. Exam

Topic Schedule

 

Week

Topic

1

Brief review of tonal theory/ altered dominant chords

2

Expanded tonicization

3

Expansion of tonality/Wagner

4

Expansion of tonality, cont.

5

9th/11th/13 chords

6

Understanding modality

7

Modality, cont.

8

Melodic/harmonic resources of Impressionism

9

Impressionism, cont.

10

Pandiatonicism

11

Panditonicism, cont.

12

Atonality

13

Serialism

14

Minimalism

15

Current trends

16

Final Exam

 

N.B. Because classwork often does not move at an exact pace, this schedule may be altered as necessary.

 

 

Details Fall 2014 MUSC 2603  101  Theory III    Fain Fine Arts Center C117A

MUSC 2603 Music Theory III

Fall 2014

 

Course Number:             MUSC 2603 Music Theory III

Section Number:           101

Location:                        FA C117 A

Class Time:                    9:00-9:50 AM

Instructor:                     Dr. Tim Justus                            397-4502

                                       timothy.justus@mwsu.edu           FA C117F

Course Description:

MUSC 2603, Music Theory III is a continuation of Music Theory II, and constitutes a study of the fundamentals of pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony and form in the context of the tonal music of the common practice period of the 18th and 19th centuries. Activities include practice in writing this style, and analysis of selected pieces. In combination with Sight Singing and Ear Training, this course forms the essential foundation for continued study of music at all levels.

Course Objectives:

Continued understanding of the structure of the music of the 18th and 19th century as related to melody, chord progression, voice leading, and practice in writing short exercises in the style.

 

Textbook:

Jones, Thaddeus. Music Theory. Harper-Collins.

Other Recommended or Required Reading:

          N/A

 

Other Materials Needed:

Manuscript paper template will be provided, soft lead pencils, or mechanical pencil, ruler, and other music manuscript preparation materials, 3-ring binder for handout and supplemental material. (All work will be done in pencil. Specific assignments may be accomplished on Finale®.)

 

Course Evaluation:

          Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of in class demonstration, analysis, in-class performance and exercises, assigned textbook reading assignments, out of class work, handouts, discussion and computer assisted learning and composition.

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

 

33%   Class work/class participation

Classwork assignments will be done in and out of class and graded in class.

 

33%   Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be made up.

 

33%   Exams

Exams will be given over announced topics and graded on a 100 point scale. At least one week notice will be given prior to exams. Missing an exam day is highly discouraged. Make up exams are given at the convenience of the instructor. All exams will be taken in pencil. The final exam will not be weighted any heavier than other exams, but will however be cumulative, due to the nature of the course content. The final exam will be given during the final exam period. The final exam may not be made up, no exceptions. Travel or flight plans, work, concerts, lessons etc., are not valid excuses.

 

Sequence for course work:

Because the course content is delivered based on the learning pace of the class it is not possible to determine a specific day that a topic will be covered or an exam given. The general topic sequence will be:

  1. Background text reading, presentation of topic material and practice classwork
  2. Quiz
  3. Additional in class practice
  4. Exam

Student Honor Creed:

 

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of learning the material. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class.

 

Absences have consequences.

  • Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.
  • In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

  • Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.
  • Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.
  • Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week

Topic

1

Review of Tonal Theory

2

Diatonic Seventh Chords

3

Melody Writing

4

Cadences

5

Harmonizing a Melody

6

Dominant Seventh Chord

7

V7 Chord, cont.

8

Borrowed Chords/Mode Mixture

9

Secondary Dominants, V/V

10

Other Secondary Dominants

11

Secondary Leading tone 7ths

12

Neapolitan Sixth Chord

13

Neapolitan Sixth, cont.

14

Augmented Sixth Chords

15

Augmented Sixth Chords, cont

16

Review

 

Final Exam

 

N.B. Because classwork often does not move at an exact pace, this schedule may be altered as necessary.

 

Music Theory Rubric

 

 

Very Good
91-100 pts

Good
 81-90 pts

Fair
70-80 pts

Poor
61-70

 

 

Excellent

 

Good

 

Fair

 

Poor

 

 

 

Music Notation/

Manuscript

Music manuscript is very neat and all required elements are included: Clef Sign, Time and Key Signature correct.  All notes are written neatly using proper barline placement.

Music manuscript is neat. Two or less of the required elements are missing from the musical score.

Most notes are written clearly using the proper barline placement.

Music manuscript is legible. Three to four of the required elements are missing from the musical score.

Notes are written clearly, but barline placement is often incorrect

Music manuscript is illegible and many of the required musical score elements are missing. Notes are written in a sloppy and illegible manner

Poor

 

Meter and Rhythm

Excellent

All measures have the correct beats and a variety of rhythms are used.

Good

85% of measures have the correct beats and a variety of rhythms are used.

Fair

70% of the measures have the correct of beats.

Poor

Under half of the measure have the correct beats. Composition needs to be edited and resubmitted.

 

 

Harmony

Excellent

Triads/chords correctly spelled with proper doubling, spacing, proper inversions, correct figured bass notation

Good

Triads and other chords correctly spelled at least 90% with correct doublings, spacing, inversions and figured bass.

Fair

Triads and other chords correctly spelled at least 80% with correct doublings, spacing, inversions and figured bass. .

Poor 

Triads and other chords incorrectly spelled at least 30% with correct doublings, spacing, inversions and figured bass.

 

 

Overall Impression

Excellent

The composition was in the style, clean/easy to read, and included all required elements.

Good

The composition was somewhat in the style and legible. Most of the required elements were included.

Fair

The composition was very basic and somewhat in the style to read. At least half of the required elements were included.

Poor 

The composition was not complete, and very difficult to read. Under half of the required elements were included.

 

 

Roman Numeral Chord Progression

Excellent

Assignment contains 100% accurate figured bass notation and proper chord progression/movement according to instruction and the common practice style

Good

Assignment contains 90% accurate figured bass notation and proper chord progression/movement according to instruction and the common practice style

Fair

Assignment contains 80% accurate figured bass notation and proper chord progression/movement according to instruction and the common practice style 

Poor 

Assignment contains 50% accurate figured bass notation or less and 50% proper chord progression/ movement according to instruction and the common practice style

 

 

               

 

Details Fall 2014 AMU"S 2552  102  Trumpet    Fain Fine Arts Center C117F

MIDWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Music

 

 

  1. AMUS 2552

Applied Trumpet

2  Credit Hours

Instructor: Dr. Tim Justus

Office Hours: As Posted or by Appointment

 

  1. Course Description:

 

Applied study on trumpet. The information in this syllabus/course of study is intended to give the student the information necessary to be successful in the applied course of study on trumpet leading to the completion of the BS in Music Education of the BA in Music.  

 

Required Materials:

  1. Instrument of sufficient quality and working order to allow advanced study
  2. The student is expected to provide the necessary equipment for maintaining the instrument:
    1. Instrument lubricants, cleaning equipment, etc.
    2. Mouthpiece
    3. Music and other printed material as should become necessary
  3. Practice Log/Practice Diary (A notebook in which to date and record practice, lesson assignments, suggestions, observations, etc.)
  4. A medium sized three-ring binder
  5. Other suggested material:
  6. Metronome
  7. Auto Tuner (optional)

 

  1.  Learning Outcomes:

 

A.   Learning Outcomes

     

      The graduate of this program will have demonstrated: the

 

  1. The ability to analyze and evaluate musical performance from various perspectives and to receive responsively, suggestions about criticism of his/her own performance from others.

 

2.    A high proficiency on a specific instrument.

 

 

B.   Course Learning Outcomes

 

  1. Increase trumpet performance skills including:
    1. physical skills of tone production, breath control, and finger technique
    2. aural and visual skills including sight-reading and transposition
    3. awareness, understanding and synthesis of the elements required for sensible interpretation in musical performance
  2. Familiarity with the musical and pedagogical literature associated with the trumpet
  3. Stimulation of an interest in the professional literature related to the trumpet and to brass playing
  4. Familiarity with and understanding of the basics of brass pedagogy
  5. A practical understand of the learning process aimed at increased efficiency and economy in skill acquisition on order to
  6. acquire a constructive problem solving attitude
  7. enhance the time spent in practice and study of t he trumpet
  8. Develop through listening, the awareness, appreciation and critical discernment of various styles and types of music
  9. Stimulate interest in and development of improvisational and compositional skills as they relate to trumpet performance
  10. Develop and apply appropriate strategies for dealing with performance anxiety
  11. Acquire self motivation, initiative and ability for continued study beyond the formal educational environment.

 

IV.  Course Content Outline:

 

Freshman Semester I

 

Materials:

*Trumpet Studio Scale Syllabus (Justus)

*36 Vocalises (Concone/Justus)

Complete Conservatory Method for Cornet/Trumpet (Arban)

Technical Studies for Cornet/Trumpet (Clarke)

Thirty Six Celebrated Etudes (Bousquet)

Solos from the Studio Solo List (See Appendix 2)

*(Available from instructor)

 

Semester requirements are only outlined in the syllabus. Specific methods, etudes and other material may be selected in consultation with the instructor and according to the individual’s development

 

Requirements:

  1. Proficiency in all major scales, arpeggios and major sevenths according to scale syllabus
  2. Technique patterns in Clarke
  3. 12 Etudes from Bousquet
  4. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)
  5. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

  1. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)
  2. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)
  3. Faculty Jury (See music handbook)
  4. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)
  5. Transposition up one step (B flat to C trumpet)
  6. Development of a comprehensive practice routine

 

Freshman Semester II

 

Requirements:

  1. Proficiency in all minor scales, arpeggios and minor sevenths
  2. Technique patterns in Clarke
  3. 12 Etudes from Bousquet
  4. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)
  5. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

  1. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)
  2. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)
  3. Faculty Jury
  4. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)
  5.  Transposition down one step (C trumpet to B Flat)
  6. Continuation of the practice routine

 

Sophomore Semester I

 

Materials:

*Trumpet Studio Scale Syllabus (Justus)

*36 Vocalises (Justus)

Complete Conservatory Method for Cornet/Trumpet (Arban)

Technical Studies for Cornet/Trumpet (Clarke)

Thirty Six Celebrated Etudes (Bousquet)

Selected Studies (Voxman) or other etude studies

Solos from the Studio Solo List

*(Available from instructor)

 

Requirements:

  1. Proficiency in all mixolydian, arpeggios, dominant sevenths according to scale syllabus
  2. Technique patterns in Clarke
  3. 12 Etudes from Bousquet
  4. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)
  5. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

  1. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)
  2. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)
  3. Faculty Jury
  4. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)
  5. Transposition up a third (D trumpet)
  6. Continuation of the practice routine

 

Sophomore Semester II

 

Requirements:

  1. Proficiency in all whole tone and blues scales, and diminished sevenths
  2. Technique patterns in Clarke
  3. 12 Etudes from Voxman
  4. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)
  5. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

  1. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)
  2. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)
  3. Faculty Jury for Upper Level Study
  4. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)
  5. Transposition down a half step (A trumpet)
  6. Continuation of the practice routine

 

Junior Semester I

 

Materials:

36 Vocalises (Justus)

Complete Conservatory Method for Cornet/Trumpet (Arban)

Technical Studies for Cornet/Trumpet (Clarke)

36 Orchestral Etudes and Last Studies (Brandt)

50 Standard Orchestral Excerpts (Justus)

Solos from the Studio Solos List

 

Requirements:

  1. Technique patterns in Clarke, etc.

3.  Etudes from Voxman

4. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)

5. Significant progress in tone production, technique, development,  

    articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special  problems

6. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)

7. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)

8. Faculty Jury

9. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)

10. Transposition up a fourth (E flat trumpet)

11. Continuation of the practice routine

12. Preparation of Junior Recital

13. Preparation of Standard Orchestral Excerpts

 

Junior Semester II

 

Requirements:

1. Technique patterns in Clarke

2. 12 Etudes from Brandt

3. 12 Etudes from Vocalises

4. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

5. Recital Class Performance (Although the MUA 100 is no longer a

    required class, performance majors will perform at least once a

    semester.)

6. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)

7. Faculty Jury for Upper Level Study

8. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)

9. Transposition up a fifth (F trumpet)

10. Continuation of the practice routine

11. Performance of Junior Recital

12. Preparation of Standard Orchestral Excerpts

 

Senior Semester I

 

Materials:

*36 Vocalises (Justus)

Complete Conservatory Method for Cornet/Trumpet (Arban)

Technical Studies for Cornet/Trumpet (Clarke)

36 Transcendental Etudes (Charlier)

Solos from the Studio Solos List

 

Requirements:

  1. Technique patterns in Clarke, et. al.

2. 12 Etudes from Charlier

3. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)

4. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

5. Development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special

    problems

6. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)

7. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)

8. Faculty Jury

9. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)

10. Transposition up an augmented fourth, B flat (E trumpet) and C (third)

11. Continuation of the practice routine

12. Preparation of Senior Recital

13. Preparation of Standard Orchestral Excerpts

 

Senior Semester II

 

Requirements:

1. Technique patterns in Clarke, et. al.

2. 12 Etudes from Charlier

3. 12 Etudes from Vocalises

4. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

5. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)

6. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)

7. Faculty Jury for Upper Level Study

8. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)

9 Transposition up a fifth (F trumpet) C trumpet (fourth)

10. Continuation of the practice routine

11. Performance of Senior Recital

12. Preparation of Standard Orchestral Excerpts

 

V.   Teaching Strategies:

 

The following course activities may be included in the course of study:

 

  1. Practical techniques for maintaining the instruments
  2. Practice suggestions for literature preparation
  3. Pattern recognition and assimilation, including finger coordination, breathing, articulation, memorization, etc.
  4. Etude analysis
  5. Listening to selected recordings
  6. Selected Reading
  7. Guided historical and pedagogical research (See Appendix 1)
  8. Public performance
  9. Attendance of live performances
  10. Building resume/repertoire

 

VI.  Assessment:

 

Procedures for assessing performance (Grading):

The studio grade will be determined from performance in three areas, weekly studio, studio final exam, and faculty jury.

Weekly Studio:

Each lesson will be graded with the exception of the first lesson, which will be an assessment lesson and a discussion of your long and short term goals. Lesson grades will be averaged and will constitute one third (1/3) of the total grade.

 

Studio Final Exam:

There will be a studio final exam each semester which will constitute one third (1/3) of the final grade. The studio exam will consist of the following:

 

  1. Scales/Technique: successful performance of all scales, arpeggios, technical exercises, etc., studied during the semester, and pass off material.
  2. Etudes: One etude of the student’s choice (prepared) and one etude of the instructor’s choice, selected from the etudes studied during the semester.
  3. Sight reading: sight reading will be required

 

Faculty Jury:

 

The final faculty jury will consist of one third (1/3) of the final grade.

(The instructor is the final authority in all matters of studio and applied grade.)

 

Grading Scale:

 

91-100         A

81-90           B

71-80           C

61-70           D

 

Grade Expectations:

 

To receive a grade of A: (excellent)

Arrive on time with lesson assignment thoroughly prepared and virtually flawless, perform ahead of chronological years, significantly reduced or solved errors or problems from previous lessons, demonstrate a sincere desire and enthusiasm to study through questions, actions and attitudes which exceed expectations.

"Be ye therefore perfect,"… (Matthew 5:48).

 

To receive a grade of B: (above average)

Arrive on time with lesson assignments well prepared, perform at or near chronological years, evidence of attention to problems from previous lessons, demonstrate an attitude of passive cooperation and willingness to meet expectations.

 

To receive a grade of C: (average)

Arrive occasionally late with lesson assignments partially prepared, (containing flaws) perform somewhat at or below the chronological years, evidence of some attention to problems from previous lessons, demonstrates an attitude of passive cooperation

 

To receive a grade of D: (below average)

Arrive frequently late with lesson assignment largely unprepared, perform behind chronological years, little evidence of attention to problems from previous lessons, demonstrate frequent lapses of concentration or attention, uncooperative attitude toward instruction.

 

Student Honor Creed:

 

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of learning the material. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class.

 

Absences have consequences.

  • Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.
  • In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

  • Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.
  • Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.
  • Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

VI. Upper Level Study:

At the end of the second year of study, the student will be required to demonstrate technical mastery of the instrument in the faculty jury. In addition to the jury solo are included all major and minor scales, arpeggios, and sevenths, dominant and diminished seventh arpeggios, (memorized) a section of a technical etude and sight reading.

 

Other Miscellaneous Information

  1. Bring everything that you will play anywhere, as a solo, to your lesson for me to hear. This includes prominent solo passages in ensemble music (Wind Ensemble, Orchestra, Concert Band etc.), church performances, musicals, solos, etc. Your performance everywhere reflects on you, the university and your teacher.
  2. Inform me well in advance of any auditions or performances outside the MSU Department of Music, or of applied study with another teacher. (Applied study with another teacher is encouraged; I just want to know about it.)
  3. Take responsibility for your life. Keep a calendar with you at all times to avoid scheduling conflicts or missed events.
  4. Present yourself appropriately and observe proper decorum in all musical and academic settings. (For example, it is not appropriate to wear a hat or cross your legs in rehearsals or lessons, nor is it permitted to carry food or drink into rehearsals, classrooms, or concert halls.) Show respect for yourself and for others by observing these simple courtesies.
  5. Be early and well-prepared for all rehearsals and lessons.

 

 

Suggestions for Successful Progress

  1. Always be positive and enthusiastic about your love for music and the trumpet, and demonstrate this in your playing and your cooperation with other musicians.
  2. Maintain a regular, daily practice schedule of at least two hours each day.
  3. Develop with your teacher, a warm-up & practice routine covering all aspects of playing (40-60 minutes) and work on it each day.
  4. Plan practice sessions so that they are goal oriented, purposeful and directed at accomplishing specific results. Write your goals for each session in a notebook. Establish both short-term and long-term goals for yourself. Record when you achieve these goals.
  5. Always be well prepared! Be early to lessons with all your materials ready, and with plans about what you will do in the lesson. Have your questions written out so that you ask them at the beginning of the lesson.
  6. Understand that developing performance skills may at times be a slow and demanding process. Patience and persistence are important traits for success in music.
  7. Take advantage of opportunities to attend live musical performances of all kinds. More than any other event, the live performance encourages us to persevere, practice and succeed. The live performance helps us to understand that “we can do this.” Attend lectures, master-classes, professional seminars, and summer professional programs.
  8. Seek opportunities to perform in public. After learning a work, perform it several times and keep it in your repertoire, eventually memorizing it.
  9. Collect and study recordings of solo works, chamber music, orchestral music, and jazz that include your instrument.
  10. Own the necessary "tools of the trade." These include a quality instrument(s),

mutes, metronome, tuner, and music (including methods, etudes, solos, and orchestral excerpts).

11. Record your practice sessions periodically, and evaluate them objectively.

12. More practice.

13. Be resourceful! Look for orchestral and solo scores in the library.

14. Get a head start on performance anxiety by playing in front of your

     colleagues whenever possible. Memorize!

15. Read the professional literature. Use the library, interlibrary loan, the internet,

     and any other available resources to find that literature.

16. Realize that consistency and dependability are more to be desired than

     Virtuosity, and are more reapected in a professional setting

17. Know that “basics will get you a job.”

18. Understand and practice the axiom that “discipline will carry you when

     motivation fails.”

19. Understand that there is no career waiting for you. You are in the process

of preparing your career now.

     20. More practice

 

Common Pitfalls

  1. Apathy.
  2. Poor planning.
  3. Improper preparation
  4. Listening the wrong way, or to the wrong people or performances.
  5. Taking advice from the wrong people.
  6. Lack of effective practice.
  7. Being late or un-prepared.
  8. Not asking questions.
  9. Asking the wrong questions.
  10. Lack of resourcefulness or imagination.
  11. Unwillingness or inability to discipline yourself to do the right thing
  12. Laziness
  13.  Lack of Creativity
  14. Lack of attention in anticipating potential problems. We learn faster by avoiding mistakes than by making them.
  15. Lack of self discipline

 

 

 

Details Spring 2014 MUSC 4953  201  Special Topics    Fain Hall C117A

MUSC 4953 Special Topics in Music:

Strategies for Practice, Performance and Wellness

 

Course Number:         MUSC 4953 (201) Special Topics in Music

Location:                    FA C117 A

Class Time:                TBA

Instructor:                  Dr. Tim Justus                          FA C117F

                                    397-4502                                 timothy.justus@mwsu.edu

Course Description:

MUSC 3632 Special Topics in Music: Strategies for Practice, Performance and Wellness, is a pre-professional course for the aspiring musician incorporating and implementing strategies for practice discipline, memorization, performance anxiety, stage deportment, pedagogy, program preparation, wellness and other topics. 

Course Objectives:

Completion of the course will result in the development of new ideas and techniques for professional development as a performer and teacher in music.

 

Textbook:

Klickstein, Gerald. The Musician’s Way: A Guide to Practice, Performance and Wellness. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.)

 

Other Materials Needed:

The following list of materials and equipment is needed as part of the professional equipment of all performing musicians and what is generally needed for applied study.

  • Metronome
  • Electronic Tuner
  • Folding Music Stand (optional)
  • Instrument Stand (optional)
  • Three Ring Binder for keeping records and notes
  • Repertoire
  • Recording device (optional)

Course Evaluation:

            Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of reading and discussion, analysis, listening, essay submissions, self-recordings, score analysis and research, and performance.  

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

 

25%     Prepared reading, writing and discussion/listening assignments

Written question/opinion essays and identification of listening for repertoire examples, and critical essays on recital attendance performances

 

25%     Performances

Two (2) required performances, one done for the class near the middle of the semester, during class period and the other scheduled for MUSC 1000 Recital Attendance. (This performance may count for your required recital performance or not, at your discretion.) The MUSC 1000 performance will be evaluated by the class.

 

            25%     Score analysis/research

Selected pieces of repertoire will be analyzed, translated, summarized, and submitted to the class for evaluation.  

 

25%     Self-recording

Self-recording will be done at intervals during the semester, viewed and objectively criticized by the individual and the class.

 

Student Honor Creed:

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities, and the discussion with other class member will lead to increased knowledge of self and your performance potential.. Irregular attendance will result in loss of required activities and submissions. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr

 

 

Details Spring 2014 MUSC 2603  201  Theory III    Fain Hall C117A

MUSC 1613 Music Theory III

Spring 2014

 

Course Number:             MUSC 1613 Music Theory II

Section Number:           101

Location:                        FA C117 A

Class Time:                    10:00-10:50 AM

Instructor:                     Dr. Tim Justus                           397-4502

                                       timothy.justus@mwsu.edu          FA C117F

Course Description:

MUSC 2603, Music Theory III is a continuation of Music Theory II, and constitutes a study of the fundamentals of pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony and form in the context of the tonal music of the common practice period of the 18th and 19th centuries. Activities include practice in writing this style, and analysis of selected pieces. In combination with Sight Singing and Ear Training, this course forms the essential foundation for continued study of music at all levels.

Course Objectives:

Continued understanding of the structure of the music of the 18th and 19th century as related to melody, chord progression, and voice leading, and practice in writing short exercises in the style.

 

Textbook:

Jones, Thaddeus. Music Theory. Harper-Collins.

 

Other Materials Needed:

Manuscript paper template will be provided, soft lead pencils, or mechanical pencil, ruler, and other music manuscript preparation materials, 3-ring binder for handout and supplemental material. (All work will be done in pencil. Specific assignments may be accomplished on Finale®.) 

 

Course Evaluation:

          Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of lecture, analysis, in-class performance and exercises, assigned textbook reading assignments, out of class work, handouts, discussion and computer assisted learning and composition.

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

33%   Class work/class participation

Classwork assignments will be done in and out of class, usually graded in class and submitted.

 

33%   Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be made up.

 

33%   Exams

Exams will be given over announced topics and graded on a 100 point scale. At least one week notice will be given prior to exams. Missing an exam day is highly discouraged. Make up exams are given at the convenience of the instructor. All exams will be taken in pencil. The final exam will not be weighted any heavier than other exams, but will however be cumulative, due to the nature of the course content. The final exam will be given during the final exam period. The final exam may not be made up, no exceptions. Travel or flight plans, work, concerts, lessons etc., are not valid excuses.

 

Sequence for course work:

Because the course content is delivered based on the learning pace of the class it is not possible to determine a specific day that a topic will be covered or an exam given. The general sequence will be:

  1. Background text reading, presentation of topic material and practice classwork
  2. Additional practice classwork if needed
  3. Quiz
  4. Exam

Student Honor Creed:

 

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of learning the material. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 

Absences have consequences.

·        Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.

·        In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

·        Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.

·        Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.

·        Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.

 

Music Theory Rubric

 

 

Very Good
91-100 pts

Good
 81-90 pts

Fair
70-80 pts

Poor
61-70

 

 

Excellent

 

Good

 

Fair

 

Poor

 

 

 

Music Notation/

Manuscript

Music manuscript is very neat and all required elements are included: Clef Sign, Time and Key Signature correct.  All notes are written neatly using proper barline placement.

Music manuscript is neat. Two or less of the required elements are missing from the musical score.

Most notes are written clearly using the proper barline placement.

Music manuscript is legible. Three to four of the required elements are missing from the musical score.

Notes are written clearly, but barline placement is often incorrect

Music manuscript is illegible and many of the required musical score elements are missing. Notes are written in a sloppy and illegible manner

Poor

 

Meter and Rhythm

Excellent

All measures have the correct beats and a variety of rhythms are used.

Good

85% of measures have the correct beats and a variety of rhythms are used.

Fair

70% of the measures have the correct of beats.

Poor

Under half of the measure have the correct beats. Composition needs to be edited and resubmitted.

 

 

Harmony

Excellent

Triads/chords correctly spelled with proper doubling, spacing, proper inversions, correct figured bass notation

Good

Triads and other chords correctly spelled at least 90% with correct doublings, spacing, inversions and figured bass.

Fair

Triads and other chords correctly spelled at least 80% with correct doublings, spacing, inversions and figured bass. .

Poor 

Triads and other chords incorrectly spelled at least 30% with correct doublings, spacing, inversions and figured bass.

 

 

Overall Impression

Excellent

The composition was in the style, clean/easy to read, and included all required elements.

Good

The composition was somewhat in the style and legible. Most of the required elements were included.

Fair

The composition was very basic and somewhat in the style to read. At least half of the required elements were included.

Poor 

The composition was not complete, and very difficult to read. Under half of the required elements were included.

 

 

Roman Numeral Chord Progression

Excellent

Assignment contains 100% accurate figured bass notation and proper chord progression/movement according to instruction and the common practice style

Good

Assignment contains 90% accurate figured bass notation and proper chord progression/movement according to instruction and the common practice style

Fair

Assignment contains 80% accurate figured bass notation and proper chord progression/movement according to instruction and the common practice style 

Poor 

Assignment contains 50% accurate figured bass notation or less and 50% proper chord progression/ movement according to instruction and the common practice style

 

 

               

 

Details Spring 2014 MUSC 1613  201  Theory II    Fain Hall C117A

MUSC 1613 Music Theory II

Spring 2014

 

Course Number:             MUSC 1613 Music Theory II

Section Number:           101

Location:                        FA C117 A

Class Time:                    10:00-10:50 AM

Instructor:                     Dr. Tim Justus                           397-4502

                                       timothy.justus@mwsu.edu          FA C117F

Course Description:

MUSC 1613, Music Theory II is a continuation of Music Theory I, and constitutes a study of the fundamentals of pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony and form in the context of the tonal music of the common practice period of the 18th and 19th centuries. Activities include practice in writing this style, and analysis of selected pieces. In combination with Sight Singing and Ear Training, this course forms the essential foundation for continued study of music at all levels.

Course Objectives:

Continued understanding of the structure of the music of the 18th and 19th century as related to melody, chord progression, and voice leading, and practice in writing short exercises in the style.

 

Textbook:

Jones, Thaddeus. Music Theory. Harper-Collins.

 

Other Materials Needed:

Manuscript paper template will be provided, soft lead pencils, or mechanical pencil, ruler, and other music manuscript preparation materials, 3-ring binder for handout and supplemental material. (All work will be done in pencil. Specific assignments may be accomplished on Finale®.) 

 

Course Evaluation:

          Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of lecture, analysis, in-class performance and exercises, assigned textbook reading assignments, out of class work, handouts, discussion and computer assisted learning and composition.

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

33%   Class work/class participation

Classwork assignments will be done in and out of class, usually graded in class and submitted.

 

33%   Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be made up.

 

33%   Exams

Exams will be given over announced topics and graded on a 100 point scale. At least one week notice will be given prior to exams. Missing an exam day is highly discouraged. Make up exams are given at the convenience of the instructor. All exams will be taken in pencil. The final exam will not be weighted any heavier than other exams, but will however be cumulative, due to the nature of the course content. The final exam will be given during the final exam period. The final exam may not be made up, no exceptions. Travel or flight plans, work, concerts, lessons etc., are not valid excuses.

 

Sequence for course work:

Because the course content is delivered based on the learning pace of the class it is not possible to determine a specific day that a topic will be covered or an exam given. The general sequence will be:

  1. Background text reading, presentation of topic material and practice classwork
  2. Additional practice classwork if needed
  3. Quiz
  4. Exam

Student Honor Creed:

 

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of learning the material. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 

Absences have consequences.

·        Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.

·        In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

·        Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.

·        Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.

·        Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.

 

Music Theory Rubric

 

 

Very Good
91-100 pts

Good
 81-90 pts

Fair
70-80 pts

Poor
61-70

 

 

Excellent

 

Good

 

Fair

 

Poor

 

 

 

Music Notation/

Manuscript

Music manuscript is very neat and all required elements are included: Clef Sign, Time and Key Signature correct.  All notes are written neatly using proper barline placement.

Music manuscript is neat. Two or less of the required elements are missing from the musical score.

Most notes are written clearly using the proper barline placement.

Music manuscript is legible. Three to four of the required elements are missing from the musical score.

Notes are written clearly, but barline placement is often incorrect

Music manuscript is illegible and many of the required musical score elements are missing. Notes are written in a sloppy and illegible manner

Poor

 

Meter and Rhythm

Excellent

All measures have the correct beats and a variety of rhythms are used.

Good

85% of measures have the correct beats and a variety of rhythms are used.

Fair

70% of the measures have the correct of beats.

Poor

Under half of the measure have the correct beats. Composition needs to be edited and resubmitted.

 

 

Harmony

Excellent

Triads/chords correctly spelled with proper doubling, spacing, proper inversions, correct figured bass notation

Good

Triads and other chords correctly spelled at least 90% with correct doublings, spacing, inversions and figured bass.

Fair

Triads and other chords correctly spelled at least 80% with correct doublings, spacing, inversions and figured bass. .

Poor 

Triads and other chords incorrectly spelled at least 30% with correct doublings, spacing, inversions and figured bass.

 

 

Overall Impression

Excellent

The composition was in the style, clean/easy to read, and included all required elements.

Good

The composition was somewhat in the style and legible. Most of the required elements were included.

Fair

The composition was very basic and somewhat in the style to read. At least half of the required elements were included.

Poor 

The composition was not complete, and very difficult to read. Under half of the required elements were included.

 

 

Roman Numeral Chord Progression

Excellent

Assignment contains 100% accurate figured bass notation and proper chord progression/movement according to instruction and the common practice style

Good

Assignment contains 90% accurate figured bass notation and proper chord progression/movement according to instruction and the common practice style

Fair

Assignment contains 80% accurate figured bass notation and proper chord progression/movement according to instruction and the common practice style 

Poor 

Assignment contains 50% accurate figured bass notation or less and 50% proper chord progression/ movement according to instruction and the common practice style

 

 

               

 

Details Spring 2014 3662  201  Ochestration and Arranging    Fain Hall C117A

MUSC 3662 Orchestration

 

Course Number:     MUSC 3662 Orchestration

Section Number:    201

Location:               FA C117 A

Class Time: 10:00-10:50 AM

Instructor:             Dr. Tim Justus                             FA C117F

                             397-4502                          timothy.justus@mwsu.edu

Course Description:

MUSC 3662 is the study of techniques of scoring and part editing and extraction for orchestra, and instrumental and vocal ensembles, with attention given to arranging for school ensembles.

Course Objectives:

Upon completing this course, you should know the fundamentals of orchestration for all families of instruments and their ranges and transpositions, and have developed skills resulting in the ability to orchestrate for instrumental, vocal and mixed ensembles, especially for school ensembles, and extract readable parts for performance, and to produce in a short time, an arrangement for a specified ensemble.

 

Textbook and Materials Required:

Three Ring Binder for handout materials

 

Highly Recommended: Essential Dictionary of Orchestration by Dave Black and Tom Gerou - ($8.99) ISBN  10 0739000217/ISBN 13 9780739000212

 

Class Activities:

  • Listening
  • Score examination
  • Score Preparation
  • Part Extraction

Course Evaluation:

Evaluation of student will be through short orchestration assignments, score preparation, project completion, and examination.

 

33% Three Examinations will average to 33% of the final grade

33% Three Orchestration Projects will average to 33% of the grade

33% Score Preparation, Part Extraction will average to 33%of the grade

 

Exams questions will consist of short answer and identification, transposition, short scoring examples, terms including foreign language terms, chord progression, etc.

 

 

 

Projects will consist of three short orchestration projects: (Details for the project will be given at the time of assignment)

  1. Scoring a folk song setting for small band
  2. Scoring a popular song for small jazz ensemble OR scoring a popular song for vocal ensemble and rhythm section, for vocal majors
  3. Transcription of a piano work for small orchestra or band

Grading Scale

90-100-A

  80-89-B

  70-79-C

  60-69-D

   0 -69-F

 

The following rubric will be used for evaluating scores:

 

 

Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Unsatisfactory

 

100

90

80

70

60

Score

“Publication” ready,  score order,  clean, readable, centered on the page, all dynamics, articulations, phrase markings, etc. complete and ready for performance

 

Nearly publication ready, clean and readable, with all dynamics, articulations, phrase markings, etc. complete and ready for performance

Useable but not publication ready, incomplete or inaccurate with regard to dynamics, articulations, phrase markings, etc., not ready for performance

Incomplete or inability to extract playable parts

Not useable,  incomplete, inability to extract parts

Parts

Publication ready, edited, for performance, without errors

 

Very nearly publication ready, edited and capable of presenting a performance with minimal performer editing for accurate performance

Not publication ready, largely unedited and requiring substantial editing by performers for accurate performance

Incomplete or requiring extensive  editing

Incomplete of unable to be extracted due to the inaccuracy of the score

Notation

Software manipulation to a high (professional) level, or handwritten score of extremely high quality

Software manipulation to a high amateur level or handwritten score of readable quality

Software manipulation at a novice level or handwritten score of medium quality

Software manipulation below novice level or handwritten score requiring revision

Inability to sufficiently manipulate software to create score, or handwritten score not readable or incomplete 

Accuracy

All pitches and rhythms correct and all chord changes correct and properly notated

All pitches and rhythms correct and all chord changes correct and properly notated

90% pitches  rhythms and chord changes correct and properly notated

80% pitches, rhythms and chord changes correct and properly notated

70% or fewer pitches, rhythms and chord changes correct and properly notated

Creativity

Arrangement shows innovation and imagination beyond  note for note transcription

Arrangement shows some innovation and creativity, and not merely transferred from the source score

Arrangement shows some creativity beyond transferred from source material

Arrangement shows little creativity beyond transference from source material

Arrangement demonstrates no creativity from source material

 

 

 

Student Honor Creed:

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 

Absences have consequences.

·        Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.

·        In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

·        Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.

·        Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.

·        Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Suggested Reading:

Suggested books on Orchestration

Adler, Samuel. Orchestration.

Blatter, Alfred. Instrumentation/Orchestration.

Rogers, Bernard. The Art of Orchestration.

 

Historical - and still good - books on Orchestration

Berlioz, Hector. Treatise of Instrumentation.

Rimsky-Korsakov, Nikolai. Principles of Orchestration.

 

Suggested books on Notation

Donato. Preparing Music Manuscript.

Vinci. Fundamentals of Traditional Musical Notation.

Williams. Music Preparation: A Guide to Music Copying.

 

 

Scores

 


Violin

Bach Chaconne
Bartok Sonata
Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto
Paganini Caprices
Debussy Sonata in G min

 

Viola

Berio Folk Songs
Debussy Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp
Yuasa Revealed Time

 

Cello

Bach Cello Suites
Dvorak Cello Concerto
Lutoslawski Cello Concerto
Debussy Sonata in D min

 

String Quartet

Beethoven No. 131
Debussy
Ravel
Bartok No. 4

 

Bass

Schubert Death and the Maiden
Stravinsky Pulcinella

 

 

 

String Orchestra

Takemitsu Requiem; Dorian Horizon
Tchaikovsky Serenade for Strings

 

Flute

Varese Density 21.5
Boulez Sonatine
Debussy Prelude a l'apres-midi d'un faune
Debussy Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp

 

Oboe

Stravinsky Firebird

 

English Horn

Dvorak New World Symphony
Rodrigo Concierto de Aranjuez

Clarinet

Copland Clarinet Concerto
Mahler Symphony No. 1

 

 

Bass Clarinet

Stravinsky Rite of Spring
Dobrian Parable

 

Bassoon

Stravinsky Rite of Spring; Petrushka (Contra)

 

 

Woodwind Quintet

Ligeti Ten Pieces ML128.C4 P5

 

Piano

Bartok Mikrokosmos
Bartok Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion
Stravinsky Petrushka
Ravel Piano Concerto

 

Harp

Tchaikovsky Nutcracker Suite
Debussy Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp

 

Celesta

Tchaikovsky Nutcracker Suite
Bartok Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta

 

Vibraphone

Boulez Le marteau sans maitre
 

 

Marimba

Berio Circles
Dobrian Now and Then

 

Timpani

Carter Etudes
Beethoven Symphony No. 6 & 9
Berlioz Symphonie fantastique

 

Bass Drum

Stravinsky Rite of Spring

 

Percussion

Varese Ionisation
Berio Circles
 

Guitar

Rodrigo Concierto de Aranjuez
Sor Variations on a Theme by Mozart
Villa-Lobos Etudes
Tarrega Capricho Arabe

 

Jazz Ensemble

Ellington Ko-ko

 

Texture

Debussy La Mer
Ravel Rapsodie espagnole
Ligeti Atmospheres
Ligeti Lontano
Xenakis Pithoprakta


 

Recordings

 


Violin

Bach Chaconne
Bartok Sonata
Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto
Paganini Caprices
Debussy Sonata in G min

 

 

 

Viola

Berio Folk Songs
Debussy Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp
Yuasa Revealed Time

 

'Cello

Bach Cello Suites
Dvorak Cello Concerto
Lutoslawski Cello Concerto
Debussy Sonata in D min

 

String Quartet

Beethoven No. 131
Debussy
Ravel
Bartok No. 4

 

Bass

Schubert Death and the Maiden
Stravinsky Pulcinella

 

String Orchestra

Takemitsu Requiem; Dorian Horizon
Tchaikovsky Serenade for Strings

 

 

Flute

Boulez Sonatine
Debussy Prelude a l'apres-midi d'un faune
Debussy Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp

 

Oboe

Stravinsky Firebird

 

English Horn

Dvorak New World Symphony
Rodrigo Concierto de Aranjuez

 

Clarinet

Copland Clarinet Concerto
Mahler Symphony No. 1

 

Bass Clarinet

Stravinsky Rite of Spring
 

Bassoon

Stravinsky Rite of Spring; Petrushka (Contra)

 

Woodwind Quintet

Ligeti Ten Pieces

 

Piano

Bartok Mikrokosmos
Stravinsky Petrushka
Ravel Piano Concerto

 

Harp

Tchaikovsky Nutcracker Suite
Debussy Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp

 

Celesta

Tchaikovsky Nutcracker Suite
Bartok Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta

 

Vibraphone

Boulez Le marteau sans maitre
 

Marimba

Berio Circles
 

Timpani

Carter Etudes
Beethoven Symphony No. 6 & 9
Berlioz Symphonie fantastique

 

Bass Drum

Stravinsky Rite of Spring

 

Percussion

Varese Ionisation
Berio Circles
 

Guitar

Rodrigo Concierto de Aranjuez
Sor Variations on a Theme by Mozart
Villa-Lobos Etudes
Tarrega Capricho Arabe

 

Jazz Ensemble

Ellington Ko-ko

Texture

Debussy La Mer
Ravel Rapsodie espagnole
Ligeti Atmospheres
 


 

Details Fall 2013 MUSC 4963  101  Independent Study Ear Training/Sight Singing    Fain Fine Arts Center C117P

MUSC 4963 Independent Study in Music

MUSC 1601 Elementary Sight Singing and Ear Training II

 

Course Number:          MUSC 1601 Elementary Sight Singing and Ear Training II

Section Number:         101

Location:                     FA C117 A

Class Time:                  8:30-9:20 AM TTR

 

Instructor:                   Dr. Tim Justus                                    FA C117F

                                    397-4502                                             timothy.justus@mwsu.edu

Course Description:

MUSC 1601Elementay Ear Training and Sight Singing II is a continuation of Elementary Sight Singing/Ear Training I and continues to develop skills in rhythm, pitch and the execution of melodies in treble and bass clef.

Course Objectives:

Development of skills in reading and writing pitch and rhythm

 

Textbook:

No text book required

 

Other Material: 

Music manuscript paper, pencil, eraser

 

Course Evaluation:

           

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- D

 

30%     Class work and homework, class participation

Techniques and concepts will be learned in class, accompanied by a degree of practice. Significant practice is expected out of class. With the exception of individual taking, most material will be covered, performed and graded in class. Absence from class results in missed class assignment grades. 

 

30%     Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be made up.

 

30%     Exams

ET/SS s will be timed. During the course of a , there will be multiple items to execute in a given time frame. Class participants will have only the allotted time to complete all the items. Make up exams will be given only with a doctor's excuse or documented family emergency. Advance notice is required if you plan to miss an exam and take a makeup.

 

Study/Practice Groups-Partners

Students are encouraged to find a study/practice partner or group in the class. Practicing with a partner or in a group reinforces techniques and makes a variety of activities possible, and partners may assist each other when the need arises.

 

            Class Activities

§  Count and Clap Rhythm

§  Conduct and Sing Rhythm

§  Sight-singing Melodies   

§  Rhythmic and Melodic Dictation

§  Writing Accompaniment/Melody Harmonization

Sight Singing Rubric

Criteria for

Singing

3 Points

(Failing)

4 Points

(Poor)

6 Points

(Fair)

7 Points

(Good)

10 Points

(Excellent)

Pitch/Solfege

70%

Numerous incorrect

pitches and solfege

More than half of

pitches or syllables

 incorrect 

Several (4 or more)

incorrect pitches

or syllables

No more than

two incorrect

pitches or syllables

No incorrect pitches

or syllables

Rhythm/Tempo

20%

Numerous incorrect

rhythms/Tempo not

consistent with marking

or steady

Half or more

incorrect rhythms/

Tempo not consistent

with marking or steady

Several (4 or more)

Incorrect rhythms/

Tempo somewhat

 inconsistent with marking

No more than

 two incorrect

 rhythms/Tempo

 steady and consistent with marking

No incorrect rhythms/Steady tempos

consistent with markings

Continuity/

Expression

10%

Numerous “start-overs”

Three or more

 “start=overs”

Two or more

 “start-overs”

No more than one

“start-over”

No “start-overs”

 

·         Pitches should be sung in tune and with correct solfege syllables.

·         Rhythms and rhythmic patterns should be sung accurately and in steady tempo, observing the spirit of the marking or tempo indication. Rubato, accelerando, ritardando, etc. should be observed.

·         Examples should be sung with continuity, with no “start-overs*” and observing dynamic markings, articulations (accents, staccato, etc.), proper tempo

*(Start-overs are a breakdown or delay in the ability to sing to the degree that no recovery of pitch or rhythm is possible without starting over.)

 

Student Honor Creed:

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

Absences will have consequences.

 

·         Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.

·         In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

·         Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.

·         Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.

·         Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.

 

Details Fall 2013 MUSC 3632  101  Analysis of Musical Form    Fain Fine Arts Center C117C

MUSC 3632 Analysis of Musical Form

 

Course Number:        MUSC 3632 Analysis of Musical Form

Section Number:       101

Location:                    FA C117 A

Class Time:                10:00-10:50 AM

Instructor:                  Dr. Tim Justus                                    FA C117F

                                    397-4502                                             timothy.justus@mwsu.edu

Course Description:

MUSC 3632 is the study and analysis of musical structure beginning with phrase and period, including binary, ternary, rondo, and sonata forms. Also included will be a study of contrapuntal forms including fugue, and an introductinto contemporary formal processes.

Course Objectives:

Completion of the course will result in an understanding of the structure of the musical formal processes used during the common practice period of music.

 

Textbook:

Santa, Matthew. Hearing Form: Musical Analysis With and Without the Score. Routledge.

 

Course Evaluation:

            Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of class work in  analysis, assigned reading/listening, exams, quizzes and analysis assignments.

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

 

25%     Class work/ class participation

Discussion of reading assignments will be done in class in preparation for analysis assignments.

 

25%     Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be made up.

 

25%     Exams

Exams maybe given over significant topics after sufficient class explanation and practice. At least a week notice will be given prior to exams. Missing an exam is highly discouraged. Make up exams are given at the convenience of the instructor. Exam types will also include special short composition projects designed to illustrate and provide practice in specific concepts. These “take home” exams will be  graded as regular exams. All exams will be taken in pencil. The final exam will not be weighted any heavier than other exams, but will however be cumulative, due to the nature of the course content. The final exam will be given during the final exam period. The final exam  may not be made up. There will be no exceptions. Travel or flight plans, work, concerts, lessons etc., are not valid excuses.

 

25%     Analysis Project Assignments

                         

 

Student Honor Creed:

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 

Absences will have consequences.

·         Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.

·         In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

·         Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.

·         Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.

·         Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr

Details Fall 2013 MUSC 2613  101  Music Theory IV    Fain Fine Arts Center C117A

MUSC 3632 Analysis of Musical Form

 

Course Number:        MUSC 3632 Analysis of Musical Form

Section Number:       101

Location:                    FA C117 A

Class Time:                10:00-10:50 AM

Instructor:                  Dr. Tim Justus                                    FA C117F

                                    397-4502                                             timothy.justus@mwsu.edu

Course Description:

MUSC 3632 is the study and analysis of musical structure beginning with phrase and period, including binary, ternary, rondo, and sonata forms. Also included will be a study of contrapuntal forms including fugue, and an introductinto contemporary formal processes.

Course Objectives:

Completion of the course will result in an understanding of the structure of the musical formal processes used during the common practice period of music.

 

Textbook:

Santa, Matthew. Hearing Form: Musical Analysis With and Without the Score. Routledge.

 

Course Evaluation:

            Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of class work in  analysis, assigned reading/listening, exams, quizzes and analysis assignments.

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

 

25%     Class work/ class participation

Discussion of reading assignments will be done in class in preparation for analysis assignments.

 

25%     Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be made up.

 

25%     Exams

Exams maybe given over significant topics after sufficient class explanation and practice. At least a week notice will be given prior to exams. Missing an exam is highly discouraged. Make up exams are given at the convenience of the instructor. Exam types will also include special short composition projects designed to illustrate and provide practice in specific concepts. These “take home” exams will be  graded as regular exams. All exams will be taken in pencil. The final exam will not be weighted any heavier than other exams, but will however be cumulative, due to the nature of the course content. The final exam will be given during the final exam period. The final exam  may not be made up. There will be no exceptions. Travel or flight plans, work, concerts, lessons etc., are not valid excuses.

 

25%     Analysis Project Assignments

                         

 

Student Honor Creed:

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 

Absences will have consequences.

·         Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.

·         In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

·         Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.

·         Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.

·         Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr

Details Fall 2012 MUSC 4963  101  Independent Study in Music    Fain Fine Arts Center C117F

MUSC 4963 Independent Study

Special Topics in Music Theory

 

Course Number:        MUSC 4963 Independent Study in Music

Section Number:       101

Location:                    FA C117 A

Class Time:                TBA

Instructor:                  Dr. Tim Justus                                    FA C117F

                                    397-4502                                             timothy.justus@mwsu.edu

Course Description:

MUSC 3632 Special Topics in Music Theory is a survey of aspects of music theory from the late Classical Period through the late Romantic Period including chromaticism, remote modulation and expanded tonicization, and analysis of specific works using these theoretical technics.

Course Objectives:

Completion of the course will result an increased understanding of the techniques of chromaticism and modulation in use in the late 19th century.

 Textbook:

No textbook required. Text and instructional material will be provided by instructor.

Course Evaluation:

            Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of lecture, analysis, assigned reading/listening, class work, discussion, exams, quizzes and analysis assignments..

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

 

25%     Class work/ class participation

Discussion of reading assignments will be done in class in preparation for analysis assignments.

 

25%     Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be made up.

 

25%     Exams

Exams maybe given over significant topics after sufficient class explanation and practice. At least a week notice will be given prior to exams. Missing an exam is highly discouraged. Make up exams are given at the convenience of the instructor. Exam types will also include special short composition projects designed to illustrate and provide practice in specific concepts. These “take home” exams will be  graded as regular exams. All exams will be taken in pencil. The final exam will not be weighted any heavier than other exams, but will however be cumulative, due to the nature of the course content. The final exam will be given during the final exam period. The final exam  may not be made up. There will be no exceptions. Travel or flight plans, work, concerts, lessons etc., are not valid excuses.

 

25%     Analysis Project Assignments

Student Honor Creed:

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 Absences will have consequences.

  • Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.
  • In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

Excused absences include:

  • Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.
  • Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.
  • Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr

 

Details Fall 2012 MUSC 3643  101  Composition    Fain Fine Arts Center C117A

MUSC 3643 Composition

 

Course Number:             MUSC 3643 Composition

Section Number:           101

Location:                        FA C117 A

Class Time:                    10:00-10:50 AM TR

Instructor:                     Dr. Tim Justus                            397-4502

                                       timothy.justus@mwsu.edu           FA C117F

                                      

Course Description:

MUSC 3643, Composition is an introductory class in composition with assignments including the creation of musical pieces in various forms and genres drawn from those generally found in Western classical music. The course may also be modeled to include other topics for students with previous experience in composition or advanced theory.

Course Objectives:

The objectives of the course will be to create pieces in various forms and styles in the traditions of Western classical art music traditions, with appropriate orchestrations and sound files.

 

Textbook:

No textbook required.

 

Other Materials Needed:

Manuscript paper, soft lead pencils, ruler or straight edge, and other music manuscript preparation materials. (All work will be done in pencil. Specific assignments may be accomplished on Finale®.) 

 

Course Evaluation:

          Instruction:

Assignments will be made according to forms and orchestrations fo pieces selected.  

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

 

 

          Projects

There will be five (5) short composition projects graded on a 100 point scale.

 

Student Honor Creed:

 

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 

Absences will have consequences.

  • Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.
  • In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.
  •  

 

Excused absences include:

  • Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.
  • Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.
  • Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Details Fall 2012 MUSC 3632   101  Analysis of Musical Form    Fain Fine Arts Center C117C

Course Number:          MUSC 3632 Analysis of Musical Form

Section Number:         101

Location:                     FA C117 A

Class Time:                  10:00-10:50 AM

Instructor:                   Dr. Tim Justus                                    FA C117F

                                    397-4502                                             timothy.justus@mwsu.edu

Course Description:

MUSC 3632 is the study and analysis of musical structure beginning with phrase and period, including binary, ternary, rondo, and sonata forms. Also included will be a study of contrapuntal forms including fugue, and an introduction to contemporary formal processes.

Course Objectives:

Completion of the course will result in an understanding of the structure of the musical formal processes used during the common practice period of music.

 

Textbook:

No textbook required.

 

Course Evaluation:

            Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of lecture/discussion, analysis, reading/listening assignments and analysis projects

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

 

25%     Class work and class participation

Reading and study assignments will be discussed in class,  

 

75%     Analysis Project Assignments

Analysis projects will be graded on a 100 point scale that will include punctuality, accuracy, inclusion of all elements in the analysis outline.

 

Student Honor Creed:

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 

Absences have consequences.

  • Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.
  • In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

  • Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.
  • Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.
  • Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Schedule

 

Date

Reading Assignment

Analysis Assignment

Aug 27

Overview of Musical Form

 

Aug 29

Analysis Outline

 

Sep 5

Single Part/Through Composed Forms

 

Sep 10

Binary Forms

 

Sep 12

No Class Meeting

 

Sep 17

Ternary Forms

 

Sep 19

Baroque Suite

First Analysis Due/Part Forms

Sep 24

Baroque Suite

 

Sep 26

Ritornello and Concerto Grosso

Baroque Suite Analysis Due

Oct 1

Ritornello and Concerto Grosso

 

Oct 3

Baroque Sonata

Concerto Grosso Analysis Due

Oct 8

Baroque Sonata

 

Oct 10

Rondo Forms

Baroque Sonata Analysis Due

Oct 15

Rondo Forms, cont.

 

Oct 17

Theme and Variations, Ostinato

Rondo Analysis Due

Oct 22

 Theme and Variations, Sectional

 

Oct 24

Contrapuntal Forms

Theme and Variations Analysis Due

Oct 29

Contrapuntal Forms, cont.

 

Oct 31

Sonatina/Sonata Form

Contrapuntal Forms Analysis Due

Nov 5

Sonata Form, cont.

 

Nov 7

Sonata Form, cont.

 

Nov 12

Sonata Cycle

Sonata Analysis Due

Nov 14

Sonata Cycle/Concerto

 

Nov 19

Song/Aria Forms/Strophic Form

 

Nov 26

Choral Genres and Forms

Second Sonata Analysis Due

Nov 28

Choral Genres and Forms

 

Dec 3

Recitatives and Opera Scene

 

Dec 5

20th Century Forms 20th Century Forms.

Vocal Forms Project Due

Dec 10

No Class Meeting

 

Dec 12

No Class Meeting

Final Analysis Project Due

 

 

Details Fall 2012 MUSC 1613   101  Music Theory II    Fain Fine Arts Center C117A

Course Number:             MUSC 1613 Music Theory II

Section Number:           101

Location:                        FA C117 A

Class Time:                    10:00-10:50 AM

Instructor:                     Dr. Tim Justus                            397-4502

                                       timothy.justus@mwsu.edu           FA C117F

                                      

Course Description:

MUSC 1613, Music Theory II is a continuation of Music Theory I, and constitutes a study of the fundamentals of pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony and form in the context of the tonal music of the common practice period of the 18th and 19th centuries. Activities include practice in writing this style, and analysis of selected pieces. In combination with Sight Singing and Ear Training, this course forms the essential foundation for continued study of music at all levels.

Course Objectives:

Continued understanding of the structure of the music of the 18th and 19th century as related to melody, chord progression, and voice leading, and practice in writing short exercises in the style.

 

Textbook:

Kostka, Stefan and Dorothy Payne. Tonal Harmony: With an Introduction to Twentieth Century Music, 6th Edition. McGraw Hill).

 

Other Materials Needed:

Manuscript paper, soft lead pencils, ruler or straight edge, and other music manuscript preparation materials. (All work will be done in pencil. Specific assignments may be accomplished on Finale®.) 

 

Course Evaluation:

          Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of lecture, analysis, in-class performance and exercise, assigned textbook reading assignments, out of class work, handouts, discussion and computer assisted learning and composition.

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

30%   Class work, homework, class participation

There will be fifteen (15) homework assignments. Each will be graded on a 100 point scale.

 

30%   Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be made up.

 

30%   Exams

There will be five (5) exams given over significant topics graded on a 100 point scale. At least a week notice will be given prior to exams. Missing an exam is highly discouraged. Make up exams are given at the convenience of the instructor. All exams will be taken in pencil. The final exam will not be weighted any heavier than other exams, but will however be cumulative, due to the nature of the course content. The final exam will be given during the final exam period. The final exam may not be made up. There will be no exceptions. Travel or flight plans, work, concerts, lessons etc., are not valid excuses.

 

10%   Projects

There will be five (5) short composition projects graded on a 100 point scale.

 

Student Honor Creed:

 

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 

Absences will have consequences.

·         Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.

·         In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

·         Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.

·         Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.

·         Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Details Fall 2012 MUSC 1613   101  Music Theory IV    Fain Fine Arts Center C117A

Course Number:             MUSC 2613 Music Theory IV

Section Number:           101

Location:                        FA C117 A

Class Time:                    9:00-9:50 AM

Instructor:                     Dr. Tim Justus                            397-4502

                                       timothy.justus@mwsu.edu           FA C117F

                                      

Course Description:

MUSC 1613, Music Theory IV is a continuation of Music Theory III, and constitutes a study of the fundamentals of pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony and form in the context of the expanded tonal music of the late 19th centuries, and rhythmic, harmonic and melodic elements of the 20th century. Activities include practice in writing this style, and analysis of selected pieces.

Course Objectives:

Continued understanding of the structure of the music of the 19th century as related to melody, chord progression, and voice leading, and practice in writing short exercises in the style, and an introduction to the music of the 20th century, and rhythmic, harmonic and melodic techniques and resources.

 

Textbook:

Kostka, Stefan and Dorothy Payne. Tonal Harmony: With an Introduction to Twentieth Century Music, 6th Edition. McGraw Hill).

 

Other Materials Needed:

Manuscript paper, soft lead pencils, ruler or straight edge, and other music manuscript preparation materials. (All work will be done in pencil. Specific assignments may be accomplished on Finale®.) 

 

Course Evaluation:

          Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of lecture, analysis, in-class performance and exercise, assigned textbook reading assignments, out of class work, handouts, discussion and computer assisted learning and composition.

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

 

30%   Class work, homework, class participation

There will be fifteen (15) homework assignments. Each will be graded on a 100 point scale.

 

30%   Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be           made up.

 

30%   Exams

There will be five (5) exams given over significant topics graded on a 100 point scale. At least a week notice will be given prior to exams. Missing an exam is highly discouraged. Make up exams are given at the convenience of the instructor. All exams will be taken in pencil. The final exam will not be weighted any heavier than other exams, but will however be cumulative, due to the nature of the course content. The final exam will be given during the final exam period. The final exam may not be made up. There will be no exceptions. Travel or flight plans, work, concerts, lessons etc., are not valid excuses.

 

10%   Projects

There will be five (5) short composition projects graded on a 100 point scale.

 

Student Honor Creed:

 

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 

Absences will have consequences.

  • Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.
  • In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

  • Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.
  • Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.
  • Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.

Details Fall 2012 MUSC 1611  101   Elementary Sight Singing/Ear Training II    Fain Fine Arts Center C117A

Course Number:  MUSC 1611 Elementary Sight Singing and Ear Training II

Section Number:  101

Location:             FA C117 A

Class Time:          8:30-9:20 AM

Instructor:            Dr. Tim Justus                                    FA C117F

                            397-4502                                          timothy.justus@mwsu.edu

Course Description:

MUSC 1611Elementay Ear Training and Sight Singing II is a continuation of Sight Singing I, continuing with minor keys, intervals from the dominant triad, compound meters and other diatonic intervals.

Course Objectives:

Continued development of skills in reading pitch and rhythm

 

Textbook:

Robert W. Ottman. Music for Sight Singing.

 

Other Material:  

Additional material will be provided by the instructor.

 

Course Evaluation:

           

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

 

30%     Class work and homework, class participation

Techniques and concepts will be learned in class, accompanied by a degree of practice. Significant practice is expected out of class. With the exception of individual taking, most material will be covered, performed and graded in class. Absence from class results in missed class assignment grades. 

 

30%     Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be made up.

 

30%     Exams

ET/SS s will be timed. During the course of a , there will be multiple items to execute in a given time frame. You will have only the allotted time to complete all the items. Make up exams will be given only with a doctor's excuse or documented family emergency. Advance notice is required if you plan to miss an exam and take a makeup.

 

Study/Practice Groups-Partners

Students are encouraged to find a study/practice partner or group in the class. Practicing with a partner or in a group reinforces techniques and makes a variety of activities possible, and partners may assist each other when the need arises.

 

Student Honor Creed:

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

Absences will have consequences.

 

·         Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.

·         In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

 

Excused absences include:

·         Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.

·         Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.

·         Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.

 

Details Spring 2012 MUSC 3662  201  Orchestration    Instrumental Music Hall 104

MW 1:00 - 1:50PM

Details Spring 2012 MUSC 2603  201  Theory III    Fain Hall C117A

9:00 - 9:50 AM

Details Spring 2012 MUSC 1603  201  Theory I    Fain Hall C117A

10:00-10:50 AM

Details Spring 2012 1601  201  Elementary Ear Training and Sight Singing I    Fain Fine Arts Center C117A

8:30 AM - 9:20 AM TTR

Details Fall 2011 3632  101  Analysis of Music Form    Fain Fine Arts Center C117H 1:00-1:50 MW
Details Fall 2011 3061    Wichita Falls Chamber Orchestra    Fain Hall  7:00-9:00 PM M
Details Fall 2011 2613  101  Music Theory IV    Fain Fine Arts Center C117A 9:00-9:50 MWF
Details Fall 2011 1613  101  Music Theory II    Fain Fine Arts Center C117A 10:00-10:50 MWF
Details Fall 13 MUSC 1613  101  Music Theory II    Fain Fine Arts Center C117A

MUSC 1613 Music Theory II

Fall 2013

 

Course Number:             MUSC 1613 Music Theory II

Section Number:           101

Location:                        FA C117 A

Class Time:                    10:00-10:50 AM

Instructor:                     Dr. Tim Justus                            397-4502

                                       timothy.justus@mwsu.edu           FA C117F

                                      

Course Description:

MUSC 1613, Music Theory II is a continuation of Music Theory I, and constitutes a study of the fundamentals of pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony and form in the context of the tonal music of the common practice period of the 18th and 19th centuries. Activities include practice in writing this style, and analysis of selected pieces. In combination with Sight Singing and Ear Training, this course forms the essential foundation for continued study of music at all levels.

Course Objectives:

Continued understanding of the structure of the music of the 18th and 19th century as related to melody, chord progression, and voice leading, and practice in writing short exercises in the style.

 

Textbook:

Jones, Thaddeus. Music Theory. Harper-Collins.

 

Other Materials Needed:

Manuscript paper, soft lead pencils, ruler or straight edge, and other music manuscript preparation materials. (All work will be done in pencil. Specific assignments may be accomplished on Finale®.) 

 

Course Evaluation:

          Instruction:

Instruction will take place in the form of lecture, analysis, in-class performance and exercise, assigned textbook reading assignments, out of class work, handouts, discussion and computer assisted learning and composition.

 

Grading Scale

90-100-A

80-89-B

70-79-C

60-69-D

59- F

33%   Class work, homework, class participation

There will be fifteen (15) homework assignments. Each will be graded on a 100 point scale.

 

33%   Quizzes

Quizzes may be announced or unannounced. Quizzes may not be made up.

 

33%   Exams

There will be five (5) exams given over significant topics graded on a 100 point scale. At least a week notice will be given prior to exams. Missing an exam is highly discouraged. Make up exams are given at the convenience of the instructor. All exams will be taken in pencil. The final exam will not be weighted any heavier than other exams, but will however be cumulative, due to the nature of the course content. The final exam will be given during the final exam period. The final exam may not be made up. There will be no exceptions. Travel or flight plans, work, concerts, lessons etc., are not valid excuses.

 

Student Honor Creed:

 

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of the course. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed s, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class. 

 

Absences will have consequences.

·         Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a with an excuse.

·         In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

·         Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.

·         Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.

·         Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

 

 

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

Writing Proficiency Requirement:

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed English 1113 and English 1123 and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at http://academics.mwsu.edu/wpr, or call 397-4131.




Education Background

Institution Degree    Graduation Date
Northeast Louisiana University Bachelor of Music  
Louisiana State University Master of Music 1990-05-15 
Louisiana State University Doctor of Musical Arts 1995-12-15 0:0:0 



Employment Background

Institution Position Start Date / End Date
 North Dakota State University  Assistant Professor of Music  1995-08-15  1999-05-15
 University of South Alabama  Assistant Professor of Music  1999-08-15  2005-05-15
 Dickinson State University  Associate Professor/Chairman, Department of Music  2007-08--1  2011-05-15
 Midwestern State UNiversity  Associate Professor and Chair, Music  2011-08-15  



Research and Publications

Presentations: (Since 2008)

  • “On Site Repair for Brass Instruments for the School Band Director: Techniques, Tools and Supplies,” Northern Plains Music Festival, November, 2010, Dickinson State University, Dickinson, ND
  • “Music in the Theodore Roosevelt White House, 1901-1909,” Fifth Theodore Roosevelt Symposium, September 17, 2010, Dickinson State University, Dickinson, ND.
  • J.W. Pepper Jazz Reading Clinic: July-August, 2010. Billings, MT/Bismarck, ND
  • Presentation and Performance: “Adapting and Arranging Music from the 19th Century for Brass Instruments/Music for the Trumpet from the Romantic Era.” January 28, 2009, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND
  • “Understanding Jazz,” Hawk’s Point Comm-University Lecture Series, February 7-14, 2008, Dickinson State University, Dickinson, ND
  • Presentation and Performance: “Music for Trumpet from the Romantic Era,” October, 2008, Belmont Mansion at Belmont University, Nashville, TN
  • “Solo and Orchestral Music of the Trumpet in Low E and F.” Crescent City Trumpet Symposium, April  2007, Loyola University, New Orleans, LA

 

Published Manuscripts and Performing Editions:

  • Cox, J.S., edited by Tim Justus. Jesus Lover of My Soul. (Markham, Ontario, Canada, Eighth Note Publications, 2002).
  • Cox, J.S., edited by Tim Justus. Sweet Spirit Hear My Prayer. (Markham, Ontario, Canada, Eighth Note Publications, 2003).
  • Hartmann, John, edited by Tim Justus. Presentation Polka. (Markham, Ontario, Canada, Eighth Note Publications, 2002).
  • Warren, A.E., edited by Tim Justus. Amazon Polka. (Markham, Ontario, Canada, Eighth Note Publications, 2002).
  • Warren, A. E., edited by Tim Justus. Souvenir du Passé. (Markham, Ontario, Canada, Eighth Note Publications, 2002).
  • Twentieth Century Music for Unaccompanied Trumpet: An Annotated Bibliography, Doctoral Dissertation, Louisiana State University, University Microfilms, 1995.